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Discussion Starter #1
Thank you for reading my post, it’s a long one. I would like your comments on my situation and I will do my best to be bias and give a true picture of my husband’s point of view in this matter.
It’s hard to know were to begin. My husband and I got our first and only dog the year we were married. Our dog Jack was born when we were on our honeymoon. We were very devoted to Jack our lab-collie mix. Jack had many health and behavior issues especially as he got older. He was a dominant, slightly aggressive dog but I took the role of the “alpha dog”. After about five years our first son was born.
My husband took over the role of his caretaker while I took care of the baby and battled post partum depression. My husband resented me for pushing Jack aside so I could care for our son and myself. I loved Jack but it became harder not to resent him for hating our baby. He was very jealous of our son and we could not leave them in the same room together. He growled every time our son came near.
Other problem made the situation more difficult because Jack had severe epilepsy, pancreatitis, and severe seasonal allergies that would make his paws very infected every spring. Even though he was difficult we could not give up Jack. He was a family member, he was there first and he needed us. Jack’s liver started to fail due to all the medications he was on and sadly we put him to sleep in 2003. He was 10 years old.
My husband swore we would never have another dog again, he was so heart broken and the experience of having such a difficult dog left both of us completely turned off from having another dog again. I have changed my mind since and feel almost ready for a dog to join our family. I am not planning to jump into this without some through education, patience and full support from my husband.
Here is what is different about out situation and what I plan to do differently hoping my husband will come around and support me in getting a dog for our family:

1. I would like to get a puppy when my boys are 5 and 11 years old. (summer 2010)
2. I have been researching breeds and breeders to find the best dog for our family. I am strongly thinking of a mix breed like a schnoodle. My husband doesn’t like small dogs but I think this hybrid might be best for our family.
3. I am done having children.
4. I am excited to be the caretaker of our dog and realize I will be the main caregiver.
5. I am a school teacher so I am off all summer. This will give me time to house break and train our puppy. (Just hoping for good timing so puppy comes home when school lets out.
6. My husband is a landscaper and he is off from Christmas till April.
7. The months in between I will have help from my in-laws who live next door and my parents. I am also looking into dog-walkers and even doggie daycare.
8. Our friends said they would watch our dog as we have cared for theirs recently when they went on a week vacation..
9. I will have doggie insurance this time.
10. I miss having a dog.
 

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Before you bring another dog home, I think you need to meditate on what you posted here. Dogs are what their owners make them. Sure, there are some genetic influences but dogs are what WE, their OWNERS shape them to be. You talk about your previous dog with such disdain...like HE was the only problem. And that makes me sad.

I would recommend the book, The Other End of the Leash by Patricial McConnell. And some soul searching. Unless you chnage your perspective, your new dog could end up just like your old dog. Then what would you do.

"They are your friend, your partner, your protector. You are their life, their love, their leader. They will be yours, faithful and true...to the last beat of their heart. We owe it to them to be worthy of such devotion."
 

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Maybe if you were able to take him to a shelter/rescue to help a needy dog, maybe his heart could be won over? You might not get a puppy though, so that may not be what you want.
Just a thought.
 

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There's no such thing as a Hybrid. It's a mixed breed. You can get the same health problems with a mixed breed that you can get with a purebred. As far as allergies go, many of those are food induced. Commit to feeding a good quality food, which usually isn't found at your grocery store, but at a Feed store/agriculture supply store/pet shop.

I would either buy a quality purebred from a good breeder, or get a mixed breed puppy from a rescue. I can't knowing support "designer dog" BYBs or pet shop puppy mill dogs.

Your plan sounds like it would work to me. But make absolutely sure you get your husband 100% on board. And you need to be prepared to be 100% caregiver.
 

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I agree with spotted nike's post.

Labradoodles are cute and everything, but they are not a 'hybrid' or a 'designer' dog. They are a mutt, a mixed breed of two different breeds of dogs. And almost all labradoodles come from backyard breeders, something you really shouldn't support.

If you want to raise a puppy, and you want a specific breed, there are others here that can help you find a reputable breeder, that does all the neccesary health testing, for whatever breed you are looking for and in whatever area you are located.

If you are not dead-set on a specific breed, you can always go down to the shelter, or a local rescue, and look into rescuing a dog in need. Many shelters and rescues have plenty of puppies, and many, many adult dogs, and some are even pure-breds. The good thing about an adult dog from a rescue, is that many are in foster homes and they can tell you the exact temperment of the dog. If they like children, noises, cats, dogs, strangers, hyper or laid back, with aggression issues, ect. With an adult, and especially a rescue in a foster home, you will basically know exactly what you are getting. Plus you'll get the chance to bring the kids along, and see how the dog interacts with the children.

And I also agree, do your homework before getting a dog, and the requirements needed as a caregiver, and in important areas like training and health. Also make sure that your husband fully agree's, with no doubts whatsoever, before beginning the search for your new dog.

Good luck! Dogs make life a lot more fun and entertaining, so hopefully you find the right pet for you and your family.
 

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So basically your asking if you should get a new dog and your husband is against it because he does not want to go through all the pain and sorrow that comes with the package of owning a great dog! Right?

I strongly shear your husband's feelings, and my wife and I went throught the same situation! My wife was just in the room and I ask her what her reply would be, and she took the noble way out, no comment! lol
I gave her a hundred reasons the night before (we were to pick the new pup up), why we should not get another dog or even think about it. She did not make any plans like you have, and her only reply is, " I want a dog"!.

