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OK this might be a weird one.

About six months ago we got a couple of 8 week old puppies from the same litter. Within 48 hours of taking posession of them, one of them came down with Parvo. The pup survived but we ended up with only one dog (the second pup never got sick). We had intended to raise the two together so they'd always have each other as playmates, etc. We want to get another puppy but the vet advised us not to bring another pup into the house for at least two or three years, preferrably longer. Even with shots etc. it is a crap shoot whether a pup living in an environment known to have been contaminated will come down with it.

We definately want to add another dog to the household as our experience has been that the critters are happier with four legged companionship, assuming they are a good match. And therein lies the rub. We looked into adopting a rescue dog but after much investigation, deliberation, and trial/error, we decided against it. So please don't raise that debate in this particular thread.

Getting to the point, what we were thinking about was getting a puppy and having someone else keep it and begin some basic training etc. until it is four months old and has had the full battery of shots. Has anyone else ever done this or know of anyone who has done something similar?
 

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why not get a older dog? I dont think its fair for the puppy (or humans too) to get attached and then pulled away.
 

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You do not want to adopt but you are willing to put a puppy into someones home and then after 2 months rip it out of that stable environment and dump it into a strange one. In the meantime your young pup is going through his most formative weeks without another playmate to help him learn dog manners.
Bite the bullet and find a rescue GSP group - I am assuming your pups are GSP's - and adopt an unwanted 4 month old. He will love you just as much.
 

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Um, this is just weird. Who would put up with all housetraining and puppy troubles only to hand it over to someone else?

Besides that, 2 puppies raised together are problematic. They often bond to each other, leaving you the intruder in their little world. You would be far better off getting an adult rescue that's good with other dogs and let him or her help you teach the pup good manners.
 

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Um, this is just weird. Who would put up with all housetraining and puppy troubles only to hand it over to someone else?...
Um, maybe someone who trains dogs for a living???

Just out of curiosity, what happened to the other puppy?
Yeah the other pup wasn't working out so we knocked it on the head...
Actually for various reasons that aren't relevant, we couldn't spend adequate time to do two dogs justice so we decided to adopt one of them out and try a one dog household. After interviewing several families we placed her in a good home and she is living happily across town as the apple of their eyes. The pup that we still have is coming along wonderfully and the other competing issues have been resolved. Having always had multiple dogs and now having tried it with one for a few months, we've just decided we don't like it any more than the pup likes being an only child. So, about face...
 

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Sooo . . . has your situation changed in that you now can do two dogs justice? If you don't have the time to deal with two dogs, you don't have the time to deal with two dogs no matter how the one dog feels about it. What makes you think the dog wants another dog? Maybe the dog just needs more of your time.

I still don't understand why you can't do an adult rescue, but if you don't have the time for two dogs, you just shouldn't do two dogs. No shame in that.
 

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I also don't quite understand what you're proposing. The vet told you to wait 2-3 years because there might be parvo lurking around and even a vaccinated puppy might come down with it, but you want to get a 4-month-old puppy? I would listen to the vet on this one.
 

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Okay, so I'm a bit confused here.. or perhaps I'm misunderstanding you, but you want to get another dog just so your current dog has a companion, yet you can't sufficiently dedicate and devote your time to two dogs? Am I missing something here?

First of all, dogs do not 'need' other dog companions, if you dedicate enough time and attention to your current dog, which maybe you aren't doing, they will be perfectly happy and satisfied having you and your family as their only companions. I highly doubt there is anyway of knowing that your dog is unsatisfied being an 'only' dog. In many cases, having two dogs can be problematic.. what if they don't get a long? Then what are you going to do? But honestly, if you don't have time to give adequate attention to two dogs, then don't get another dog, getting another dog just to entertain the one you have because you don't have enough time is not the answer. Each dog requires individual quality time, and together time. Meaning, each person in the household takes time to spend with each dog occasionally separate from the other dog (for example, sometimes I take only 1 dog to the park, and leave the other at home, and the hubby will take the other for a walk later in the day, vice versa), sometimes they get taken to the park or a walk together by one of us, or both of us, sometimes they are separated from eachother when we go away on vacations, one will be babysat by a friend or relative and the other is in a boarding facility, etc and we also take time out indivually to train them or practice commands in separate rooms of the house, etc. I don't have two dogs for the purpose of entertaining one another. My dogs get sick of eachother and will show aggression or intolerance to eachother if i dont' take the necessary steps to spend quality time alone with each one, and as a whole, and I can honestly say, my Shiba Inu was %100 a happier dog when he had us all to himself, he tolerates the younger dog, and is slowly becomming somewhat attached, but he never has separation issues from him, and is totally satisfied when he's not around the other dog. Just something to keep in mind, I apologize if my comment is irrelevant or if I have misunderstood you in anyway, but I'm just giving some personal thoughts as to what I believe could be a mistake you might be making.

