Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I need my dog to learn to go on a potty training pad. I can't always take him out as much as he needs to and he won't hold it. He's a couple yrs old, so he's not a puppy but he's never grasped the idea of going on the pad. I tried them when he was a puppy and he would go everywhere except the pad. I'm going to be moving and renting in a few months so I need to get him trained.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
472 Posts
You could do a couple of things, unless you're completely married to the idea of pads.

Because your dog is an adult, he can hold it for at least 8-9 hours (unless he's got some kind of health issue). It sounds like he just doesn't know he's supposed to. If you would like to actually housetrain him, I would suggest crating him for the time you are away in a crate that is just big enough for him to stand and turn around. Most dogs generally don't want to go where they are sleeping, so this would provide some insentive for him to hold it until you can let him out. Of course, if you are gone for an extremely long period (say 10-12 hours), then I wouldn't suggest crating. Crating isn't cruel. Most dogs sleep during the day when their people are gone, anway.

Otherwise, if you really want to pad train him, make sure you purchase puppy pads and not adult pads. Puppy pads have a scent that lures a dog to use them. You can also purchase adult pads (they're actually cheaper) and buy the scent in a separate spray bottle. Until your dog gets the idea, you could confine him to a limited area with his rest/play spot on one end and his potty area on the other. OR, you could place pads underneath the entire area in which you confine him, getting him used to the idea that he's supposed to go on pads. Then, slowly, start removing pads until you have just one or two.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,350 Posts
I don't completely agree with the premise that adult dogs can always hold it 8-9 hours. I have small breed dogs and they could not hold it that long, period. We've done all the potty training, etc, and they can't do it. I also remember some members posting that they take their adult dogs out for middle of the night potty breaks because they just plain need them.
Just like humans, everyone is different. There's no way I could hold it for 8 hours, either. LOL! But, my fiance could hold it way longer than 8 hours!

Back to the OP. If you absolutely must use pads, which I personally don't like (we had bad experiences with pads), then you train that just as you would train a pup/dog to go outside.
Go back to the basics of potty training, except inside of reinforcing outside, you reinforce the pad.

- don't give the dog any freedom around the house. Keep him in your sight at all times. That way, you can see if he tries to sneak off and pee somewhere other than the pad. And, you can watch for the signs that he has to go. (circling, excess sniffing, being agitated)
- a few minutes after eating/drinking/playing/exercising take the dog to the pad, and say go potty. If he moves off the pad, put him back and say go potty. When and if he does, give him lots of praise and a fabulous high value treat.
- other than those times, every hour to two hours, take him to the pad and say go potty. If he moves, put him back. Praise and treat if he goes.

The reason for not giving him any freedom in the house is that you want to see what he's doing, and keep him from peeing/pooping in the wrong spot. It's really all about managing the dog, not even giving him the chance to have an accident. And, if he does, clean the accident with an enzymatic cleaner, not just a regular household cleaner. And, don't scold or yell. That can make the dog think it's wrong to go potty at all, not just that he went in the wrong spot. It's your job to make going in the right spot such a strong habit that he doesn't do anything else.

Oh, and the reason I personally don't like pads is: we used them with our first pup because we were in an apartment and quite a ways from the nearest outdoor potty area. But, in the end, it gave him the idea that it was ok to go on anything remotely pad-like, like door mats, throw rugs, bath mats, etc. He never went on laminate or wood floors, or even the carpeted bedrooms. Just small things that reminded him of the pads......ICK.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
472 Posts
Yes, you are right -- I was perhaps being too general about how long an adult can hold it. It does depend on the dog. My small-breed 5-month-old can hold it for 7-and-a-half hours at night, indicating she might be able to go as long as 8 or 9 when she's fully grown. So it varies.

What I was talking about, though, is crating. Unless you provide your dog with a lot of stimuli in his crate, he's generally going to sleep when he's in there. He really doesn't have anything else to do (so long as he's crate-trained not to be anxious in the crate). Asleep, the dog can hold it longer. At that point, it really depends on the OP's schedule and how long the OP's dog really can hold it. If it's 8-9 hours, then the OP could potentially crate the dog during the day during the housetraining process. If the dog can't, then the OP could maybe look into coming home for lunch, or asking a friend or neighbor to let the dog out after around 4 hours.

I agree that housetraining is better than pads, although the often-cited problem of the dog thinking everything pad-like is a pad isn't happening with my puppy. Again, it depends on the dog. I have bathmats that are the same size as the pad holder where the pads are secured. My puppy doesn't pee or poop on the bathmat. I suppose if the dog is sensitive to the smell that puppy pads are infused with, they are more likely to use the pads rather than pad-like mats. If the dog doesn't really pay much attention to that smell, then the shape or feel of the pad and pad-like mats become more important. And many adult pads don't have the smell at all.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top