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So, I am beginning the journey to find a second dog. But I have no idea what would breed would work for me, I have some breeds I like but not sure if they would do well. So to explain, first, I live in an apartment with my fiancé, we both talked about it and want a big dog, I have a senior jack Russell and chihuahua mix, but she is now too old and tired to join me when I go out to rollerblade. My apartments do not have a weight restriction for dogs. But I am worried about the energy level of another dog, I am wanting something that will be calm in the apartment but will have the energy to come with me when I go rollerblading and can go on longer walks with me(my senior only makes it about 4 blocks before she gives up on the walk). My fiancé really wants something like a lab or rotty, but all of those breeds I met are ridiculously hyper. Anyone have suggestions?
 

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Since you don't have a particular breed in mind how about checking your local shelters for a young adult dog. You'll get a better idea of the personality of an adult dog vs a puppy and you'll be able to exercise with the dog right away rather than having to wait for the puppy to grow up.
 

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I have talked to the only shelter within three hours of me. I do not trust the shelter at all, they refused to let us take the dogs out or watch someone else take them outside, it was a dirty shelter and we were told that they do not take the dogs outside even to go to the bathroom because they don’t have the time to. I would prefer to stay away from that shelter and that’s the only one near me.
 

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A Greyhound might be a good fit. You can try looking up a retired racing Greyhound rescue and see if there is one anywhere near you. Nice dogs who can be great couch potatoes. They would also appreciate a good sprint before crashing for the day. Maybe an adult Collie who isn't a known barker? They can be barky (bad for apartments) but are pretty good to go and chill.

I also agree with an older dog. I don't know where you are that there are no shelters but try looking for local re-homes or check breeders for adult "retired" dogs of the breeds you may be interested in. Puppies are just soo much energy and no matter the breed they can't do a whole lot of exercising until they are full grown. Plus I don't recommend them for apartments due to the large amounts of screaming that can occur before they are have figured out the crate isn't going to kill them.

I also don't think a breed such as Rott, Dobe, Shepherds, Pit types etc are a good idea for apartments purely because of the restrictions that often end up being a thing if they aren't already.
 

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My first thought was a Greyhound, as well. The only concern I would have is that some off-track dogs can have very high prey drive. That said, a good rescue that rehomes retired racers will evaluate each dog to see if they can get along with smaller dogs and cats.

Labs and Rotties can have really high exercise requirements. Also, with Rotties, there is a good chance you'll run into breed restrictions when renting apartments, even if there isn't a weight limit stated.
 

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If you rollerblade most days of the week, you'll probably meet the physical exercise requirements of most dogs. Your have a dog already, so you are already aware that it'll be your responsibility to take the dog out regularly for a potty. So, I think your set as far as that goes.

I have doggy-sit a black lab and a rottweiller (both adults; different owners). The lab stayed in my home, was calm and extremely well behaved. I stayed with the rotty at her house. She was and indoor/outdoor dog that would sometimes get rambunctious. She'd attempt to jump on me when I walked out to be with her in the backyard. Inside, if I was sitting on the sofa, she would want to snuggle close, often trying to sit on my lap. She was often ignored, so I think she was just starved affection. I believe if her owner had done a better job of training, she would have been a perfectly well-behaved indoor pooch.

In short, I don't think size nor activity needs would prevent you from having a good apartment dog, so long as you made sure to take care of the dogs needs.

In your situation, my concerns would be as follows:

I would worry that an aging dog, especially an aging Jack Russell terrier, may not like sharing his space and his people with another dog. I'd also be concerned that a big dog (or big puppy) could accidentally hurt the old guy even if the Jack was accepting of the new dog.

While people do it, I personally cannot imagine raising up a puppy in an apartment, especially if you are not a 24/7 stay-at-home doggy mom. My last dog cried loudly every night for weeks when we first adopted him as a pup. I bet that would not go over well with neighbors who are only a few yards and a thin wall away. And then there is the chewing (of your stuff and your landlord's property) that first year or so until the pup is done with teething and has learned what is and is not okay to gnaw on.

