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Hi guys!.....for about a week now, my dog never wants to come in from the yard --- I have to chase him around and pull him in by the collar or my son has to get him and carry him in. When he comes back in, he lays by the back door until someone lets him out.

Not sure why....nothing has changed.....but it is very annoying....

Any hints?:rolleyes:
 

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Hi guys!.....for about a week now, my dog never wants to come in from the yard --- I have to chase him around and pull him in by the collar or my son has to get him and carry him in. When he comes back in, he lays by the back door until someone lets him out.

Not sure why....nothing has changed.....but it is very annoying....

Any hints?:rolleyes:
Heh... my dog asks to be let out and wants back in soon as she realizes I'm not going out with her.

I don't really have much suggestions aside from stuff you've already tried. I could say chasing her probably doesn't help cause she probably finds that a good game to play so it reinforces her to run from you guys.

Maybe teach her a good recall word? Take her out in the back yard with a training lead (since you can't trust her to come to you yet), pick a word to use (something you won't use all the time, I use cookie for my dog), have a really special treat your dog loves (and make sure she only gets it when she comes to that word), call it once, and then do what you can to encourage her to come to you, if all else fails you have the lead (but try to make it her idea rather than forcing her). When she does come to you praise her and give her her special treat. Keep practicing this until she's pretty good at coming to you when she hears that word without having to resort to the training lead. Practice iwth it off.

Now try it from your back door *grin* (maybe keep the training lead on her for this). Repeat until she gets reliable here. If she gets reliable enough, start doing it without the lead. Don't take her in the first time she comes for the word. In fact, you may want to do this a few times while she is in the yard before you want her in so she doesn't learn the word means she's coming inside but that the word means she's getting her special treat. And I wouldn't start only using it for when she comes inside (they will learn and you want her not to associate it with coming inside).

Anyways, that's my suggestion. Some one else mght have something better.
 

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You're not going to like this.....he's telling you something as loud as he can.....he doesn't want to be in the house. He resists all attempts to be caught and made a prisoner again. If the 'chase' is the only mental or physical exercise he gets during the day then you have an explanation.....otherwise, there is a relationship breakdown if he no longer wants to be with you.
 

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You're not going to like this.....he's telling you something as loud as he can.....he doesn't want to be in the house. He resists all attempts to be caught and made a prisoner again. If the 'chase' is the only mental or physical exercise he gets during the day then you have an explanation.....otherwise, there is a relationship breakdown if he no longer wants to be with you.
Needing exercise and wanting to play, probably. However, I believe it's a little ridiculous of you to say there is a "relationship breakdown" going on. (I'm assuming the dog is a husky based in the sig pic) 1, Huskies are very independent dogs. Being a velcro dog and following you around isn't usually in the job description. This has nothing to do with the owner's relationship with the dog. It's not that the dog has lost interest in the owner and that their relationship is compromised, that's just how most huskies are. I seriously doubt that the owner has done something wrong to get on their dog's "bad side." Dog ownership simply doesn't work like that. 2, Regardless of how much exercise the dog gets, huskies' endurance is so extremely high, I wouldn't be surprised if he STILL wanted to play in the backyard after tons of exercise. My boyfriend's sister has an aussie that I used to take care of, and after several hours of jogging through the park and playing frisbee, she was still ready to go toss around a few tennis balls in the backyard, and aussies are nothing compared to a husky. She, however, was extremely attached to me, and had a very DEpendent personality, unlike a husky.

I honestly feel you are making WAY too many assumptions, and personifying dogs in a way that is utterly untrue. This is not a boyfriend/girlfriend relationship, where one partner has lost interest and wants to move out.

To the OP: More exercise will probably help, since it seems that he wants to play. I don't think it has anything to do with him wanting to be OUT of the house, or him wanting to be away from you, it just seems like he's very eager to play and burn off some energy. If I were you, I'd make indoors a "playful place," too. Right now, he probably sees being outdoors as being fun-time, and being indoors as being just plain boring. Maybe after getting him revved up outside, you can take the play indoors, too, by bouncing a ball down a hallway or twirling around a flirt pole in the living room. I'd also work on his recall like Tigress suggested. This way, when you want to go in, playtime isn't always over, and he has a chance of getting a treat. Now he sees going inside as a huge bummer, but you can change that... Make going inside an opportunity for more fun!

Also, the chasing him around and dragging him by the collar is not a very good thing to do. The chasing him makes him feel as if you're playing a game with him, so that he doesn't listen. And dragging him in by the collar is associating negativity while going in. I think the best short term fix to getting him to go in (The above paragraph is the long-term one) is run around and play with him in the yard, and get him to chase YOU. Then, all of the sudden and with no warning, run inside and leave the door open. Don't call him, because you call him to get him to go inside, not during play. The idea is to make him feel like you're STILL playing, so that it's his idea of going inside. He'll either follow you in because he's chasing you, or wonder where the heck you went and decides to go investigate. He may not even come in at all, just leave the door open and let him come in when he's ready.
 

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Can you get him to chase you? Try going out into the yard, turn around, and sprint towards the door while clapping your hands.
 

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Weren't you the one worrying about your Husky being too hot in the warm weather? LOL :p

Ok, but seriously. Have there been any changes in the house? Has ANYTHING created a fearful response from him? (Loud noise, moving things, smoke alarm, etc). That's the first thing I think of because I know during certain situations my dog prefers to be outside (namely when the smoke alarm goes off because someone burnt a bagel or something) so I'm wondering if this might be an extreme example of the same thing.

Does he want to walk? Where is he being fed? Will he come back in to eat?

How much exercise is he getting? Maybe he needs a good ol' tuckerin' out..
 

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However, I believe it's a little ridiculous of you to say there is a "relationship breakdown" going on. .
Not really.....any dog that has to be dragged by the collar and physically carried around is not having a good relationship with their owners...Husky or not.
 

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How old is the dog? Nargle is right about Huskies. They are very independent and are known for the difficulty to get a good recall, especially during their teenage years. If your dog is 10-20 months old, that's probably what you're dealing with.

How much exercise does he get? If he's not getting copious amounts of exercise, it's likely he just needs more. And I don't mean running around in the yard by himself. He needs you (or someone) to really make sure he gets in some good running and playing every single day or the situation is just going to get worse.

He also needs some real work on recall. I would try Whistle Training. And running after your dog, dragging him in by the collar and carrying him in is the really wrong way to deal with this. You're saying, "I have no other way to make you live by the rules than physically forcing you. So I'll resort to that." Find a way to make coming in fun.

You've got a highly intelligent, independent, very, VERY active dog on your hands. You need to meet his needs.
 

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¿Is there a particular reason you don't want him outside? My sled dogs go through a similar mood shift in the spring/summer. Once the weather breaks into the upper 70's and 80's (F), they sometimes spend up to 72 hours outside. I never worried about it. After a while they remember that the house has A/C, and then there's the problem of getting them OUTSIDE. It's shutdown season for my sled heads.
 
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