If your totally prepared for a second dog, and have the time to dedicate to EACH of them on a regulalr, daily basis then giver. Please don't get another dog just for the false concept that your dog "needs" another dog as a companion. Also, I'm with everyone else on this about adopting a rescue as opposed to finding someone to raise a pup for you, this to me, just isn't right. Sorry.

Best of luck
 

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Um, maybe someone who trains dogs for a living???


Yeah the other pup wasn't working out so we knocked it on the head...
Actually for various reasons that aren't relevant, we couldn't spend adequate time to do two dogs justice so we decided to adopt one of them out and try a one dog household. After interviewing several families we placed her in a good home and she is living happily across town as the apple of their eyes. The pup that we still have is coming along wonderfully and the other competing issues have been resolved. Having always had multiple dogs and now having tried it with one for a few months, we've just decided we don't like it any more than the pup likes being an only child. So, about face...
I actually think it's completely relevant as to the second puppy. Given what you've said here, I think you've got your hands full with just the one dog. You should manage that situation before adding another.
 

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Um, maybe someone who trains dogs for a living???
Someone who trains dogs for a living full time will probably not have time to deal with your puppy. If they do, it's going to cost A LOT. You're looking at full time care and training for 2 months. Even if they do agree, they will still be doing their dog walking/dog training- whatever it is they do. This will put them in contact with a TON of dogs. The chance of them bringing something home to a puppy is way higher than normal situations. Also, if they agree to board your dog, they probably board other dogs, so that's even more random dogs around your puppy.

I think I agree with other people that it doesn't seem fair to the puppy. It's going to bond to the trainer and really trust them- just to be thrust into another home with an older puppy and people it doesn't know. Moving homes once is already hard for a puppy- you want to do it twice.

Also- if you get your pup from a responsible breeder, I really don't think they're going to want to sell a puppy to someone who just wants to ship it off to someone else to be trained.

However, if you really want to look into it, I'd contact private dog trainers and dog walkers who do boarding. I think you'd have a better chance with individual people in your community who do dog walking/boarding that with the trainers at a dog training school.
 

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First, I'm a little surprised at the 2-3 years suggestion from the vet. One of my friends had a parvo puppy (shelter adoption) and she too survived fine and they were told no unvaccinated puppies for one year and no vaccinated dogs for 6 months.
Even with shots etc. it is a crap shoot whether a pup living in an environment known to have been contaminated will come down with it.
While no vaccine is 100% effective and they rely on herd immunity to prevent outbreaks, if it were that even with shots it is a "crap shoot" then all the vaccinated young and adult dogs going for walks, to dog parks, and out in public in general would be at the same risk IF parvo is a problem in your area. Since you just said it was a crap shoot even for a vaccinated pup, then why are you asking about bringing a 4-month old dog home? If you plan to follow the vets recommendation, then no additional dogs for years.... (which doesn't make sense IMO)

Why not contact breeders of your preferred breed and ask about young adult dogs that were held back as potential show and breeding prospects but didn't work out. You might get a nice 1-2 year old dog, fully vaccinated and fully trained.
Actually for various reasons that aren't relevant, we couldn't spend adequate time to do two dogs justice so we decided to adopt one of them out and try a one dog household.
But then, you'd have to prove to the breeder that your situation of not having enough time for two dogs has truly changed from just a few months ago and that whatever it was causing you to not have adequate time won't be an issue in the future either. You say the reasons aren't relevant, and to us on the internet they might not be relevant, but to any good breeder, they are going to be extremely relevant.
 

