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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I've had my puppy Buddha for a about a week and he is 11 weeks old, we named him Buddha because he's super duper calm...almost like he meditates...lol...since day one I've been rather strict with him, he doesn't get petted unless he perform i.e. Sits or comes or goes potty outside or into his kennel alone. He spends most his time in his kennel with hisNylaFloss and Kong Extreme, save the 30 minutes in the morning i walk and feed him the 20 minutes if playing with a toy and training in the after noon, 20 minutes during meal time in the evening with some more training, and 15 minutes to go potty right before bed. I don't let him enter spaces before me and when i'm holding the leash I've taught him not to yank and he pretty much can come when asked or encouraged with a tug. He understand Sit and Come and is starting to get Lay, but if there is a distraction around like my nephew or anything new all his training goes down the drain, even if i offer him his liver treats (which he loves!). When i try to walk him around anywhere other than the grass patch behind the house ( we live in a townhouse in a gated community by Universal Studios Orlando, Fl) he just plops down and wont walk no matter how much i bait him with treats (and he LOOOOVES treats) The same thing happens when it comes to stairs...he's terrified to even try to climb em. Another issue I'm worried about is him getting enough love from us :(. I want him to feel loved and part of the family, but i also want him well behaved and disciplines, I don't want him all over everything and eventually i want to be able to let him loose around the house when we are here. I feel bad because i snap on my family when they pet him for no reason and tell them they're spoiling him. But i know he's a potentially dangerous animal if not trained properly, He's a Pitbull :rockon: and if anything happens with him...no matter the circumstances, He will be blamed. I need to have him very disciplined so we can avoid that. I've googled and asked trainers how to handle him and the only common theme is the crate training technique amoung all of them, beyond that, all the advice i get or read (even on this forum) differs like night and day, from LEAD THE PACK type stuff to TREAT HIM AS YOU WOULD A CHILD to USE A SHOCK COLLAR or CHOKER....:(....I Feel overwhelmed and don't want to fail my puppy. I love him like he was my kid.

Also is it safe to leave him with his Nylafloss at this age unsupervised? He REALLY loves it.
 

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He's an 11 week old baby that you have only had for a week, the whole world to him is only 11 weeks of a brand new thing. Then you walk into the new world and all the baggage you bring. He's a pup, pups do no wrong. Be patient, you don't ask a 7 yr old child to dig ditches.

I'm not gonna confuse you more with actual training advice as you sound confused now.
 

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beyond that, all the advice i get or read (even on this forum) differs like night and day, from LEAD THE PACK type stuff to TREAT HIM AS YOU WOULD A CHILD to USE A SHOCK COLLAR or CHOKER.
Where on this forum has anyone suggested ANY of those things?

You've been reading the wrong forums.
 

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I know he's a baby....I'm just new at this and a bit overwhelmed

LOL...it was just examples of things from various sources. This forum is very pro Positive Reenforcement...Thats why i ask this question here.
 

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But i know he's a potentially dangerous animal if not trained properly, He's a Pitbull :rockon: and if anything happens with him...no matter the circumstances, He will be blamed. I need to have him very disciplined so we can avoid that.
This dog is 11 weeks, he needs very little if any discipline. What he REALLY needs is EXTENSIVE socialization. Keeping him in a crate for most of his day is not the way to go, nor is denying him ANY love and affection. My suggestion is to give him what he deserves.

Please keep reading THIS forum, and focus your training on positive-based methods. Thank you. :)
 

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I know he's a baby....I'm just new at this and a bit overwhelmed

LOL...it was just examples of things from various sources. This forum is very pro Positive Reenforcement...Thats why i ask this question here.
Not a big deal just relax and underwhelm yourself most of this stuff is common sense and there is no time clock involved. Right now for a couple weeks or so just work on the transition into your home and surroundings etc. on lead walking is good but no force no yanking as it's a pup. I like fun stuff with pups, not serious stuff.
 

