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Alright, it's a common problem and we all have it, however my cojack (Jackrussel - Welsh Corgi mix
) will keep barking at whatever passes by, ranges from from cars, people and other dogs (hes hostile towards other dogs aswell).
What I have done, for trying to stop his barking, is simply yelling a no, to make him understand it's unacceptable, however I fear that its not working, its making me restless. I have been researching and found out that certain smells bother the dog, annoy in a way, so it doesn't hurt, but it will most likely stop my dog from barking. It's the skin of citrus fruit (orange etc) but its kind of a waste to just buy oranges to just use the skin.

I need help.
 

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Does your dog bark outside or inside? If he's outside, take him in if he barks. He'll figure it out.

If it's inside, block his view of outside. For instance, if Zoe is barking at something she can see through the window and won't stop when asked, I take her out of the window and keep her out of there for quite awhile. She figured it out quickly enough.
 

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Sometimes adversives (whether it's citronella, a bark collar or just a sharp reprimand) will backfire with bark control because the dog associates the adversive with the thing that triggered the barking to begin with, rather than with the barking.

"Oh, her comes the mailman, and I'm about to get a shot of citronella, so I'd better warn the mailman to stay away by barking at him."

That's my take on it, anyway, based on personal observations and no particular expertise.
 

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I confess. I used a remote "spray " collar when all else failed to stop barking with a dog. He barked at my husband if he moved, came home, sneezed, etc. WOULD NOT QUIT. Husband was ready to get rid of the dog. I tried having DH feed him treats (he'd eat the treat, then keep barking), tried moving in front of husband, tried moving dog, had DH take him for walks, etc. No luck.

I bought the collar that has a "good" tone, "bad" tone and spray button that sprays a lemon scent. I spent a day working with him. Then when DH came home, and he barked, said "that's enough", used "bad" tone (a short "beep beep"). Then when he continued to bark, did the spray on the lowest setting. Dog stopped barking immediately. I've only had to spray him twice. Now he'll stop barking with me saying "that's enough" about 90% of the time. The other 10% of the time, I just have to use the "bad" tone, and he quits.

So this was a godsend for me. I got it at petsmart. It's a Petsafe brand spray collar. The spray smells like lemon pledge. It's a superfine mist. I think it cost about 89.00 and was worth every penny.

If you go this route, you MUST train your dog to understand the good/bad tones. You also need to use a verbal command, before using the bad tone, to allow them the opportunity to do as you asked (stop barking). Then you MUST do the bad tone, give time to obey, then the spray. That way they learn the verbal command. As I stated, he only got sprayed twice, and now quits off a verbal command for the most part, or the bad tone. He hasn't been sprayed since the first day.

****Make sure you are giving him enough exercise. A JRT is high energy. A dog with no way to burn off the energy will tend to be highly reactive to things. You need to be walking him a couple of times a day for about 45 min each time. Not a mosey/sniff/pee on things walk, but a brisk march. If he is not getting walked (and playing in a yard is not the same), it is unfair to expect him to be well behaved/non barking. Using a spray collar to shut up an underexercised dog would be unfair to the dog.
 

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From the book I've read it says one of the best ways of stopping a dog from barking is giving him a chewtoy like Kongs (or like the biscuit balls).
 

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To start with, you realize that your dog does not speak English, obviously, so yelling "No!" doesn't really mean anything to him. Many dogs eventually learn "no!" as a kind of leave it, but as far as specific behavior that it cues? It doesn't do anything unless you have SPECIFICALLY trained it, and from the photo, your dog is a puppy. From the corgis I know? You're just revving him up more. "Mom is barking too, it must be REALLY IMPORTANT!" So don't bother yelling- it's obviously not working and it's just frustrating you AND him.

Next, how much exercise is he getting? These are two VERY active breeds, the mix is going to be a tough, intense little dog. Corgis are MEANT to be a watchdog (there is a long and glorious history of cattle theft in the various Celtic cultures, there's a whole Irish myth cycle that is basically based on it and quite a few smaller stories in the Welsh myths.) They're nto a guard breed, they're a "HEY! HEY! WAKE UP MOM! THEY"RE STEALING OUR STUFF!" type dog, and most of them still take their job seriously today. :p JRTs were bred to bark for their lives - it's hard to dig out a terrier who's cornered quarry if you don't know where he is! Mental exercise can help too- buster cubes, everlasting chew balls, chews- but he needs a good amount of exercise every day. So, keeping your dog well-exercised enough that he's willing to SLEEP rather than sit around and Plot Things is essential.

For an intent little alarm barker, I really wouldn't recommend any sort of citornella collar. Frankly, they just don't work that well. And I would bet on your dog becoming collar smart ("This only works when it's on me" and/or "I can bark this many times and it'll quit working"- the citronella collar holds about 25 sprays before it is empty) VERY quickly.