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...Since you just said it was a crap shoot even for a vaccinated pup, then why are you asking about bringing a 4-month old dog home? If you plan to follow the vets recommendation, then no additional dogs for years.... (which doesn't make sense IMO)...
When I said even a vaccinated pup, I meant less than 4 mos. old. As I understand it, after they've been through the whole puppy series of shots they are then reliably immune. Until that time it is a crap shoot whether the vaccine has done its job. That's why they get a series of them rather than a single shot at six or eight weeks and done with it. As to the difference in time recommended by the vets, I suspect it's just got to do with the risk tolerance for different individuals.

OK now I've been patient and you folks have had your say. None of which was responsive to the question that I posed, i.e. " Has anyone else ever done this or know of anyone who has done something similar?"

What you all have done, however, is to demonstrate the propensity of human beings to take shards of information, fill in the blanks, and then reach conclusions that likely fit your preconceived notions of a situation. Did any of you ever consider:

MAYBE this person knows as much or more than me about dogs but has never encountered this specific situation and was hoping to find someone who had and could share their experience (as opposed to philosophical retoric).

MAYBE this person said the reasons for parting with one of the pups were not relevant was because he was dealing with a family member who became terminally ill and it was 1) painful to discuss 2) clearly not a repeatable event because it reached its ultimate conclusion 3)noyfb any way

MAYBE this person was thinking profoundly about the wellfare of these pups by agonizing over the decision and ultimately parted with one only after incurring several thousand dollars in vet bills, going through the mental anguish of a sick dog in addition to everything else in life, and going through the trouble of working through the local rescue community, paid advertising, and personally interviewing prospective adoptees until satisfied with the pup's future welfare

Granted it is much easier to just jump to conclusions and start firing salvos that make you feel better about yourself but are not responsive to the question at hand nor helpful to the situation. Some of you may want to consider pursuing careers in theology or politics where you can get paid to stand up in front of people and impose your self righteous opinions on them. If you are already in one of those fields, well that would explain a lot

I'm not sorry if this reply offended anyone because frankly it was well deserved. Hopefully the moderators of this forum will now lock this thread down before any of you climb back onto your high horses and charge off to rescue the world.
 

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Since no one has done the exact thing you asked about, several people tried to give you close options- such as getting a "teen" dog from a reliable breeder of your preferred breed.

A "vaccinated" pup is generally considered to be one that has completed their vaccinations; which is why your terminology re: a "vaccinated" pup still being at risk was confusing.

You might notice that I at least specifically said that I didn't care about your circumstances causing you to give up one of the dogs but that a good breeder WOULD CARE! If the breeder didn't want a reasonable explanation (which, "noyfb" doesn't count) then I would not trust that breeder. I'm sorry that it related to a terminally ill family member, but quite frankly, nothing you said made it clear that the situation was not repeatable.

The closest I can come to having advice on exactly what you want to do (whether it is a good choice or practical choice etc remains to be seen) is that I know a dog trainer who does "board and train" and while she generally doesn't take puppies for clients, she has started off some puppies who are potential service dogs and who will go to service dog puppy raisers. You could look for a trainer in your area that does something similar to "board and train" and explain your interest and reasoning.


Which wouldn't be all that different that getting a slightly older pup (a show/breeding prospect failure) from a good breeder since in either case, you won't have the pup as a little one.

Granted it is much easier to just jump to conclusions and start firing salvos that make you feel better about yourself but are not responsive to the question at hand nor helpful to the situation. Some of you may want to consider pursuing careers in theology or politics where you can get paid to stand up in front of people and impose your self righteous opinions on them. If you are already in one of those fields, well that would explain a lot
Since it is impossible to know all the background on a situation AND not knowing YOU, then people's concerns and suggestions ARE useful and warranted. Usually, people are receptive to ideas that come at solving their problem/situation from a different direction OR give advice that might have them rethink their plans (i.e. that a dog doesn't need another dog, that an older dog is an idea, that you might run into difficulties finding a breeder etc). I really don't see how asking questions to clarify someone's needs and to make sure they have the best intentions for a dog makes someone "self righteous"

Too many times people have come here asking about getting another dog and when they say they gave up a previous dog for "irrelevant reasons" it turns out the dog they gave up was simply too high energy, wasn't given a fair chance at house training, that they "got busy" and didn't have time, or that their living situation etc continues to be too unstable to promise that something similar won't happen with the next dog.

So forgive us for trying to care about the welfare of a dog.....
 

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I am terribly sorry for your loss. Unfortunately, I can't read minds, so when you say you didn't have time for 2 dogs, I have no way of knowing if that situation was a one off or not.

