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Discussion Starter #21
I'm surprised that is what you would say. It is impossible to remember everytime you make something to remember that your dog will jump. I can set up the table, and then go into the closet to get some napkins and when I come back I see my dog jumping on the table. Not to mention even sometimes when we're eating dinner and talking, my dog will just jump up looking for food. It is impossible to avoid the situation
 

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Crate the dog then while you are cooking or eating or confine it to another room.

Truly, it's not rocket science. I sense you're looking for quick and easy solutions. You have two.
 

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I remember every day that I live with opportunistic vultures. Between the dogs and cats, anything left out is liable to be at least nibbled on or licked.

It's just been the past few weeks that my dogs (ages 8 and 6) have been left out while we are eating dinner, and half the time, they still run to their crates when we start pulling out plates and utensils.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Putting my dog in the crate is what we have been doing so far. The problem is when people come over and we're having dinner, she whines a lot. She starts barking and really going crazy. I was wondering if there was any training method to get her to ignore the food or something like that.
 

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Does your dog know a 'go to place/mat', or other 'station' type cue? If not, that's were I'd suggest you start.

Train, and heavily reinforce your dog lying on her bed/mat/etc... especially when you are preparing food, working in the area of food, serving/eating or otherwise interacting with ...... FOOD!

Train this in the absence of guests & work on her impulse control in & around the kitchen area. Reward heavily for her remaining outside the 'human food zone'. When you can't (or don't want to) be actively working with her on this behavior then simply gate or crate her out of the kitchen/dining areas.

If she fusses? Ignore. Simply ignore.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
my dog know the command crate and know that means go to the crate. We generally use the crate though when we go out, so she associates it with we're going to be away for a couple of hours. My does also have a mat, and I think that would be a better one to her to because she likes to watch everybody. She just sits down and watches everyone walk by. My family have gone on road trips before, and we can generally get her to lie under the table and not walk around the hotel by the third or fourth time. It's just as soon as we step out of the room or aren't paying attention
 

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My one dog is trained to lay on his bed during human cooking/mealtimes. Like this:
He knows he only gets food/treats if he's on his bed, so he doesn't approach the table or counters anymore.

I am working on also training my puppy to do this, but he just doesn't have the level of chill necessary yet to lay in one place that long when not asleep. So for now we crate during meals because if he's not mature enough to learn good habits yet, I at least don't want to let him develop bad habits.
 

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I use e collars a LOT in training. You are using the collar inappropriately. You need to train the dog FIRST. I did not start to use the e collar on my dog until the dog was TWO. This, after training a LOT (every day.. something) and even then it is used sparingly and specifically.

If you are using an e collar to prevent counter surfing and to make the dog come to you, then you are using it wrong. Totally. Wrong. That is not what it is for. If you are using it to enforce a recall, and the minute you put the e collar on the dog shuts down, you have used if VERY wrong (and there is no guarantee the dog will come because the dog has not been trained).

Using an e collar in the manner you have been is like hitting a very young Toddler for not using a spoon to eat without showing him how to use the spoon first.

The device itself is not cruel. The way you are using it most certainly is.

In fact, both my dogs who do get e collars put on actually get EXCITED when they see me get the e collars out. It means we are going to DO something (they think training is fun and play). Neither dog wore an e collar until the dog was 2 years old (or pretty close to it). This was with extensive daily training without the e collar.

A dog that will "run away" needs to be on leash. The owner of a dog that would run away needs to examine their relationship with the dog and figure out why the dog is running away. Most dogs who do not have a good recall have not been given a good reason TO recall. If they do (finally) come when called the owner may be angry and hit the dog (why come back if you are going to get hit?). Even more often the dog comes and the owner does nothing or just says "good dog.." Sorry.. that just isn't enough in the dog's mind.

You need to make coming to you the best thing ever NO MATTER WHAT has just happened. Food (and not dry kibble or dog treats but something good like Hot dogs!) and play and CELEBRATING recalls is the way to get it. Being punitive with an e collar without making recalls the best the ever for the dog will likely get the dog to run further from you and not come back.

