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Hey all, I am asking feedback from anyone that can help me lol since I have no idea how to begin with this lol.
OH gave me the idea of training Jo (since Izze isn't the type lol lol) to do things like open doors, fetch drinks from the fridge, turn off lights etc... Amy feedback is greatly appreciated.
 

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You want to teach him just for the fun of it? Thats a good idea! I should do that with Remy too. Give him a job. He'd like that. I dont know how they do it. Guide's arent taught stuff like that and the 'finish' training is done by the proffessional's at the school anyhow. I'll be watching this to see if anybody else knows how. I know to open doors, the fridge, and stuff, they hook something to the door so the dog can grab onto it. But thats about all I know :)
 

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Labmom when I started this thread I was hoping you'd be around :), I want to know that too, the rope on doors/fridge etc & having the dog open them, how to you begin training that? Jo is very biddable, not stubborn at all & very smart. Which is why I want to challenge her mentally, I think she would really enjoy it :D. Perhaps I will Google it later or when Im on the home PC (so I can CTRL =C the links... Something I can't do when Im mobile) & share them in this thread. :)
 

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Oh I'm, always around ;) Share whatever you learn. I dont know why I didnt think of this myself earlier. It's such a good idea! I'll try and look into it too. Though, I promised myself I'd get off my butt and get some stuff done today. I've been spending way too much time sitting here.
 

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These are things which are very easy to teach by shaping with a clicker. Much more complicated to teach with other methods. I've seen a LAMB taught to close cabinet doors with a clicker. And dogs are smarter than sheep. I start by clicking a dog for touching my fingers with his nose. Once he's really good at that, I can put a post-it note on my finger, then a postit note on anything else I want him to touch. For many dogs, they generalize touch so well that the postit note step isn't necessary. If I STARE at an item, Alice knows to interact with it and see what I'll reward. I also teach them to touch with a paw, by clicking any paw interaction with a margerine lid on the floor. Retrieve (which would allow the dog to open doors, retrieve objects) is a modification of a nose target. Once the dog knows to touch a dowel rod or other object, and is absolutely certain that touching it with nose will get a click and treat, and it doesn't, they will get frustrated and give you something bigger - which usually involves teeth - then you have the beginning of a retrieve. The last dog I taught a retrieve to, we had it in under an hour total training time (several very short - a minute or less - training sessions). This is the power of clicker training. Once the dog knows how to learn, and how to experiment, you can quickly get complex behaviors that would take a long time to teach with traditional methods (if you could at all) A really good resource, with a lot of people who are self-training service dogs for real work is Sue Ailsby's Training Levels Yahoo list. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P9Fyey4D5hg THIS is the sort of stuff you can accomplish with clicker training.
 

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@ labmom, are you on Facebook? I am: www.facebook.com/dogdragoness I will share the links there too in the egent this thread gets lost or something lol.

Paws>> of course I will stay positive about it, Jo knows touch, i guess I'll start with getting her to take an object first.
 

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That's why I started this thread... To learn how to communicate effectively lol.

by staying positive I meant in my training methods, you know how they used to train dogs how to retrieve :(
 

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When I taught Bear to open the fridge I broke it down into 'take it' and 'tug'. He already knew take it, I started that one by holding out a toy, then marking and either giving a food reward or playing when he grabbed it. When he was consistently taking the object I added the verbal command 'take it.' As far as 'tug' that's just something that I would say whenever we're tugging to signify the start of the game.

So to combine them and get him to open the fridge, I just tied a spare leash around the handle and told him to take it, then said 'tug' when he had it in his mouth. At first I would click and treat for the smallest of tugs, then gradually held out until he was opening the fridge a little, then opening the door all the way. Once he understood what I wanted and was purposefully tugging the door all the way open I named the behavior 'open the fridge.'

As far as turning lights on and off, I never taught that one to Bear. The light switches in the house just aren't placed in a way that it would be easy for him to reach without potentially hurting himself/knocking something over. However, I had trained my old GSD/Collie mix to do it. Now this is a few years back, so the exact method is a little fuzzy. I think I just put my hand on top of the switch on the wall and had him target that, then slowly faded my hand so he was targeting the switch instead. Unfortunately I don't quite remember how I faded my hand. I believe I c/t him for staying with his paws on the wall, and continued to c/t for any interest in the switch. He was an exceptionally bright dog, so the fact that he learned the desired behavior was probably more due to his phenomenal ability to figure out what I wanted him to do than my training methods.

I can't offer any help as to the fetching of drinks. It's something that I've always wanted Bear to do, but he has the tendency to chomp on anything he carries, so I never took the risk of him puncturing the can/bottle and hurting himself and/or spilling everything.

Sorry if anything is hard to understand, I'm not the best at explaining myself.
 

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may try the fridge thing, ours is hard for me to pull open sometimes so may have to just try the bathroom door or something

when I am teaching take, it sounds so much like shake he is trying to put up a paw. Should I try grab or is there a better word, or keep using take?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
may try the fridge thing, ours is hard for me to pull open sometimes so may have to just try the bathroom door or something

when I am teaching take, it sounds so much like shake he is trying to put up a paw. Should I try grab or is there a better word, or keep using take?


Yeah Im going to do our outside screen door first to teach the behavior (after she learns take & tug) I think im going to use "open" for her marker word, keep it simple for her lol. The screen door is easy to open, I think it would be perfect to learn a behavior :).

Training dogs is so fun!!!!!
 

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@ labmom, are you on Facebook? I am: www.facebook.com/dogdragoness I will share the links there too in the egent this thread gets lost or something lol.