BTW, my last two dogs were both German shepherd mixes, raised separately but with similar outcomes. They both had 24/7 access to the backyard, yet they both preferred to be in our tiny house with their people. Once grown, they spent most of their time indoors being calm, loving, respectful household members. The first year or so with both dogs was an indoor challenge. They were big, clumsy pups. They'd slam into walls as they tried to run around corners, skid on the linoleum and bang into chairs or table legs, knock things off coffee table with their tails and all that other fun, hyper puppy stuff.
 

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Thank you all for the advice, there is a greyhound rescue about 6 hours from me, but my fiancé doesn’t want one because he wouldn’t be comfortable roughhousing with one because “he will break it” lol. I also agree with the puppy advice y’all gave me, I’m not a big “puppy person” either. Bella (my jack mix) has been with other dogs quite a bit and she loves the company.
 

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Thank you all for the advice, there is a greyhound rescue about 6 hours from me, but my fiancé doesn’t want one because he wouldn’t be comfortable roughhousing with one because “he will break it” lol. I also agree with the puppy advice y’all gave me, I’m not a big “puppy person” either. Bella (my jack mix) has been with other dogs quite a bit and she loves the company.
Greyhounds are not small dogs - if he's roughhousing enough to "break" a greyhound, he is being way too rough lol. Greyhounds play with others dogs just like any other dog, and their bodies (including their long legs) take a tremendous amount of stress racing and, for the most part, hold up just fine.

Out of all of my dogs, I play the roughest with my 15lb, thin boned poodle mix. I don't hurt him.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you all for the advice, there is a greyhound rescue about 6 hours from me, but my fiancé doesn’t want one because he wouldn’t be comfortable roughhousing with one because “he will break it” lol. I also agree with the puppy advice y’all gave me, I’m not a big “puppy person” either. Bella (my jack mix) has been with other dogs quite a bit and she loves the company.
Greyhounds are not small dogs - if he's roughhousing enough to "break" a greyhound, he is being way too rough lol. Greyhounds play with others dogs just like any other dog, and their bodies (including their long legs) take a tremendous amount of stress racing and, for the most part, hold up just fine.

Out of all of my dogs, I play the roughest with my 15lb, thin boned poodle mix. I don't hurt him.
Lol! That’s what I told him, he still thinks they look fragile. I would be more worried of blading with one and having it spot something and take off with me.
 

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Something to keep in mind is that puppy shouldn't be going roller blading with you for more than a few blocks until they are over a year old, closer to 2 years for larger dogs. Are there any rescues around you other than the shelter? Have you looked on Petfinder.com?

Otherwise, most adult dogs that have had their physical and mental needs taken care of will generally be calm in the house. Collies may be a good fit, certainly something to look into. They're generally easy going, not known for their prey-drive (although dogs of any breed can have prey-drive), are often calm in the house but energetic outside. Chinooks might be another option - they were originally bred as all-purpose sled dogs but there is now a pretty big range in drives and temperaments, depending on what you're looking for.

Depending on how you feel about grooming (and the climate where you live) a standard poodle, eurasier, finnish lapphund, or samoyed could be a good fit, although none but the poodle would be particularly energetic in warm weather.
 

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Petfinder.com.

The only reason I would look into a breeder is if I was dead set on a specific breed... and considering that it can take 2 years to get a puppy from a responsible breeder, and it's expensive, I always go the rescue route instead.
 

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[I am a broken record... ;-) ] I recommend a 3 - 5yo Lab or Lab mix. A rescue can point you to a compatible personality, but Labs were bred to be adaptable, so you can train many Lab mixes to fit your lifestyle. Young Labs are high energy, but as Gingerkid suggests, if you walk most Labs for about 30 min., twice a day, they can be calm ( or sleep) in the house for the rest of the day.

My 3.5yo Lab mix gets two walks every day, then sleeps in his bed for the rest of the day. To help tire him even more, I try to schedule 2 - 3 play sessions a week with other dogs. If I were to run him, I could probably skip a walk or play session for that day.

Regardless of the breed, be sure to go gradually to condition him for the weather, and for the distance, just like you would for any athlete. Most Labs love water, as well as cold weather, but as the temperature climbs over 80 degrees, dogs overheat quickly, requiring water breaks. Conditioning can help the dog get used to the heat.
 

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I have a longhaired whippet, now known as Windsprite. He’s small at 30lbs, many are bigger. He’s quiet & would be a great apartment dog and he would love to go rollerblading!
 
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