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We tell people her parents were labradoodles, which leads to confused looks. After much googling, I guess some doodles just turn out like this. The others I have found look almost exactly like her. It's lke they are a little sub breed upto themselves!



 

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It's funny you mentioned Boykin Spaniel, that's exactly what we thought too. I was completely unconvinced the breeder didn't have a boykin jump her fence or something until I really researched it. best examples I found of other completely not labradoodle labradoodles:

http://disc.yourwebapps.com/discussion.cgi?disc=179154;article=139721;title=Doodle Breeders' Discussion Forum
http://www.rutlandmanor.com/coatscolours-updated.html
Second one, scroll down to "rare throwback coat", not sure if the link will do it automatically.
 

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I would still never think in a million years those were Labradoodles as I've only seen them in curly and wooly form. And Australian Labradoodle? Kind of sounds made up to me, no offense. Yours does look like the one in the "throwback coat" picture. But I thought they were supposed to be curly or wooly always. This is weird, but I guess if it says so, it is.

Thanks for sharing something new with me. :)
 

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It was completely new to me too! I expected her to be all curly and wooly too, as she looked like the rest of her litter when she was a pup except a little straighter. We choose a labradoodle because I'm slightly allergic to dogs and ofcourse she sheds so now I spend my life vacuuming and dooing laundry, but it's worth it! :)
 

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Yeah that's why I backed out of getting a Cockapoo because they said once they grow up, you don't know whether you're getting the Cocker Spaniel part or Poodle part. And just like you, I too, am allergic to all dogs, that's why I went with a Coton De Tulear as they don't shed. Dogs are great companions! And wow, you are fast with responses, lol. I just finished looking at something and bam, you had a response up. Wow--you're quick, but quick is always good. :)
 

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considering she is a mix, of a mix. genetics will play a big roll. they can and do look different alot. we have one that comes in the shop that looks like a borzoi.

when dealing with mixes, you never know what you will get.
 

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I would still never think in a million years those were Labradoodles as I've only seen them in curly and wooly form. And Australian Labradoodle? Kind of sounds made up to me, no offense. Yours does look like the one in the "throwback coat" picture. But I thought they were supposed to be curly or wooly always. This is weird, but I guess if it says so, it is.

Thanks for sharing something new with me. :)
Australian Labradoodles are very real, with lots of ethical breeders. Tho they can't yet be found outside of Australia.
 

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When you combine breeds and breed mixed breed dogs, you get variety! Simple as that. More so with different coat types like a lab and a poodle. I know of a labradoodle that had a wire coat, almost like a wolfhound or terrier was in there somewhere - it didn't need to be trimmed at all, just had a light spatter of wirey hair.
 

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Australian Labradoodles are very real, with lots of ethical breeders. Tho they can't yet be found outside of Australia.
Just as an FYI - they changed the "breed" name, what used to be the "Australian Labradoodle" is now the "cobbadog". The ANKC will not let a new breed be registered if it's name is made up with the names of other breeds, it needs an original name.

Regarding how ethical they are though... Hmmmmm not so sure!! The "Australian Labradoodle/Cobbadog" breeders I have seen here in NZ often have like 5 litters on the ground at a time, not even slightly ethical in my book.
 

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Australian Labradoodles are very real, with lots of ethical breeders. Tho they can't yet be found outside of Australia.
I actually have a friend in VA who has one, I think from a breeder in state somewhere. It did sound like a pretty ethical breeder (health testing and such), although he was neutered before she took him home at 8 weeks.
 

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considering she is a mix, of a mix. genetics will play a big roll. they can and do look different alot. we have one that comes in the shop that looks like a borzoi.

when dealing with mixes, you never know what you will get.
So true. If one parent was a pure Lab an one parent was a pure Poodle then the puppies would have a much more predictable phenotype (appearance) than offspring of two Labradoodles. Its basic genetics. Your dog probably has inherited more of the Lab genes than the Poodle's.
 

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yup, there are a few australian labradoodle breeders in north america, they imported their stock and they almost always spay/neuter the pups before they leave.

and ys, you mix dogs you can get anything, when people tell me hey want a goldendoodle because of of one looks like and they like it, I feel like gatheirng up all the goldendoodles at work and take a pic of them together, because most of them look NOTHING alike, there are small fluffy ones, huge wiry ones, ones that look like Goldens with fluffy ears etc.. all are exactly the same mix. saem with the labaradoodles, we have several that come to work who's only "poodle" feature is a narrower frame lol
 

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I would still never think in a million years those were Labradoodles as I've only seen them in curly and wooly form. And Australian Labradoodle? Kind of sounds made up to me, no offense. Yours does look like the one in the "throwback coat" picture. But I thought they were supposed to be curly or wooly always. This is weird, but I guess if it says so, it is.

Thanks for sharing something new with me. :)
Australian Labradoodles started out as poodle/lab crosses, but people have added other breeds as well to improve coat type and temperament, and they now breed true. There's a breed club for them (working towards official recognition, I believe) and their breeders are very concerned with health and genetics. The dogs are quite different from the lab/poodle crosses sold as Labradoodles elsewhere. From here:

The Australian Labradoodle is different from all other labradoodles.

In the early days, the Australian Labradoodle was simply a cross between a Labrador Retriever and a Standard Poodle. Dogs from this cross typically were bred to each other over future generations, whereby the Australian dogs are also know as "Multi-generational" Labradoodles.

Then, in the late 1980's, Tegan Park and Rutland Manor, the two founders of the Australian Labradoodle as we know it today, began carefully infusing several other breeds into early generations of their Lab/Poodle crosses, to improve temperament, coat, confirmation, and size. The infused breeds include Irish Water Spaniel as well as the American and English Cocker Spaniel. The resulting labradoodles subsequently have been bred to each other, continuing the multi-generational tradition.

Today, Australian Labradoodles are wonderful, intelligent dogs with lush coats that are more reliably low to non-shedding and allergy friendly than other types of Labradoodles such as first generation Lab/Poodle crosses, or first generation crosses bred back to Poodles. Even when the other types of Labradoodles are bred on for generations, the result is not an Australian Labradoodle, as the attributes of the infused breeds were not included in their ancestry.
With the normal (not Australian) labradoodles, you get interesting results when you breed two first-generation labradoodles together. From here:

A second generation Labradoodle is the result of a Labradoodle bred to a Labradoodle - and there are very few of these actually bred as the second generation hybrid is genetically the most varied generation possible. When breeding on, most Labradoodle breeders breed the second generation as a backcross instead.

Coat Maintenance: varies on the coat type
Coat Description: The coat can be a hair coat, wavy coat, or curly coat.
Shedding: varies greatly from shedders to nonshedders
Allergy Friendliness: not recommended for families with allergies, due to the varying coat types.
 

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The breeder I got her from is very ethical. She breeds both Australian Labradoodles (imported) and like alot of breeders "American Labradoodles" too, was generally are a mix of poodle, lab and cocker spaniel (to reduce size, improve coat). I'm not sure how I feel about the early spay/neuter thing, but it does indeed seem to be the norm.

The breeder has a small number of dogs, a few live with her and the rest have 'guardian homes" where they live as family pets except when they are breed. She health tests and raises the puppies in her home.

Mine however looks nothing like most labradoodles, american or austrailian, heh.
 

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Very pretty! :) I like the coloration.
 
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