Many of us, including myself, have rescues. Rescues come from people who "didn't have time", sometime for legitimate reasons such as yours, but rarely. Mostly, it's because people are irresponsible jerks. Thus the answers you got. Which aren't rude, btw.

I think you should enjoy your one dog for right now. You're grieving, and it feels pretty raw from over here. Another puppy won't make that better. It'll just add more stress. Really look at the answers you've gotten. It's not a good idea, what you're proposing, for a variety of already stated reasons.

Enjoy your pup. Grieve. It will get better, I promise. One day you wake up and it's not so terribly raw anymore and you can breathe again.
 

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Contact breeders and see if:

1. They will hold on to a puppy until 4+ months for you. I don't know if it will cost more for the extra 2 months of feeding, raising, and vaccinating a puppy.

2. Ask if there are any slightly older pups/adolescents/young adults available. Some pups wash out or maybe they're gun shy, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
The closest I can come to having advice on exactly what you want to do (whether it is a good choice or practical choice etc remains to be seen) is that I know a dog trainer who does "board and train" and while she generally doesn't take puppies for clients, she has started off some puppies who are potential service dogs and who will go to service dog puppy raisers. You could look for a trainer in your area that does something similar to "board and train" and explain your interest and reasoning.
Now there is a constructive comment. That may be an option. By the way, Shell, your first response was one of the more reasonable.

Which wouldn't be all that different that getting a slightly older pup (a show/breeding prospect failure) from a good breeder since in either case, you won't have the pup as a little one.
Yes it would likely be hugely different. In my experience, statistically "washout" dogs or dogs still with breeders at that age tend to have less than desirable issues. Unless the washout is purely for conformation reasons. Still in all, not a lot of them out there.

Too many times people have come here asking about getting another dog and when they say they gave up a previous dog for "irrelevant reasons" it turns out the dog they gave up was simply too high energy, wasn't given a fair chance at house training, that they "got busy" and didn't have time, or that their living situation etc continues to be too unstable to promise that something similar won't happen with the next dog.
Under different circumstances, when people make assumptions about others based on past experience rather than first hand knowledge, it is termed prejudice, bigotry, or even racist depending on the context.

So forgive us for trying to care about the welfare of a dog.....
What isn't forgiveable is for you (collectively) to assume that I don't have the same interest.

Contact breeders and see if:

1. They will hold on to a puppy until 4+ months for you. I don't know if it will cost more for the extra 2 months of feeding, raising, and vaccinating a puppy.

2. Ask if there are any slightly older pups/adolescents/young adults available. Some pups wash out or maybe they're gun shy, etc.
The thought did occur to me to ask a breeder to simply hang on to the pup. But it would really have to be a family home type breeder with one or two dogs, not a large kennel.

This is exactly the dilema and why I posted this to start with. Over the years I've had a system of proven success at raising very calm, disciplined, well socialized dogs without any neurotic behaviors. And with GSPs that is no simple thing. And I believe that the foundation for that success is laid early on in the pup's life (which is why we adopted out the one, not believing that we would adequately lay that foundation with our situation). But my only experience is with either starting 6-8 week old pups, or taking on adult dogs (in which case you get what you get and do the best you can). Starting in the middle is outside my frame of reference which is why I was hoping to benefit from someone else's experience. Does it really make a difference starting with a 4mo old versus 8 weeks? I've assumed so all my life but perhaps that has simply been my own personal prejudice born of my ignorance. Maybe I've been fooling myself thinking that the early bonding is an important aspect of the relationship. But looking down at the soft brown head on my lap as I type this, it seems plausible.

Well I guess one way or the other, I'll likely find out before it's all said and done.

I'm semi sorry for the previous rant. It is a bit frustrating to have people jump to conclusions that are the inverse of reality. We are commited to the well being of our animals as members of our family, not as chattle. We have a provision for them in our will. In the past year we lost two old ladies that shared nearly sixteen years of our life with us. We stuck with them through all of the infirmities of age. In the last year we altered our lifestyle so they wouldn't have to hold their bladders for too long nor go to the kennels. And when the time came we incurred five times the necessary cost to have them put down in our home to save them the fear of that final journey. So maybe you all will forgive me for being a bit sensitive.

Wouldn't it be wonderful if we could all be as unquestioning and accepting as our dogs?
 
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