Paws>> of course I will stay positive about it, Jo knows touch, i guess I'll start with getting her to take an object first.
I just sent you a friend request. Teri Stull :)

I'm so bad at learning training techniques from text; I do so much better when I'm shown it in person. I'll sit down and focus on this later when I have more time.
 

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Hehe, just a thought, but training your dog to open the fridge may not be the best idea, unless you crate them during the day or you lock your fridge closed. I trained my old dog, Shenzi, to open the fridge and get cans out of it (she was super easy to train and wonderfully smart). However, the fridge is where good and tasty food is kept, so when I wasn't around, Shenzi decided to help herself - to two pizzas, three pounds of lunch meat, some leftover mac and cheese, some yogurt and a bag of oranges :)
 

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Hehe, just a thought, but training your dog to open the fridge may not be the best idea, unless you crate them during the day or you lock your fridge closed. I trained my old dog, Shenzi, to open the fridge and get cans out of it (she was super easy to train and wonderfully smart). However, the fridge is where good and tasty food is kept, so when I wasn't around, Shenzi decided to help herself - to two pizzas, three pounds of lunch meat, some leftover mac and cheese, some yogurt and a bag of oranges :)
LMBO ^^^ Jo is crated in the rare event Im gone, but since I live where I work (new job will have the same setup) in relation, I have to set something heavy, usually one of my dumbbells) on the treat container, which is a small dog foosld storage container with one of those latch things that snap down, Izze knows how to open those & will while im gone & eat all the (grain inclusive... Lol) treats out of there. Of course she will leave the wide open trash alone... Go figure.

Labmom>> got it :) thanks.
 

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Hey all, I am asking feedback from anyone that can help me lol since I have no idea how to begin with this lol.
OH gave me the idea of training Jo (since Izze isn't the type lol lol) to do things like open doors, fetch drinks from the fridge, turn off lights etc... Amy feedback is greatly appreciated.
Emily has a great vid on teaching light switches ...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F5FF6iqrbJs



A completely oversimplified version, but generally speaking >>>

For opening doors: What I like to do is start with an old dish towel or rag, cut it into a strip about 1" wide by 6" long. Generate interest in it right off the hop by playing a basic chase / "git it" kinda thing, like you would with a cat toy on a string. Quickly change the game to tug by selectively reinforcing for an open mouth, a bite, a tug, a good STRONG tug, and eventually a strong, singular, extended tug and release. Reinforcing for the release is equally important.

Once you have it, you can now tie that strip to door handles, the fridge door, cupboard drawers, etc. If you wish, you can whittle down the towel strip to using a smaller, less conspicuous rope or whatever.

For the retrieve portion: Aside from the basic fundamentals of a retrieve, ensure that you proof your dog on metal cans, plastic bottles, etc. For the can, I'll take an empty one and step on it to flatten it in the middle leaving the bottom and top still round, during the initial stages, just to make it easier for the dog to gain a better grip on it. (keep in mind that many dogs dislike the metallic sensation on their teeth, so be prepared to reward heavily at this stage) Have the dog retrieve it from a horizontal orientation, and a vertical orientation as well.

For a fridge retrieve just simply chain the two segments together ... and VIOLA ! easy peasy


Training dogs is so fun!!!!!
Ya, most of the time :p but I still think this one wins for "Quote of the Day" ! :)
 

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A few weeks ago we had a sub in Gracie's therapy dog class and she trained service dogs. Here is what we learned:

The beginning stages of opening handicapped doors (the ones with the button)
The beginning stages of turning on lights.

To open handicapped doors:

1. Get an easy button from Staples (for real).
2. Teach your dog to hit it with her paw (not her nose--have to hit very hard to open doors and could damage teeth).
3. Each time dog's paw touches the button, mark and treat. (You can start by doing it with it flat in your hand. Then move it so it is vertical. Then, eventually, attach it to walls, etc.)
4. She will eventually need to hit it hard enough to make it say "that was easy."
5. Eventually, the button is covered in foil so it is shiny like handicapped door buttons.

Turning on lights.

1. Hold your hand above the dog's nose, treat in hand
2. when dog bumps your hand with nose, mark and treat.
3. Eventually add command (bump is what we use).
4. Take dog to light switch. Place hand under switch and say "bump"
5. Slowly move hand out of equation

A couple of weeks ago, our regular trainer gave us the steps to close regular doors.

1. Teach "touch" (our trainer said to tape/hold a treat on an index card and hold it next to the dog. Each time she touches the card sideways, mark and treat)
2. Once she is consistent, open a cabinet door, take her to it and give her the command you want to use. (make sure that it closes in the same direction that you taught the command with the card...unless you taught both ways)
3. He said to be careful with this one. Once, he dog locked him out of the house :)

If I can get some of this on video, I will. We have been working on the easy button/bump thing for about three weeks. She is very good with bump, but there are no light switches low enough for her, LOL.
 

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The more I think of this, I dont think I'd better train Remy to open the fridge ;) I do leave him inside, uncrated, when I leave. I'm picturing him emptying the fridge, opening doors to get into rooms he's not allowed, turning all the lights on and off all day; I think I'd better think of other things to teach him.
 

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I'm doing this with Brady, actually...secretly :p

That's why all of his commands have a practical use.

The one that was the hardest for him so far has actually been "Take It" to get him to take something into his mouth.

I couldn't do it with click/treat and repetition because he would just immediately drop whatever his mouth was on no matter what.

For the past month or two, I've been telling him to "Take it" when giving him a chewie.

Last night, just to see, I pointed to a sock I had dropped and said "Take it" and, sure enough, he picked it up. I then said "Give"...realized he didn't know what that meant...so I held the sock and said "Drop" and voiala...he had totally just picked up the sock and given it to me. YAY! He got lots of praise and treats.
 
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