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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello!

Short version: Our 10 mo old husky jumps up and bites me on walks and I am at a loss.

Long version (sorry it's so long!):

My husband and I got our first dog together in January at 8-9 weeks old. He's a male husky and he's our baby who we love very very much and would never give up, but we REALLY need help with him...

He was a little angel until about 4 months old when he started to jump up and bite me on walks seemingly out of nowhere. Just walking along peacefully and suddenly he turns to face me and is all over me--biting my purse and my arms mostly. If he goes for my purse and I try to pull it away from him, he bites my arms instead. And there's no way I'd believe this is play biting. This HURTS A LOT. I have painful bruises all over my wrists. He's torn several shirts and pairs of pants. And he doesn't just bite me once and it's over, he latches on. When I try to walk away or pull away he latches on somewhere else. He'll get in front of me (apparently trying to stop me from walking), jump up and keep going. He doesn't do this to my husband at all.

I've tried standing on his leash so that all he can do is lay down and waiting a couple minutes, completely ignoring him the whole time. That usually doesn't work since after we keep going, he usually starts up again. After doing this maybe 3 or 4 times, he might be out of his funk. I've tried the same thing except I tie him up to the nearest pole or fence or whatever and get out of reach of him. Pretty much the same results there. With both those methods I try to get him to sit or give paw or lie down or something just to maybe distract him from whatever it is that's making him crazy and put him in an obedient mood, I don't know.

I've tried just keeping on walking and ignoring him as much as I can without tripping over him. That has given me better results (sometimes he stops after 30 seconds or so) but often I just can't keep going because he is either stopping me from moving by
standing completely in my way or I just can't take the pain anymore, so I stand on his leash.

We walk him every day. I do it most days since I have a desk job and my husband is on his aching feet all day, which is fine by us. We've generally followed the rule of 5 minutes x his age in months to figure how long to walk him each day since that's what I've read (so now that he's 10 months, 5 * 10 = 50 minutes a day). He doesn't jump up and bite me every walk, but lately it's around every 2 or 3 walks.

I can tell now when he's excited and thinking of doing it. He turns his head in my direction (but not straight at me) and starts panting harder and faster. Sometimes he just thinks about doing it and doesn't; other times that's when he gets in front of me, stops, jumps up and bites me.

At home he's mostly good. If he gets too excited he bites me or my husband hard, like he does on walks with me, and sometimes he tries to climb all over us. The only thing that seems to stop him then is to ignore him (turn around, look away, walk away, etc.) which can be difficult because he keeps biting most of the time. Often we're forced to kick him out of the room and let him back in for another try later. For rooms without doors we use a baby gate which he now dislikes--he's not afraid of it but he knows its presence means he needs to stop being reactive and calm down.

When he first started biting (which was after only a couple weeks with us) we just chalked it up to teething. I tried whining like a puppy to get him to see he's biting too hard, and that stopped him only one or two times. After that it made no difference. He doesn't stop even if you're whining like crazy and curled up in a ball. I tried shaking a jar of pennies, which worked for a couple weeks. Same results with a spray bottle.

The breeder we got him from told us that he's smarter than his littermates--he would avoid playing rough with his siblings so he had more time to get milk from mom, so he was the fattest one in his litter. I've wondered if because he avoided playing rough so early on, maybe he didn't get enough time to learn how rough is too rough. Just a theory.

Before he started jumping and biting me on walks, I was more strict with him--I had him on a shorter leash and wouldn't let him stop to sniff every little thing as he likes to do. I'd gently pull him along and tell him to come in a nice voice, then tell him good boy when he was by my side again.

After he started jumping and biting, I read some forum that suggested letting him sniff more and having a longer leash and changing up where we walk each time. I don't mind changing up where we walk but just letting him dawdle doesn't seem like something a pack leader would do to me. Whatever, I did it anyway. I was scared of him and frustrated and confused and hurt that he would do this to me.

