Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi I my husband and I adopted a Doberman from the rescue society in May. We were told that the owner disclosed he had a habit of eating socks. Not only does he eat socks but he eats blankets, towels, toys, you name it. From the get go he's had diarrhea and vomiting issues which we attributed to new environment, sensitive stomach, etc but it grew worse and we had an xray which showed something in his intestine. He had emergency surgery which has cost us a small fortune. They found a toy dolphin and sock in his intestine. Not sure if he came with it in there on not. I am looking for advice on how to stop the dog from eating everything. Is there some behavior modification we can teach him because the vet said if he eats something again it could happen again and we just can't afford it so we are at a dilemma whether to return him or keep him. Any advice or suggestions would be appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,243 Posts
Some dogs just have to be confined in a dog safe area when you aren't there to watch them. A large crate or a "dog proof room" basically. For when you are there, work hard on "Leave It" and "Drop it" using really yummy treats. Get some large safe dog toys and redirect him to the appropriate chewing item. The extreme Kong and the largest durable nylabone are generally considered as some of the safest chews (less likely for a dog to rip pieces off and swallow them).

While it might not be the answer you're looking for, its likely that changing the humans' habits is going to be more successful that trying to train a 5 year old dog not to eat stuff when you aren't there to stop him. Picking up everything off the floor, towels up on towel bars out of reach or folded in a linen closet, putting dirty socks and towels into a laundry bin with a lid, closing doors to bedrooms, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Our 9 year old Clumber has had 3 sock related surgeries over his lifetime. First was as a puppy when we had for a month. Surprised us but we became vigilant. 2nd time was a year later when visiting my mother. My nephews had left socks under the bed from their visit weeks before. 3rd time we have no idea how he could possibly have gotten one. Our doors to bedrooms and laundry are all kept closed. We also keep peroxide by the back door to give him if we catch him with anything. It has been 5 years since the last surgery and nearly a year since the last peroxide dosing. LOVE our Clumber but we are considering other breeds that are less suicidal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Our 9 year old Clumber has had 3 sock related surgeries over his lifetime. First was as a puppy when we had for a month. Surprised us but we became vigilant. 2nd time was a year later when visiting my mother. My nephews had left socks under the bed from their visit weeks before. 3rd time we have no idea how he could possibly have gotten one. Our doors to bedrooms and laundry are all kept closed. We also keep peroxide by the back door to give him if we catch him with anything. It has been 5 years since the last surgery and nearly a year since the last peroxide dosing. LOVE our Clumber but we are considering other breeds that are less suicidal.
What is a peroxide dosing? Never heard of it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
It acts like ipicac for humans and triggers vomiting for the dog. Our first vet recommended it after the first sock incident for the times we discover something missing. Eg. He recently ate a self sticking wrap I had just removed from an injury. Thought it was high enough he couldn’t reach it when I left the room to get something. It was gone when I came back so I tilted his head back and pooped the peroxide between his floppy lips and his teeth while holding his muzzle closed so he had to swallow the peroxide. 5 minutes later he threw up the wrap and no surgery required and no harmful side effects except a little diarrhea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,702 Posts
My friend has a Flat Coated Retriever pup that eats rocks. He has had one surgery and close a couple of other times. She cannot let him outside without muzzling him as every time he has ended up eating rocks. It is pretty hard to be outside where there are no rocks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
1st step is to shift the human behavior. As stated by Shell, dog proof the house. Every room, every habit. Clean socks are in drawers, dirty socks are in washer, tub with lid behind a closed door. Towels will be more difficult because a Dobie standing on hind legs has a tall reach. Probably best to keep bathroom door closed and prevent entry into areas with towels....... I think you get the idea.

The toys, need to be single piece robust toys. Any small bits that could come off should be removed. All the plush animals in my dog's bin are without eyes, nose or mouth or any plastic bits. All have been removed. I inspect the toys on a regular basis for open seams or tears. Repair is made or the toy is tossed.

Then command training. Leave it, Pass, Ignore......as a command to pass on an object. Drop, Spit, Ishkibble.......as a command to drop anything in the mouth. This command may require you to go mouth fishing to retrieve the item. Work with your dog to become accustomed to his mouth being handled. This is a highly sensitive area for dogs and they are always uncomfortable with your fingers poking around in their maw.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top