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And when I say chickens, I mean live walking and eating beings. The dogs were in the back yard minding their own business when the chickens got into the yard. Not sure how, maybe squeezed through an openings and before I knew what was going on, my dogs had killed and started eating one and had another cornered and dying.

Should I worry now that the dogs are going to be aggressive? Someone said something about them getting the taste of blood. Also should I reimburse the neighbors? Their chickens came into my fenced in yard.
 

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I wouldn't worry about your dogs becoming aggressive - that's a myth. Lots of people raw feed and their puppers (and cats) are just as loving as usual :)

I don't know about the reimbursement - the chickens came into your yard.. I don't think you're at fault at all.
 

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Should I worry now that the dogs are going to be aggressive? Someone said something about them getting the taste of blood.
Aggressive towards who/what? I don't think you have to worry about your dogs suddenly being human or dog aggressive (if they weren't before) just because they killed a couple chickens. I wouldn't worry too much about it honestly. Just an unfortunate situation really.

I think many, many normal otherwise well-adjusted dogs would've done the same thing in that circumstance. I know mine would have. And he lives perfectly fine in the house with 3 cats. But when you're talking an unfamiliar animal outdoors, on their territory, it's a different ball game. My dog has chased down many a rabbit and squirrel in my backyard. Fortunately he's always been outrun/outmaneuvered. But there's no doubt in my mind he'd tear them to shreds if he ever caught one.

Also should I reimburse the neighbors? Their chickens came into my fenced in yard.
I personally don't think you necessarily OWE it to your neighbors to reimburse them for the chickens. As you said, they came onto your fenced in property. But if you can spare the coin and want to make a friendly gesture then that's a different story. To be absolutely frank this sounds more like your neighbor's problem (keeping their chickens properly secured) than your problem. Again, unfortunate situation. And I don't think it's necessarily anyone's "fault", particularly yours.
 

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I personally would not worry about dogs becoming agressive, or having a "taste" for blood. Most dogs have a natural 'prey' drive..its their canine extinct, no different than wanting to chase and kill a rabbit, or squirrell.. really. My dogs eat a raw meat diet, and they are far from aggressive or have a taste for blood. We raised chickens when we lived on a farm, and our farm dogs were a constant nuissance fixing themselves a snack from the chicken coupe.. they weren't blood thirsty, its just chickens are a really, really nutrient rich, yummy meal for them, and some dogs just have that natural 'hunt, chase, kill and eat' instinct.

As far as reimbursing your neighbors.. well I agree, their chickens escaped and theyre an easy meal for prey driven creatures... technically not really your or your dogs' faults.. however, if you have the means to reimburse and want to remain on the good side with your neighbor, I would offer to reimburse fully or partially, espeically if your neighbor heavily relies on these chickens for a source of income or food.

Just my thoughs.. good luck!
 

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If you can figure out how they got into your yard, I think that's as important of an issue as whether to reimburse for the chickens. If the chickens came over the fence there's really not much you can do about it. If it is your fence and the chickens found a hole, you should repair it and I personally would reimburse them for the chickens in that case. If it's the neighbor's fence and the chickens found a hole, then they need to repair it or they're going to keep losing chickens.

I wouldn't be worried about the dogs. 2 out of my 3 would do the exact same thing, I'm sure.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the responses. At first I was appalled my dogs would do this. I was wondering if I made a misstep on raising them. It was early in the morning. And usually I put them outside for a couple hours before it gets hot so they can run and go to the bathroom and rough house some. I was wondering if maybe I should have trained them not to eat something, but then how would I do something like that. Anyway, I was more worried that my dogs would now be aggressive towards my 7 month old because of the 'myth'. I took great time in making sure they lived well together. Slowly integrating the newborn into the their environment and vice versa. For almost 8 months before the baby was born I trained them not to go into her room. So I was afraid they would ignore all the teachings and training looking for their next meal.

Of course one of them is a beagle and was bred to hunt so that shouldn't surprise me.
 

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Chickens are dinner. Almost any dog would kill a chicken, especially one that came into his yard.

As for reimbursing the neighbor. . .what everyone else said. Your dogs DID get dinner out of it, so maybe pay them something just to keep the peace. But if the birds were on your property, I don't think you're legally obligated to pay.
 

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We had this exact issue when I was growing up. My neighbors free roaming chickens would wander into our yard, and Lola would kill them. We never repaid the guy, because he realized it was a risk with not penning them up.

I would talk to your neighbor, though, just so he knows what happened to his birds. He might start keeping them fenced. Don't offer to pay foe them though, unless he brings it up. Its not like your dogs went onto his property and killed them.

The idea that a dog tasting blood and become vicious is ridiculous. Dogs are descendant from carnivorous, so of course they can eat meat. Lol
 

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I'm pretty sure ANY dog would at least try to "play" with them, even if they didn't mean to kill them. Dogs are dogs, I don't think you need to worry about aggression at all. Minimal prey drive is so engrained in any dog... I just brought home two fire bellied toads and my aussie/jrt/mutt has been watching their every move through the aquarium glass for about 18 hours :doh:
 

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Should I worry now that the dogs are going to be aggressive? Someone said something about them getting the taste of blood.
Yep, like others said, this is just a myth. most dogs would go after a chicken if they could, and would most likely kill it and eat it. Tasty tasty.
But I would say that after this they may look at chickens a bit more intently.