My husband said I shouldn't make eye contact with him on walks because that could be intimidating to him, so I did, and that has seemed to reduce how often he jumps and bites, but it still happens a lot. I've been trying to see a pattern to figure out what I'm doing wrong or what's making him reactive. I noticed it almost always happens on the second half of our walk, when we're on our way back home. There are also some places that I avoid now (only on the second half of a walk) because he tends to do it in those places, like right around two intersections near our house. I thought since he does it at those intersections, maybe traffic is stressful for him and makes him crazy? Now I don't think that's the case because he does it in the same place even when it's nighttime and nobody is around. Sometimes we pass barking dogs but he only ever jumped up and bit me once from that. A couple times he bit me just as we were walking up to the house at the end of a walk. One of those times he had grabbed a stick and was carrying it with him. I looked at him (didn't make eye contact though) and just cooed at him about having a stick. I had no intention of taking it away. A second or two after cooing at him he jumped up and bit me. Other times nothing had happened that I could see as we were walking up to the house.

A couple weeks ago my husband and I walked him together. I had his leash and my husband wanted me to go back to having him on a short leash to have more control over him, so I did. I could tell he wanted to jump up and bite me a couple times, but he wouldn't probably because my husband was there. He wanted me to not let him sniff everything for so long too, so I didn't. It went pretty well, and I've kept up that practice since then, but the jumping and biting hasn't changed. I'm glad I have more control over him, but the biting NEEDS to stop.

I took him to an 8 week basic manners class starting when he was about 6 months old. I know basic manners doesn't address this issue, but I thought I might learn some things about proper training and figure out what I'm doing wrong. The class didn't really help--I learned a lot but the instructor didn't have many solutions for me. She saw him jump up and bite me a few times just like he does on walks and didn't have any definite explanation as to why he did it. She just said he's reactive and turns to me when he's being reactive, and he's also probably doing it just because he can some of the time--he's just at that adolescent age and fighting for dominance. She told me to make sure I'm calm at all times and to lick my lips when he's looking at me because that's dog language for "I don't mean any harm". I FEEL calm all the time but maybe I'm really not. Licking my lips seemed to change his mind maybe one time, but he seemed frustrated after, like now he couldn't bite me because it's not justified anymore or something. Other than that it makes no difference.

The instructor also said to not have any kind of aggressive playtime with him and not to try to resolve his biting through aggression. I don't, but my husband kind of does. He gets him all riled up just by petting him excitedly and using an excited voice or growling back at him. If he starts biting, he tells him no (which has no effect) and sometimes kind of wrestles him so he can't bite him anymore. Sometimes he holds his mouth shut to stop him biting or just kind of gently slaps his head. All of this just eggs him on, so I don't know why he still does it. My husband never hurts him. I know he's just trying to take control and establish himself as pack leader, but I don't agree with what he's doing. I think it just encourages him to be aggressive. I told him what the instructor said about this and he just doesn't think what he's doing is a problem.

As a side note, he's also destructive with his toys and our belongings when he can get hold of them, but that's not as important an issue to me.

He's not all bad--there are lots of times when he's a sweet, cuddly, adorable boy full of love and affection. I know this behavior might just be happening because he's still an adolescent, but I think it's probably a bad idea to let him get used to this as he becomes an adult. I know it's probably bad that it's gone on this long without us finding a solution, but we've tried really hard! We have no idea what to do anymore. We love him so much and we know we must be doing something wrong but we don't know what (aside from my husband's aggressive methods, in my opinion). If anybody has any advice or criticism PLEASE TELL ME! =(

And sorry this is so long, I just wanted to be as in depth as I could without writing a book...

EDIT: I probably should've mentioned he was neutered at 6 months. Before then he liked to hump me when he was getting bitey in the house sometimes and that completely stopped after. Nothing else has changed.
 

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Stop your husband from holding the dog's mouth shut, stop him from wrestling the dog till he can't bite (I am going to presume you mean something similar to an "alpha roll") and definitely stop him from smacking the dog on the nose.

There is no "pack leader" to worry about, humans already have control with out big brains and opposable thumbs. Dominance in that context is very well debunked science.

