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This might not be in the correct section,but I need some fast help. Our 65 lb German Shepherd got a hold of less than half a brownie while I left the room. I caught him in the act,so like I said he got less than half of a smaller brownie. Should we call the vet right away,or should we wait a little? Ever since he ate it about 15-20 minutes ago he's had a little bit of gas.
 

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I am not an expert, but I think he should be fine. I once had a dog that ate a ton of Halloween chocolate. We had no idea until we thought he ate some rat bait and took him to the vet. They pumped his stomach and the only thing they found were candy wrappers. He lived until he was 16.

Chocolate isn't good for dogs, but I don't think that little bit could do real damage. Now, if he starts puking and that sort of thing I'd start to be concerned.
 

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My aunt used to feed her dog (when she was a child, that is) full bags of M n' M's and her dog lived to be 18 and never had a problem with it... though I'm not suggesting that you feed your dog M n' M's... no, that would be a bad idea, lol.

But if your dog isn't vomiting or anything, he's probably fine. :)
 

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Thanks for the fast replies.Its a relief to hear what you guys said. It just freaked me out when I walked in the room and saw him and the brownie. No vomitting or anything yet,but we will keep an eye on him. Thanks I will take a look at that link.
 

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Found this and thought I'd post it:

Chocolate contains theobromine, a compound that is a cardiac stimulant and a diuretic. When affected by an overdose of chocolate, a dog can become excited and hyperactive. Due to the diuretic effect, it may pass large volumes of urine and it will be unusually thirsty. Vomiting and diarrhea are also common. The effect of theobromine on the heart is the most dangerous effect. Theobromine will either increase the dog’s heart rate or may cause the heart to beat irregularly. Death is quite possible, especially with exercise. Symptoms of chocolate poisoning include: vomiting, diarrhea, tremors, hyperactivity, irregular heartbeat and seizures.

Larger quantities of chocolate can poison or even kill a medium or large dog. An ounce or two of chocolate may not seem like much but it can be lethal to a small dog that weighs 10 lbs. or less. After their dog has eaten a large quantity of chocolate, many pet owners assume their pet is unaffected. However, the signs of sickness may not be seen for several hours, with death following within twenty-four hours.

Cocoa powder and cooking chocolate are the most toxic forms. These forms of chocolate contain ten times more theobromine than milk chocolate. Even licking a substantial part of the chocolate icing from a cake can make a dog sick. The next most dangerous forms are semi-sweet chocolate and dark chocolate, with milk chocolate being the least dangerous. A dog needs to eat more than a 250gm block of milk chocolate, however the high amount of fat found in milk chocolate can lead to an attack of pancreatitis.

* 1 ounce per pound of body weight (2 ounces per kg of body weight) for milk chocolate.
* 1 ounce per 3 pounds of body weight ( 1 ounce per 1.5 kg body weight) for semi-sweet chocolate
* 1 ounce per 9 pounds of body weight ( 1 ounce per 4 kg) for baker's chocolate.

During many holidays such as Christmas, New Year's Day, Easter and Halloween, chocolate is often accessible to curious dogs, and in some cases, people unwittingly poison their dogs by offering them chocolate as a treat or letting them lick a frosting bowl.
 
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