Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,443 Posts
Is this at doggie daycare? What do other people think of the growls?

What breed of dog is your dog? What breeds (or sizes/types) of dogs are growling at her?

They could be growling aggressively, or they could be noisy growly playing dogs. Some dogs, and some breeds, are just very vocal when they play. I've had the dogs out playing in my yard, closely supervised, and when you look at them it is obvious they are playing happily and without aggression but if you couldn't see them and could only hear them, it would sound like they were tearing each other apart. A lot of it is in body language, they take turns chasing, they take turns rolling the other dog over and tackling, they take turns play biting, if one yelps, the other backs off immediately etc.

If the other dogs are actually being aggressive in their growls and nips (yelping is like "stop that" but if there isn't any blood and the nipper backs off, the other dog probably didn't mean to hurt), then its likely either your dog has too forward and pushy of play style or the other dog has a low tolerance for play. Since it is different dogs doing this, I'd guess the problem lies with your dog's play style or body language. Some dogs just seem to be able to annoy other dogs without even trying. Boxers are a breed like that, their facial shape and play style both are at odds with "typical" dog manners.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,443 Posts
Personally, I don't let my dog meet unknown dogs in situations like you described happening on the trail. If she does well at daycare, she's getting lots of good play and dog interaction there, she doesn't need to play with dogs that you don't know in a situation that you can't control.

Work with her to have a very strong recall and "Quit It" command- as in, stop playing, leave the other dog alone and continue walking (or whatever you then want her to do).

I wouldn't want my dog to "learn the hard way" because if she annoys the wrong dog, she could be seriously hurt. If you know the dog she's playing with and know that dog will give proper, controlled corrections then it can be okay to let the dog correct her pushy play style. But never with a strange dog or a dog that doesn't have the manners and control to correct without physical harm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,443 Posts
The most fool-proof is not to let her off leash.

The second most fool-proof is to train religiously until you have 99.9% instant response to stop in her tracks. Don't let her off leash until you have that compliance. Working on training a very strong "leave it" and then a "look at me" to get her focused on you. Use a long line as an intermediate step so that you aren't actually holding her right by you but are requiring her to listen to your commands while you retain the ability to enforce the command (reel her in/shorten the line).
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top