I would say to look at "The bite stops here", the sticky on reactive dogs in the training section (although geared more to dogs that are reactive to other dogs, the training info is solid in general) and do a little searching on positive training. Exercise in general will often help an over excited dog also, just no hard running on leash or alongside a bike/similar at that age.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Stop your husband from holding the dog's mouth shut, stop him from wrestling the dog till he can't bite (I am going to presume you mean something similar to an "alpha roll") and definitely stop him from smacking the dog on the nose.

There is no "pack leader" to worry about, humans already have control with out big brains and opposable thumbs. Dominance in that context is very well debunked science.

I would say to look at "The bite stops here", the sticky on reactive dogs in the training section (although geared more to dogs that are reactive to other dogs, the training info is solid in general) and do a little searching on positive training. Exercise in general will often help an over excited dog also, just no hard running on leash or alongside a bike/similar at that age.
Thank you so much! I'll do my best to convince my husband to stop what he's doing. I just tried step 1 of "the bite stops here" a few times and it worked really well--I shut the door in his face as soon as he hurt me and waited about a minute. He was clearly disappointed.

I'm kind of anticipating having trouble doing that when I'm not conveniently in a room with a door to shut in his face. Sometimes I'm sitting at my desk when he comes over, and if I pet him just that is enough to get him excited and bite me sometimes (especially if I have food he wants that I'm not giving to him). I'd have to walk across the house to get to a door. I can put the baby gate next to me or in a doorway but that's kind of clumsy and a lot slower than closing a door. Me walking away quickly is kind of exciting for him too, and me walking away slowly just makes me a slowly moving target.

The same goes for walks... the next best thing I can do is stand on his leash, which he actually doesn't really mind. He's content to lie down and sniff and look around for several minutes. At that point he starts whining because he's bored I suppose and if we continue the walk at that point sometimes he starts biting me again.

Anyway... I'll keep it up, I just don't know if doing this will translate into him learning not to bite at all or only when we're in the middle of doing something fun.

As for exercise, I actually wanted to buy a bike attachment kinda soon so I could bike with him, but I guess I should hold off on that. How old is old enough for that?

Thank you again! I'm cautiously optimistic... =)
 

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Huskies play terribly rough. You may think it's meanness, but really it's likely just him having no idea how strong he is. My girl was a little under 40 pounds, a scrawny little thing, and she would leave marks on me and scratches all up and down my arms and back. They are known for that.

As for licking your lips, that's actually a sign of stress in dogs. In horses it's calm, but in dogs it's generally anxiety. And dogs tend to read our body language as us, not as them. They know the difference between a human and a dog.
And the pack leader stuff, like shell said, is bunk. You're your dogs parent, his leader, his caretaker and that's all you ever need to be. Your thumbs automatically give you that.

Huskies are one of two things; either they are highly and easily excitable or highly sensitive. Some huskies the mouth holding and the smacking would cause them to be completely afraid, and other, like your boy, will see that as you engaging in their rough play. And yes it will make it worse.

You are doing right by ignoring him when he jumps at you. Overall, that is the best thing to do. Ignore him until he quits, then proceed with what you were doing. And the same with playing. Instead of using your hands, use a toy or something to tug with and fight over, and if he gets too rough, stop playing with him. Be constant and consistent in this and he will learn his boundaries, that if he gets too rough then all the fun stops.
 

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I read the first 3 paragraphs of the "long story" at this point. The puppy was only 4 months when it began, sounds like it needed to bite something and play - walks can get BORING. The way you described stepping on leash ect.. I would say wrong move for such a young or for that matter any dog, ever hear of OPPOSITION REFLEX?

Your pup sounds fun, and very smart = very easy to train as long as you don't kill the drives and create poor habits by improper corrections for natural behaviors!!

Peace

Blacat
 

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Huskies can be tough at that age. They can be pushy and stubborn and too smart for their own good. What exercise does he get besides the walks? I'm pretty sure he's playing when he does this. I have seen this behavior in huskies a lot. Huskies can be really mouthy and very athletic. He has made this game to make walks more interesting. It sounds like he's bored and needs more to do.
 