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Not a big deal just relax and underwhelm yourself most of this stuff is common sense and there is no time clock involved. Right now for a couple weeks or so just work on the transition into your home and surroundings etc. on lead walking is good but no force no yanking as it's a pup. I like fun stuff with pups, not serious stuff.
Thank you! I will try.
So what should a regular day be like with him? i work from home usually so I'm always here :)
 

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It took Aidan a week to become accustomed to living here. Every day, he became more and more mischievous. A mischievous Aidan is a comfortable Aidan.

When Aidan was a baby puppy, my day was spent walking him, playing with him, feeding him, handling him affectionately, and watching him sleep in my lap, his crate, or on a pillow next to my desk. I taught him his name, to walk upstairs, to sit, and I rewarded him with a small treat when he came to me when I called him. I handled him frequently so that grooming, nail clipping, and vet visits would not be a problem. I started leash training him, and taught him to sit at the door so when he got older, I would not be bowled over by him during a race to go outside.

I did not make Aidan earn my affection. That is freely and frequently given.

I spend a lot of time keeping Aidan busy when he is awake. If I took my eye off him for one second, he'd chew everything in sight. He nipped a lot, too, which was a bloody pain. Both behaviors have since subsided a lot. I found out about bully sticks here, and that's what I give him. Now I buy the largest braided ones because they last the longest. If www.bestbullysticks.com had the bully sticks in the rawhide bone shape in stock, I'd get him those because they last a long time, too.

Aidan has to be kept occupied or he gets into mischief. I give him Kongs filled with liverwurst and his kibble, in alternating layers. Before I put liverwurst into Kongs, he ignored them. Aside from Kongs, a tired dog is a good dog. He is most tired out on days he goes to daycare. He goes twice a week for the purpose of socializing him with other dogs, and also to get him used to being separated from me. At the beginning, I stayed with him for an hour and left him for a couple of hours. Now he stays there for 6 hours, and I still spend about an hour there (coming and going) because I enjoy playing with the owners' dogs and watching Aidan interact with them.

At this point, Aidan is well socialized with other dogs, he naturally loves people, he is playful, affectionate, communicative, and he follows me everywhere. He is a great dog, and mischievous as all get out.

I started taking him to obedience school in July. He loves it. I am working on getting him to obey commands there like he does at home. He knows plenty of commands (25, I think), but is very distracted by the other dogs there. All he wants to do is play. If he has been to daycare that day, he is tired and obeys me in class.

I've become friends with 2 adult pit bulls at the dog daycare. They are just like Aidan in their personalities: Very friendly, affectionate, and playful. My biggest problem is fitting 2 pit bulls and Aidan in my lap at the same time. These dogs were well-socialized with other dogs and are well-trained. I had never met a pit bull before, and if I could convince the owners to give me their dogs, I'd take them home with me.
 

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Well the most important thing now is the housebreaking and were he my pup he would be taken out for duty run every 30 minutes. I have no problem picking pup up at 1st and pup has a flat buckle collar and a long 15 ft (at least) thin nylon cord lead you can make yourself.

You carry pup to area put him down and he is free to investigate the area with a dropped lead dragging. Usually at that age they are easy to catch so not a big problem. When he dumps etc he is made king of the world. I also crate break all dogs.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thank you for the insight! He sounds like a wonderful pup! How'd you teach him to climb stairs?
 

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I stood behind him, leaned over, and placed his feet where they should go. He got the idea after a few steps. I didn't have to teach him to go down the stairs. Soon afterward, I began wondering if he is part flying squirrel.

Aidan goes upstairs every time I do, and that's about it. Do not make the super stupid mistake I did, of racing your dog upstairs. Now he is learning to walk down on my right and up on my left (due to bannister placement). If he goes down or up first, he can run (or fly). If anyone is on the stairs, he must stay on his side of the stairs.

He likes to lie across a stair, for fun, to block me. I'm getting him out of that habit, too.
 

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wow!...it's amazing how smart dogs are! how old was he when you did all that?
 

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wow!...it's amazing how smart dogs are! how old was he when you did all that?
I've been doing it all along. Aidan was 8 weeks old when I got him. At first, I concentrated on housebreaking, crate training, and teaching him his name. When he was 10 weeks old, I started teaching him to sit. It took 3 weeks, and I was really worried that I had a dumb dog. Then a light bulb went off in his head. After that, he was much easier to train.

