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Hi all!

This is my first post on this sub, I have a 9 week old Labradoodle, I brought him home 2 weeks ago. To say I was unprepared would be an understatement. Thank you to everyone who has posted in this community, I can relate so much to everything.

While there are definitely ups and downs, I really feel like I'm starting to lose it. My pup got giardia so I really can't take him anywhere except my living room and our very small yard. He is on medication and I am planning to get him into some puppy classes once he is in the clear. But I don't think I've left him or this living room for more than an hour since I got him.

I really feel like I need some space, at least for a few hours. But I just feel so damn guilty leaving him alone. Even when he is napping throughout the day I find it hard to not feel anxious/ stressed that he is going to wake up soon and that I will have to entertain him.

Any advice would be extremely helpful! I am really trying my best over here.
 

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My opinion: While a young pup needs to be crated or monitored (especially one with giardia) 24/7, don't feel like you need to entertain him during every waking minute. You need to take care of yourself in order to take care of him. You're liable to turn a young, needy dog into an adult needy dog.
 
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I'm familiar with that feeling of guilt leaving the dog - but there's nothing wrong with crating the dog and taking a few hours of alone time. Whether that means you leave the house or you just go to a different part of the house. Puppies are a lot of work but they don't need to be coddled and entertained all day every day. It's unrealistic and miserable, as you're figuring out. Don't feel bad for crating him a couple hours at a time. Spend 5 minutes teaching him a new trick or working on one, then 20 minutes romping in the yard and making sure he goes potty, and then stick him in his crate - maybe with a frozen kong, maybe not - and take some time to yourself.

We get dogs so they can add joy to our lives - in theory, at least. Puppies are hard, especially the first few weeks after getting them, but they should still be fun. If you set up a schedule that includes a bit of play and training followed by crate time while you can go out and do whatever you want, he will soon adjust. Don't let puppyhood and unnecessary guilt suck the joy out of puppyhood.

I've heard "we live with the dog we create" and I tend to go by that.
 

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Yep to the above.
You need to crate train, which will be hard for YOU. 😃... they do make us feel guilty.
The pup will be ok and get used to it.
Take time for yourself or you could wind up with a dog you regret.
The p.i.t.a part of puppyhood doesn't last forever.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'm familiar with that feeling of guilt leaving the dog - but there's nothing wrong with crating the dog and taking a few hours of alone time. Whether that means you leave the house or you just go to a different part of the house. Puppies are a lot of work but they don't need to be coddled and entertained all day every day. It's unrealistic and miserable, as you're figuring out. Don't feel bad for crating him a couple hours at a time. Spend 5 minutes teaching him a new trick or working on one, then 20 minutes romping in the yard and making sure he goes potty, and then stick him in his crate - maybe with a frozen kong, maybe not - and take some time to yourself.

We get dogs so they can add joy to our lives - in theory, at least. Puppies are hard, especially the first few weeks after getting them, but they should still be fun. If you set up a schedule that includes a bit of play and training followed by crate time while you can go out and do whatever you want, he will soon adjust. Don't let puppyhood and unnecessary guilt suck the joy out of puppyhood.

I've heard "we live with the dog we create" and I tend to go by that.
Thank you for the reply! Definitely need to have him in the crate more often, it will help me keep my sanity lol.
 

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I'm familiar with that feeling of guilt leaving the dog - but there's nothing wrong with crating the dog and taking a few hours of alone time. Whether that means you leave the house or you just go to a different part of the house. Puppies are a lot of work but they don't need to be coddled and entertained all day every day. It's unrealistic and miserable, as you're figuring out. Don't feel bad for crating him a couple hours at a time. Spend 5 minutes teaching him a new trick or working on one, then 20 minutes romping in the yard and making sure he goes potty, and then stick him in his crate - maybe with a frozen kong, maybe not - and take some time to yourself.

We get dogs so they can add joy to our lives - in theory, at least. Puppies are hard, especially the first few weeks after getting them, but they should still be fun. If you set up a schedule that includes a bit of play and training followed by crate time while you can go out and do whatever you want, he will soon adjust. Don't let puppyhood and unnecessary guilt suck the joy out of puppyhood.

I've heard "we live with the dog we create" and I tend to go by that.
 
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