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As for exercise, I actually wanted to buy a bike attachment kinda soon so I could bike with him, but I guess I should hold off on that. How old is old enough for that?
Its generally recommended to wait for "hard" exercise-- repetitive, on-leash running or similar -- until a dog is full grown. Medium sized dog, that's likely to be around 14-18 months of age. I haven't been able to find a lot of studies on this in dogs, but from a basic physiological standpoint it makes sense.

Not fully developed joints and tendons and bones are at a higher risk of stress injuries in young human athletes, its why the very competitive Little League teams have pitchers ending up with shoulder surgery and such at 14 years old when a 20 or 21 year old athlete on a college team isn't running into the same problems as quickly (basically). Or why horses started working hard under saddle at 2 years old end up with different (and usually more) joint problems than horses stared at 5 years old and doing the same sports.

Instead of a bike attachment that basically forces the dog to heel close to the bike, maybe look into "bikejoring" and if you're in a snowy place, "skijoring" where you can take advantage of the typical husky's desire to pull. You can start training the verbal commands and walking/light jogging behind the dog before the dog is fully ready to pull and then move on to having him pull a bike or scooter. A few members here do bikejoring-- here's a link to a thread where it's discussed http://www.dogforums.com/dog-sports-show-forum/136834-bikejoring-scootering.html
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Huskies play terribly rough. You may think it's meanness, but really it's likely just him having no idea how strong he is. My girl was a little under 40 pounds, a scrawny little thing, and she would leave marks on me and scratches all up and down my arms and back. They are known for that.

As for licking your lips, that's actually a sign of stress in dogs. In horses it's calm, but in dogs it's generally anxiety. And dogs tend to read our body language as us, not as them. They know the difference between a human and a dog.
And the pack leader stuff, like shell said, is bunk. You're your dogs parent, his leader, his caretaker and that's all you ever need to be. Your thumbs automatically give you that.

Huskies are one of two things; either they are highly and easily excitable or highly sensitive. Some huskies the mouth holding and the smacking would cause them to be completely afraid, and other, like your boy, will see that as you engaging in their rough play. And yes it will make it worse.

You are doing right by ignoring him when he jumps at you. Overall, that is the best thing to do. Ignore him until he quits, then proceed with what you were doing. And the same with playing. Instead of using your hands, use a toy or something to tug with and fight over, and if he gets too rough, stop playing with him. Be constant and consistent in this and he will learn his boundaries, that if he gets too rough then all the fun stops.
I'm really surprised the dog training instructor told me the licking your lips thing if it's a sign of stress... now I wonder if I should believe anything she taught in the class... well now I know, thanks!

I do ignore him as best I can but sometimes it's near impossible. His behavior is different when he's outside vs. inside. Often if I go in our backyard (which is fenced in btw) to do some yard work, he'll chase me and go crazy with the biting and the jumping even though I'm not even looking at him or moving toward him at all. He'd never do that in the house. I can't turn my back and ignore him because that doesn't stop him from jumping and biting, and there's nothing I can put between us to stop him. I don't know what about this is fun for him if I'm not participating... and I know you're right, it's not meanness, but it definitely seems that way when I feel like he's beating up on me unprovoked. Sometimes I'll drag the stupid baby gate around when I'm outside so he won't try anything. I feel silly for depending on a baby gate.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I read the first 3 paragraphs of the "long story" at this point. The puppy was only 4 months when it began, sounds like it needed to bite something and play - walks can get BORING. The way you described stepping on leash ect.. I would say wrong move for such a young or for that matter any dog, ever hear of OPPOSITION REFLEX?

Your pup sounds fun, and very smart = very easy to train as long as you don't kill the drives and create poor habits by improper corrections for natural behaviors!!