What I *WOULD* do is condition your dog that someone coming up the walk is a Good Thing For Dogs. Enlist a couple of friends. Set things up so that you know when htey'll be coming, and be where you can watch your dog. Let him be loose in whatever room you're usually in when company or the mailman arrives, but watch him closely. Be prepared with a bowl of small but yummy treats. As SOON as he spots the person (and he may be watching them out a window, but he may also just hear them, depending on how quiet your neighborhood is. So the first sign may be that he stands up and is 'on alert' change in body posture, it may be an ear flick, or it may be dashing to the sofa to stand on the back and stare out the window.) As SOON as you know he's aware of their presence, tell him "Thank you!" and throw a small handful of treats on the floor. If he isn't interested in the treats, you've got one of three problems - you gvae the treats too late, after he was fixated on the person on the walk; you are using treats that aren't good enough (I recommend pea-sized pieces of something stinky and delicious, like bologna or liver or cheese- no biscuits, no kibble); or your friend is coming up the walk too fast. (Having a cell phone that you can stay on and say "Okay, stop THERE, okay, walk away, or come closer" to coordinate makes this easier.)

When your dog stops to eat the treats, have your friend walk back down the path, then have him come up again. And repeat. Do this 5-6 times, then put your dog in his crate (and if he doesn't have a crate, he needs one, in an area of the house that he can't see the front from so he's not getting to practice this behavior whenever you're not around.) and invite your friend in and give them beer and pizza (or your meal of choice) for their trouble. :p After they've eaten, repeat the exercise with the dog, and call it a day.

Get as many different people as you can to play this game with you and your dog. It's NOT going to be a quick fix (figure 10-15 sessions of working on it SHOULD give you a handle, but won't be 100% - keep a log though of how close the person gets to the door before the dog notices them, and you SHOULD see some improvement every session), but will eventually fix the problem- you're basically re-wiring his impulse to be a watchdog. It doesn't HAVE to be new people every time, but it should be at least 3-4.
 

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I agree with Dogstar. He has to understand what you want of him before he'll understand a correction. If you can do it the best thing is to give what she suggests a try. He's young (at least he looks it to me) you can certainly teach him what is expected of him.

I had one boy who would flip out every morning when the "Big Yellow Monster" came to steal our neighbors childeren (aka the school bus). That was difficult because in his mind he was honestly trying to protect the kids. He'd sit on the couch with his head resting on the back looking at the kids waiting for the monster to get there....then when it started to collect all of the kids he got so angry and nasty and I am sure if he could have gotten out there he would have been latched onto the tire. But, he got nuts and scared it away (or so he thought) so he won the fight every morning. That was tough and it took a while and moving the couch to end his battle completely. Had I been able to practice it more with him (I don't have a bus) and let him experience the situation more things would have been much simpler. That along with the fact that it was at 6:30am....I don't function that early!

When he understood that it was wrong to try to kill the kid eating moster and he learned that it also spit the kids out later on (I took him outside on a leash so he could see his little friends come back out in the afternoon) I was able to correct him when he got nutty and eventually he was ok with it. He'd always run and watch but he stopped trying to attack is way out of my window.

It's just going to take you some time and some work. I like the citronella collars very much and I have used them but until you can get him to understand good from bad and right from wrong you really can't correct him with one of them.

Dogstar.....any babies yet?????
 

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No, she's making me nuts. This is day 63 from he first breeding; Dr. Esmond said he thought it was probably the second or third breeding based on size of puppies palpated on 12/23. So she COULD go as late as Tuesday or wednesday.
Oh....well, better you wait a day or two then to have them too early.

So, are you taking her temp constantly at this point or have you not gotten yourself there yet? By now I'd be checking every couple of hours and driving her crazy;)

Good luck...hope everything goes perfect for you.
 

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Cojack is alert barking.....letting you know of possible intruders in your territory. He's doing his job as a good member of the pack. He did his job....now you need to do your's as the leader of that pack. Lower members of the pack alert the leader....he/she is the one responsible for confronting the intruder and either running them off, welcoming them in or, if necessary, kill them.
You thank Cojack for the alert....his job is done now. You take over by stepping between Cojack and the intruder. That sends Cojack the clear message that you'll handle it.....he can go back to his bed, his toy or whatever he was doing before the interruption. Once he learns that you'll do your part, his barking will decrease dramatically.
 

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I have a cojack too and hes a barker! Sometimes I cant hear myself talk when I am out with him on the lead because he barks at the person I'm having a conversation with, its very annoying! I have to get down to his level and distract him to stop him doing it! When he is off the lead he is fine and rarely barks so I think maybe he is just trying to protect me?
 
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