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1. Are you sure they are quarreling and not just playing roughly?
2. Regardless, it is fine for you to stop them when they get too rough for you... but then let them go back to playing.
3. Personally, I like dogs to play as roughly as they are comfortable with... within a set of rules that you define for your comfort level.
I have found that dogs that play roughly, but with inhibition and control, tend to be well-socialized and very slow to anger or fighting...
 

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1. Look for a playbow - where a dog will have his butt up and his front legs down... like a bow. Dogs can also do this very quickly while running. Fighting dogs NEVER do a playbow.
2. Look for a wide open mouth with lower teeth exposed, and biting front legs or mouth. A serious fight will slash and most dogs can draw blood, if desired, before you can even move.
3. If you separate playing dogs, the victim will run back to the 'aggressor' to continue. With fighting dogs this can also happen, but the starting energy is usually greater.
4. Most family dogs will stop/separately if you clang two pots together... This may be excessive for some dogs.
5. Stopping and starting sounds like play. Quarreling is continuous, unless one gives up and leaves.
6. When they play, be alert for one of them shrieking, they can hurt each other by accident. If the aggressor backs off, that's OK. Sometimes things can escalate, if one gets hurt....
7. After playing/tussling, dogs will be tired, calm, and may go to sleep. (You could get slobbered on :)
8. After fighting, dogs will be full of adrenaline, anxious, may be tired, but not calm or happy.
 
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