Peace

Blacat
I didn't start the stepping on his leash thing until around 6 months. The dog training instructor told me to try that--she said it's important I don't let him get away with biting, so I should physically stop him from doing it by standing on his leash. I haven't heard of opposition reflex but I just read a little about it... are you saying I conditioned him to jump up or something?

He is SO SMART! =) And yes very easy to train, he picks up on what I want him to do pretty quickly. And he's lots of fun as long as he doesn't get overexcited which can happen easily.
 

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I'm really surprised the dog training instructor told me the licking your lips thing if it's a sign of stress... now I wonder if I should believe anything she taught in the class... well now I know, thanks!
Going off this portion of your comments--
he's just at that adolescent age and fighting for dominance. She told me to make sure I'm calm at all times and to lick my lips when he's looking at me because that's dog language for "I don't mean any harm".
I'm going to hazard a guess that the instructor is "old school" and working with dominance theory (debunked). So I personally wouldn't put much stock in advice given during that class.

A dog licking lips is kind of stress/discomfort which does overlap a bit into the "no harm" because a dog who is stressed is going to likely also be trying to keep the peace. But it doesn't translate for a human licking their lips, humans recreating dog body language doesn't get "read" by the dog the same way it would between two dogs. For example, my dog Eva licks her lips over and over in the night if she needs to go potty, its a weird tell for needing to pee, but its basically that physical discomfort is causing her stress.

Here's a handy little info sheet on some common body language


Turid Rugaas is a very good resource on dog calming signals/body language, look up her book "On Talking Terms with Dogs" (online ordering, library or ebook) as well as some online articles she's written
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Huskies can be tough at that age. They can be pushy and stubborn and too smart for their own good. What exercise does he get besides the walks? I'm pretty sure he's playing when he does this. I have seen this behavior in huskies a lot. Huskies can be really mouthy and very athletic. He has made this game to make walks more interesting. It sounds like he's bored and needs more to do.
My husband tries to play fetch with him outside; I gave up on doing that since he's really not interested in fetch for more than one or two throws, after that it seems like he just realized he could be doing something more fun like jumping and biting, so that's what he does. He does this to my husband too, he just puts up with it for longer because he likes to be a feel-no-pain manly man. I tried rewarding him for bringing the toy back or going to get it with treats but he's usually more interested in biting.

I used to take him to the dog park once a week or more (started that as soon as he was old enough and vaccinated per the dog park's rules; I think he was around 3-4 mos?) but for the past month or so I can't take him... long story short, every time I go lately there is ALWAYS this one yellow lab about his age who instigates rough play CONSTANTLY and doesn't stop instigating even if he's whining from our boy having a vice grip on his neck. His owner doesn't like it (and it probably is too rough) so we have to break them up and keep them on leashes. Now ours is used to rough play and HE'S the instigator at the dog park =( he used to come when called at the dog park like 80% of the time, now it's almost never. I hate to deprive him of socialization and all the fun he could be having but I can't have him being a nuisance there and possibly getting kicked out. Not sure what to do there either... =(
 

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I didn't start the stepping on his leash thing until around 6 months. The dog training instructor told me to try that--she said it's important I don't let him get away with biting, so I should physically stop him from doing it by standing on his leash. I haven't heard of opposition reflex but I just read a little about it... are you saying I conditioned him to jump up or something?

He is SO SMART! =) And yes very easy to train, he picks up on what I want him to do pretty quickly. And he's lots of fun as long as he doesn't get overexcited which can happen easily.
I've noticed sometimes instructors are dingus' and instead of addressing the root of problem, they advise you to "step" on a leash so, idk you perhaps stop playing tug with your pooch. Although I maybe wrong 99% of behavioral issues we have with our dogs we taught. Like biting at the leash, puppies like to play and they prey DUMB. Meaning the leash swaying back and forth, back and forth, looks like a wonderful thing to pounce and bite. It's soft, and than your pooch is rewarded with a game of TUG with you fighting to get the leash out of its mouth. Than worse of all you probably for awhile had a tendency to bend over a remove it from your dogs mouth, which now is another form of reinforcement; physical praise I.E. petting. Than perhaps once or twice you said "no" and being a woman with a high pitched voice and a dog unable to associate no is bad, you may have well been saying GOOD.