Also should I reimburse the neighbors? Their chickens came into my fenced in yard.
I don't know where you live, but where I am, people will outright shoot and kill their own family dog for killing a chicken.
Not to scare you but it may be best to do what's possible to keep the peace between your neighbor and you. I don't know how intently s/he loves hir chickens. Lol.
Howeverrrr they were in your yard, inside your fence, so it's really hir bad for not keep hir chickens home.
 

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And when I say chickens, I mean live walking and eating beings. The dogs were in the back yard minding their own business when the chickens got into the yard. Not sure how, maybe squeezed through an openings and before I knew what was going on, my dogs had killed and started eating one and had another cornered and dying.

Should I worry now that the dogs are going to be aggressive? Someone said something about them getting the taste of blood. Also should I reimburse the neighbors? Their chickens came into my fenced in yard.
eating chickens doesn't have anything to do with being human (or dog) aggressive. My dogs have killed many wild bunnies, but people are quite safe around them. Even though the chickens were in your yard, I think the friendly thing to do would be to reimburse the neighbor this time, and maybe see if he's willing to work on getting a better containment system.
 

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Kabota is the gentlest dog I've ever seen with children- and has killed voles, birds and rabbits.

Personally, if I had the cash and this is the first time the chickens have gotten in, I'd help replace them, but in the spirit of neighborly good will, not because you owe the owner. You don't.
 

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i would be pissed, LOL. one thing i absolute;y LOVE besides dogs is chickens, love them like i do my dogs, gave them names & eeverything, lol. then one of my former bosses dogs killed one of them & i was PISSED.
 

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Thanks for the responses. At first I was appalled my dogs would do this. I was wondering if I made a misstep on raising them. It was early in the morning. And usually I put them outside for a couple hours before it gets hot so they can run and go to the bathroom and rough house some. I was wondering if maybe I should have trained them not to eat something, but then how would I do something like that. Anyway, I was more worried that my dogs would now be aggressive towards my 7 month old because of the 'myth'. I took great time in making sure they lived well together. Slowly integrating the newborn into the their environment and vice versa. For almost 8 months before the baby was born I trained them not to go into her room. So I was afraid they would ignore all the teachings and training looking for their next meal.

Of course one of them is a beagle and was bred to hunt so that shouldn't surprise me.
Prey drive will NOT transfer to human aggression, what your dogs did was natural for them to do. I have a Doberman that has killed several (wild) birds and would most definately kill a chicken, she is in NO way aggressive toward family members. She has OTHER issues that give her the potential for aggression toward strangers (mostly fear and anxiety based) but it's NOT due to her prey drive.
 

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I would just show up at the neighbors house with some cute baby chics and let the neighbor know that their chickens had wondered onto your property and that they might want to fix their fence so it doesn't happen again.
 

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We had this exact issue when I was growing up. My neighbors free roaming chickens would wander into our yard, and Lola would kill them. We never repaid the guy, because he realized it was a risk with not penning them up.

I would talk to your neighbor, though, just so he knows what happened to his birds. He might start keeping them fenced. Don't offer to pay foe them though, unless he brings it up. Its not like your dogs went onto his property and killed them.

The idea that a dog tasting blood and become vicious is ridiculous. Dogs are descendant from carnivorous, so of course they can eat meat. Lol
I totally agree with you. My aunt and uncle have chickens that they keep in a fully enclosed pen to protect them from foxes, coyotes and their own dogs. If your neighbor's chickens are running free, that's a risk they're taking. For all they know their chickens got eaten by a fox. IMO I don't think you really owe your neighbors for the chickens since they came into your yard. If you want to do the right thing, I'd just let them know they got into your yard and you're not sure how, but it might behoove them to inspect the fence.

The whole "dog turning aggressive from the taste of blood" thing is totally false. Either of my dogs would kill and eat a chicken if given the opportunity and I would never worry about any transferred aggression.
 

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I agree with most said here.

One thing I want to point out. Killing other animals has nothing to do with human aggression as stated. However, prey drive can carry over to small children, toddlers, and squeaky running kids. Probably not likely with a beagle, just be aware if your dogs are high prey.

Greta is the best dog with little kids. She adores them. However, she has unbelievable drive, and you can totally see her expression change if a small noisy kid darts by. The rest of mine are ok with kids, but never allowed to be around children in that situation.

Normal dogs are probably fine, just a word of caution, if you have high prey driven dogs.

Also, I would reimburse the chicken owner just to stay on good terms. Dogs around here are shot or poisoned for killing chickens or stock. Even though you aren't at fault at all, the whole good fences make good neighbours thing rings true.
 

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I can understand (sorta) the whole dogs getting shot or poisoned for killing stock or chickens ... IF they came onto the stock/chicken owner's property and did so. However, if you are lax in penning your animals, then a lot of the responsibility for their death is on your head...just as it would be if they had gotten hit by a car instead.
 

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I can understand (sorta) the whole dogs getting shot or poisoned for killing stock or chickens ... IF they came onto the stock/chicken owner's property and did so. However, if you are lax in penning your animals, then a lot of the responsibility for their death is on your head...just as it would be if they had gotten hit by a car instead.
That is probably usually the case. Not many here keep their dogs confined. I just know how ridiculous people can be.
 
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