This does not mean that Aidan is Einstein. I spend a lot of time with him. He learns fairly quickly, but he is stubborn and easily distracted. He wants to train me. He is not food driven at all, which does not help. I used to think he was toy-driven, because he loves to play, but that is not it. Aidan loves to have my attention, and I think that is his basic drive.

As long as I (or anyone) plays with him, trains him, grooms him, pets him, or walks him, he is a happy camper. He follows me around all day, and when I am busy, he naps or chews on his bully stick or Kong. When he wants attention, he asks for it, but it is not a continuous thing. I try to give him the attention he needs before he asks for it so he doesn't think I am the trainee. Fifteen to thirty minutes of playing/training/walking fills his tank for a couple of hours. Several times a day, when he is just lying around, I sit next to him and rub his tummy and stroke his back for a few minutes. He likes that a lot. If one of the kids takes him outside, I greet him with the same enthusiasm he greets us with when we come in. He likes that, too. He is a very affectionate dog.

Now that I've figured out that getting attention is what he likes most, I have noticed that he pays more attention to what I want him to do. For the past 4 days, all I have to do is make a hissing sound. If he is not next to me, he comes over, sits down in front of me, and looks at me like he is asking me what I want, and then he does what I tell him to do! If he is doing something mischievous, like counter cruising, he stops and does not resume that behavior. He isn't afraid of the sound, and I hope he continues to do this because he is much easier to handle now.

People are always surprised when they come to my house and I show off what Aidan can do. He performs beautifully inside our house only. Right now, I am concentrating on getting Aidan to pay attention to me when there are lots of people or other dogs around, and when we are outside. This has been an ongoing project since July. He is getting better at it, but progress is slow. The hissing sound works outside so far, but I haven't tried it at dog school yet. I give Aidan a very positive response when he responds to the hissing, and I make sure to smile a lot because I figure that's a cue to him that he is doing the right thing.

It all started with a can of compressed air, which is marketed as a dog training spray. I got it, used it a few times, and it worked. The next day, I didn't have the can with me and needed it, so I hissed, and that worked. I would not use compressed air near a young puppy or with a dog who is skittish or who is afraid of sudden noises. Aidan is not afraid of loud or sudden noises, he just needs something to divert his attention from things that are more interesting than me. BTW, when I did use the compressed air, I did not direct it toward the dog, or press all the way down on the button after the first time because it does make a very loud noise that the dog doesn't expect.
 

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I like the hissing. I believe that hissing makes a loud high-pitched sound that people can't hear. I know that I can whisper cues to my dog and get a response.

1. ... On the other hand, my dog was scared of stairs for about a month, and I didn't force him, until he was ready at about 16 weeks... but I don't have stairs where I live.
2. Dogs go thru a fear phase where new stuff can be scary. Continual, calm exposure will get her used to it.
3. Socialization with other dogs is critical. And, with Pits, they are allowed to play roughly (if OK with you), but not allowed to get over-excited - ever - that is one time when they can do injury, because they can play too roughly and won't stop.
Also, Look up Bite Inhibition (Sticky: The Bite Stops Here ... in the new owner section) Important to control biting strength.
4. Look up - NILIF - Nothing in Life Is Free. I think that is what you are doing. If you are doing this.. as opposed to withholding love and attention (subtle difference), then keep it up... highly recommended.... And keep enforcing it at home.
5. Despite media reputation, Pits are very loving dogs, and even though they are physically tough, you can "hurt their feelings." (I contrast this to Labs, who seem to forgive you even if you run over them with a truck :) ) So, don't let anyone yell at or hit your dog....
6. Slowly, re-teach him all the cues for distraction. He has to learn to come, even when a little girl with an ice cream cone is calling :)

I think you're on the right track.
 

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Keeping the poor thing in a kennel the majority of the time is not healthy. Please find a certified trainer, usually your vet can recommend or call local doggy daycare facility.
 
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