Here's the simple version:

Something to bite, tug, touch, good.

I differ from your instructor where I would give him positive play time with a specified toy, and I would play with him and train him.

Walks to me are not as crucial as playing and training.

I believe walks should be enjoyable for me and the dog, and such a young dog Definitely nothing over 20 minutes.

Blacat
 

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My husband tries to play fetch with him outside; I gave up on doing that since he's really not interested in fetch for more than one or two throws, after that it seems like he just realized he could be doing something more fun like jumping and biting, so that's what he does. He does this to my husband too, he just puts up with it for longer because he likes to be a feel-no-pain manly man. I tried rewarding him for bringing the toy back or going to get it with treats but he's usually more interested in biting.

I used to take him to the dog park once a week or more (started that as soon as he was old enough and vaccinated per the dog park's rules; I think he was around 3-4 mos?) but for the past month or so I can't take him... long story short, every time I go lately there is ALWAYS this one yellow lab about his age who instigates rough play CONSTANTLY and doesn't stop instigating even if he's whining from our boy having a vice grip on his neck. His owner doesn't like it (and it probably is too rough) so we have to break them up and keep them on leashes. Now ours is used to rough play and HE'S the instigator at the dog park =( he used to come when called at the dog park like 80% of the time, now it's almost never. I hate to deprive him of socialization and all the fun he could be having but I can't have him being a nuisance there and possibly getting kicked out. Not sure what to do there either... =(
I see a bunch of No-No's in here too. Check out Leesbergs bite page, and make an educated decision if you want to put yourself in that predicament, or even worse make your pup dog-aggressive.

And playing FETCH is BITING you guys just aren't being active enough.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Its generally recommended to wait for "hard" exercise-- repetitive, on-leash running or similar -- until a dog is full grown. Medium sized dog, that's likely to be around 14-18 months of age. I haven't been able to find a lot of studies on this in dogs, but from a basic physiological standpoint it makes sense.

Not fully developed joints and tendons and bones are at a higher risk of stress injuries in young human athletes, its why the very competitive Little League teams have pitchers ending up with shoulder surgery and such at 14 years old when a 20 or 21 year old athlete on a college team isn't running into the same problems as quickly (basically). Or why horses started working hard under saddle at 2 years old end up with different (and usually more) joint problems than horses stared at 5 years old and doing the same sports.

Instead of a bike attachment that basically forces the dog to heel close to the bike, maybe look into "bikejoring" and if you're in a snowy place, "skijoring" where you can take advantage of the typical husky's desire to pull. You can start training the verbal commands and walking/light jogging behind the dog before the dog is fully ready to pull and then move on to having him pull a bike or scooter. A few members here do bikejoring-- here's a link to a thread where it's discussed http://www.dogforums.com/dog-sports-show-forum/136834-bikejoring-scootering.html
Thanks for the tips! I really didn't think I could go bikejoring with him since I thought I'd need two dogs to do that. I read somewhere that a husky can pull 1.5x his weight (I assume that's the limit without injuring himself somehow). He's 62lbs now and I read adult males are 60-80lbs. So even if he's a big boy at 80lbs later I thought that meant the most he should pull is 120lbs... I wish I was that light but sadly I am not! Plus a bike doesn't weigh nothing. I also kinda thought people who saw us bikejoring might think "ugh, some people are so lazy they refuse to walk their dog and just make them pull them around instead! Poor dog!" I've seen a few pictures of one uh... large person... being pulled by a single dog, and I thought that can't be good for the dog... anyway, clearly I must be wrong. I'll read the post, thank you =)
 

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Thanks for the tips! I really didn't think I could go bikejoring with him since I thought I'd need two dogs to do that. I read somewhere that a husky can pull 1.5x his weight (I assume that's the limit without injuring himself somehow). He's 62lbs now and I read adult males are 60-80lbs. So even if he's a big boy at 80lbs later I thought that meant the most he should pull is 120lbs... I wish I was that light but sadly I am not! Plus a bike doesn't weigh nothing. I also kinda thought people who saw us bikejoring might think "ugh, some people are so lazy they refuse to walk their dog and just make them pull them around instead! Poor dog!" I've seen a few pictures of one uh... large person... being pulled by a single dog, and I thought that can't be good for the dog... anyway, clearly I must be wrong. I'll read the post, thank you =)
Out of curiosity, does the "dogs can pull twice their weight" thing mean they can pull twice their weight across the ground with resistance, or twice their weight if the weight is on wheels?