So presently, one dog is seven and the other is nine, she won, She must have been banking on the assumption once we got the dog I could not turn my back on the dog and she is right. The dogs love her, but they worship me because of the care and time I spend with them. I won.t go into what all I do for these dogs, I could write a book, but they do affect my life, there is alot of adventurous things I would be doing if it were not for these dogs, but once committed, no turning back! I could have saved all these words by just saying you both have to aggree and shake on it sealed with a big kiss. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
I was considering a puppy from a rescue and that still might be a possibility. I found a breeder in pennsylvania that breeds schnoodles. Is this anything I should be concerned with. I would visit the breeder before any serious consideration. As far as purebreeds I know my husband likes beagles.
 

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I think reading books or articles on dog behavior and how to properly socialize dogs with children before you got another dog would be a good idea.
 

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If you want to have the best chance at avoiding a lot of health problems and possibly behavioral problems (ones that stem from genetics anyway) get a purebred puppy from a responsible breeder. You have plenty of time to research and find a good breeder of a breed you like. If you want a mixed breed, go to the shelter and adopt one rather than buying one from an unethical "breeder". Before you get a puppy you should first make sure everyone in the household is in agreement, including your husband. Perhaps researching breeds to find the one to best suit your home would be a good way to get him excited about it. If he does not like small breeds you might be better off looking into medium sized breeds. What specific things do you want in a dog?

Do you want a dog that is happy with a short walk everyday or one that needs a brisk long walk or run every day? Do you want a dog that could possibly be off leash with training? (a beagle is not one of those breeds). Do you want a breed that is "wash and go" or one that needs to go to the groomer monthly and be brushed out daily to every other day? Do you want one that needs to be mentally stimulated and can be taught tons of tricks, or one that less demanding in that department, ie: can learn a few tricks but won't need to be taught new things often.

Some other things to do prior to getting a puppy. Look into dog obedience schools and find one you like, puppy class and basic obedience can go a long way in making your dog a great pet. Find a vet. Research foods. Look up any dog laws in your area. Get your kids around dogs and teach them how to act around them. Buy a few books and read them. I highly recommend this one for your kids: http://dogwise.com/ItemDetails.cfm?ID=DTB1029. I would have them read it before getting the puppy. This one is good: http://www.dogwise.com/itemdetails.cfm?ID=DTB745 and this one: http://www.dogwise.com/ItemDetails.cfm?ID=DTB752
 

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The breeder that breeds Schnoodles is probably a BYB. Ask how many litters a yr they have, how many breeds, go see the facilities, ask for proff of breed specific health testing for problems common to each parent, etc. Ask to see the contract where they offer health guarentees, and a guarentee that they will tke the dog back at any time if it needs a home. A good breeder will do this.

Personally, anyone intentionally breeding mixed breed dogs is usually just out for $$$ and not looking out for the dogs.

Do a search on these forums for Designer dogs.




You might want to see if you can be a foster for a dog from a nearby rescue to "try out" dog ownership now that your kids are older. That way, if it wasn't what you thought, you can opt out of keeping him/her.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thank you all for your comments and suggestions. I think if purebred is the best way to go then I will start there. I will see if I can get any input from my husband and get a list of traits we think are important. I have tried some of those online breed selectors and I get results that are inconsistant or not what I was looking for. I will also mention fostering to him. I like that idea.
 

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Thank you all for your comments and suggestions. I think if purebred is the best way to go then I will start there. I will see if I can get any input from my husband and get a list of traits we think are important. I have tried some of those online breed selectors and I get results that are inconsistant or not what I was looking for. I will also mention fostering to him. I like that idea.
The fundamental difference between a purebred and a 'designer' mixed breed is consistency of type.

A purebred has generally consistent look and temperment...because 'shnoodles' are usually first or second generation crosses, the reality of genetic variation is that the traits of a shnoodle pup are a complete crapshoot. There is very little consistency. Any breeder who tells you otherwise is a liar and a cheat.

That plus the majority of 'doodle' breeders don't conduct proper health testing of breeding stock and charge exhorbitant prices for exaggerated claims such as 'hypoallergenic' and whatnot...when in reality the dogs are the aforementioned crapshoot.


A good question to ask yourself when trying to decide on breed is

"What do I expect from a dog?"
 

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Well at the very least at least get a medium to large dog(40 to 60 lbs) a little husband compromise. Worry less about breeds and more about individual dog as there are butthead type dogs in every breed. It sounds like you have a great plan and you're young, it would be a very long time without a dog if you decide not to get one.
 

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Before you bring another dog home, I think you need to meditate on what you posted here. Dogs are what their owners make them. Sure, there are some genetic influences but dogs are what WE, their OWNERS shape them to be. You talk about your previous dog with such disdain...like HE was the only problem. And that makes me sad.

I would recommend the book, The Other End of the Leash by Patricial McConnell. And some soul searching. Unless you chnage your perspective, your new dog could end up just like your old dog. Then what would you do.

"They are your friend, your partner, your protector. You are their life, their love, their leader. They will be yours, faithful and true...to the last beat of their heart. We owe it to them to be worthy of such devotion."
I agree but from reading her post it does sound different this time. They don't have a newborn and the OP has a detailed plan.
Edit: That said, I think you really need to make sure your husband is on board. Otherwise, it could turn out bad for everyone, including the dog.
 
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