Put the e collar away. You are doing it wrong. You are being unfair to the dog. The only thing you are making clear to the dog is you cannot be trusted.
 

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Never leave anything on the table that the dog can eat. Ever. When cooking and/or eating have the dog lay down on a bed or crate the dog. NEVER feed the dog from the table or counter.

I was thinking about this the other night. Both dogs were laying there on the floor and I was eating a steak I had just charbroiled. Neither dog even LOOKED at me. In fact, the cats did not either. And I realized it was because I never gave them anything while I was cooking or eating. They did not expect it and so did not even look at me. I never told them a thing. When I am cooking if a dog comes in the kitchen I give the dog a job (to lie down). When I am not in the kitchen there is NOTHING on the counter to eat. Ever.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
To respond to the @3GSD4IPO my dog is two. I was bringing her to the dog park, with treats as she had been coming back other times. Then when it was time to go, unlike other times, she looked at me as I told her to come, and then ran off the other way. She knows how to come, and she does it all the time, I just got the e collar as a safety precaution whilst I was practicing recalls. The next time I was at the park she had her e collar on and she was doing great with recalls. Then she started to run off to another dog. I told her to come, she looked at me, and again she didn't. Then I gave her a beep and she did come back, but she didn't feel like playing, and was kind of just moping around. I didn't know why, and then the next time I tried to use the e collar for training, she was moping around as well. I thought she wasn't used to it, so tried to leave it on her for a short bit of time. That's when I noticed she wasn't jumping on the table. I also showed her how it doesn't do much, but she was scared of it so I came to this forum. I don't try to be cruel. Now I have turned to the long lines. Also, you are very lucky to have animals that won't jump on the table. I don't. She jumps on the table to get the compost, paper towels, toys that are on there, even pencils. Anything that looks interesting, she will take it. You might say it is easy to just not leave anything on the tables, but it isn't. It isn't even the tables. The counter, any chairs, anything that has anything on it she will take. Now I am practicing leave its with her and just moving the food to the counter and stepping away.
 

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George came from a place where they did zero training he was 18 months .. Hes a beagle not known for their wonderful obiedience but within a short space of time he has learned that mealtimes were only at mealtimes and not every time we walked into the kitchen. He learned that our didning table would get him nothing so he has totally stopped begging.

Taking stuff is still sometimes a problem but we use a leave it and we reward good behaviour. George has learned that if it isnt his he must leave it alone.
An ecollar never came into this just repeating ourselves until we were blue in the face and he got the message. It takes time but any dog can learn if you are willing to put the work
 

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I am not lucky.. I simply keep an eye on the dog and give him a Job in the house or crate him if I am not watching him. I keep things off the table and counter. That is all.

The other day I was busy with something. I was suddenly "where is my dog?" Not the older dog.. but the young dog I am training in sport. I looked around and then went to the screened porch. He was standing on the table watching the neighbors (a quarter mile away). He could see better up high. I did not scold him. I just called him and he hopped down. I don't put anything off limits except the cats. Dogs must not chew on cats... and he gets that. No other "rules." I just give him a job (go to mat, lie down, etc.) or I crate/kennel him.

I would NEVER use an e collar when my dog was interacting with other dogs. I would NEVER take my dog to a dog park. I hate dog parks.. a lot of dogs hate them too.

Recall with an e collar for training is always one on one in a large enclosed area. When the dog gets to you IF you have stimmed him you have to make a party that is bigger and better and greater than the stim. It really requires a lot of training first both of dog and handler.
 

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I’m so glad you decided to ditch the e-collar. It’s common for dogs to not listen in unfamiliar places. I would just keep the long lead on at all times outside. You might be able to train a better recall given some time and training. The key will be practicing with her at the cottage. Take small steps and reward her highly for coming from close distances at first. Then run further away. Slowly adding in distractions (people, other animals, etc..)
 

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Have you tried putting him in the crate when your are eating and giving him a stuffed Kong or something to chew on?
 
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