I could *never* move 320 lbs on a pallet across the ground, but I can push/pull my 3,800 lb car by myself.
 

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Out of curiosity, does the "dogs can pull twice their weight" thing mean they can pull twice their weight across the ground with resistance, or twice their weight if the weight is on wheels?

I could *never* move 320 lbs on a pallet across the ground, but I can push/pull my 3,800 lb car by myself.
That's my understanding is that the big difference it pulling something on wheesl vs a weight with resistance. With a bike, you can assist with the pedals as needed like uphills but with a scooter, its easier to bail off so its safer for the human if you're not really steady on a bike and the dog maybe isn't perfectly trained.

Note that I don't bikejor or scooter, this is just general observation and word of mouth. I have done weight pull which is of course not the same as running with pulling weight, but for the short distances of weight pull, dogs can pull many times their body weight. I fostered a little pit bull that was maybe 40 lbs max and she'd pull about 400 lbs (figuring in resistance) around the training room before a class for a good 10 minutes (helped her focus in class)
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Out of curiosity, does the "dogs can pull twice their weight" thing mean they can pull twice their weight across the ground with resistance, or twice their weight if the weight is on wheels?

I could *never* move 320 lbs on a pallet across the ground, but I can push/pull my 3,800 lb car by myself.
I have no idea =) I am in no way an expert, I have to rely on research and forums like this one. I just read something else that says "Dogs in good condition can comfortably pull 2-3 times their body weight over moderate to long distance. Offroad and extremely hilly terrain reduce this by 1/3 to 1/2." (http://www.pulldogs.com/Dog_Cart_Frequently_Asked_Q.html) So I don't know what to believe anymore. All I know is I don't want to injure my dog or cause health problems over time by having him pull too much. If anybody has a solid answer I'd love to hear it.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I've noticed sometimes instructors are dingus' and instead of addressing the root of problem, they advise you to "step" on a leash so, idk you perhaps stop playing tug with your pooch. Although I maybe wrong 99% of behavioral issues we have with our dogs we taught. Like biting at the leash, puppies like to play and they prey DUMB. Meaning the leash swaying back and forth, back and forth, looks like a wonderful thing to pounce and bite. It's soft, and than your pooch is rewarded with a game of TUG with you fighting to get the leash out of its mouth. Than worse of all you probably for awhile had a tendency to bend over a remove it from your dogs mouth, which now is another form of reinforcement; physical praise I.E. petting. Than perhaps once or twice you said "no" and being a woman with a high pitched voice and a dog unable to associate no is bad, you may have well been saying GOOD.

Here's the simple version:

Something to bite, tug, touch, good.
This makes a lot of sense... I didn't consider that he might be bored and wanting to play on walks--I thought he loved walks, especially since we do different routes each day. He's always wanting to sniff at everything so I thought it was interesting for him and he was enjoying himself.

I believe walks should be enjoyable for me and the dog, and such a young dog Definitely nothing over 20 minutes.
Do you mean 20 mins/day or 20 mins/walk? In other words, do you think I should do 2 shorter walks per day, or is just one 20 min walk ok?
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I see a bunch of No-No's in here too. Check out Leesbergs bite page, and make an educated decision if you want to put yourself in that predicament, or even worse make your pup dog-aggressive.
Leesbergs bite page... is that a sticky in here somewhere? I Googled that and didn't get anything...

Sorry if I should know and I'm just ignorant =/
 
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