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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 15 year old Mix breed female (intact) with a tumor on the mammary gland.
Took her to the vet .
Xrays show 2 spots on the lungs.

The vet said surgery to remove the mammary gland tumor would only be a cosmetic fix.
Removal of the mammary tumor would cost about $1000.

So.. I sit here looking at my dog with a tumor on its belly...
Shes playfull and happy ..I really dont know what to do.
 

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I have a 15 year old Mix breed female (intact) with a tumor on the mammary gland.
Took her to the vet .
Xrays show 2 spots on the lungs.

The vet said surgery to remove the mammary gland tumor would only be a cosmetic fix.
Removal of the mammary tumor would cost about $1000.

So.. I sit here looking at my dog with a tumor on its belly...
Shes playfull and happy ..I really dont know what to do.
Im so sorry to hear such terrible news :(
A few things to keep in mind...
-Shes an older dog, being put under anesthesia could be risky, she may not wake up from it.
-Cancer in dogs generally isnt 'curable' but can be treated to make the dogs life easier.
-Some dogs can live for years depending on the type of cancer without treatment.

As your vet for other options. Such as, if she is in pain (im not saying she is :) ) is there a med you can give her to ease it?
 

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I am so sorry to hear this. That is a tough thing to face .............
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Im so sorry to hear such terrible news :(
A few things to keep in mind...
-Shes an older dog, being put under anesthesia could be risky, she may not wake up from it.
-Cancer in dogs generally isnt 'curable' but can be treated to make the dogs life easier.
-Some dogs can live for years depending on the type of cancer without treatment.

As your vet for other options. Such as, if she is in pain (im not saying she is :) ) is there a med you can give her to ease it?
Shes not in pain ..Shes actually behaving perfectly normal and happy.
The tumor on her belly is about half the size of a golf ball ...

The vet also mentioned what you said about anesthesia with an older dog..

I really would just like to have the tumor removed and hope for the best.
 

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As someone who went through this with my Pyrenees - I'm sorry :(.

My Pyrenees was diagnosed with mammary cancer at 8-9 years old. Both the vet and my family felt that the risk of putting her under to have the tumor biopsied/removed and spayed wasn't worth it at her age and at the time her quality of life was super - she never even noticed the tumor or acted like it bothered her.

The May of her 11th year she was having problems getting up and moving around climbing steps we moved my mattress and bed to the living room her so we could still sleep together. She developed a problem with what would be her wrist (it was very swollen) and it was making it very hard for her to get around. The tumor was actually taking blood away from the rest of her body and at the same time it was essentially dying and poisoning her. Once her quality of life could no longer be sustained we had to make the choice to let her cross over the bridge because she just kept fighting to stay with me.


As you can see her tumor was fairly large - probably bigger than my closed fist, but she never showed any signs that it was there or bothered her. This picture was her last winter with snow - 2009.

At 15 surgery isn't really an option (at least to me) and any vet will probably tell you that as she's lived a good, long life and it would be pretty risky to put her under anesthesia for surgery. But talk it over with your vet and see what he/she says.
 

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I'm very sorry. I recommend Not removing the tumor, b/c the Vet said it wouldn't help. However, if you find a reputable Vet who tells you that a different procedure Would help, I suggest talking with the original Vet, and then considering it.

I agree with Niraya that surgery is risky, and if successful may reduce the quality of life. The spots on the lungs are the key issue. I don't know how chemo/radio therapies work on canine lungs.

I vote for keeping the dog comfortable and enjoy her current quality of life, rather than over-extending...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
As someone who went through this with my Pyrenees - I'm sorry :(.

My Pyrenees was diagnosed with mammary cancer at 8-9 years old. Both the vet and my family felt that the risk of putting her under to have the tumor biopsied/removed and spayed wasn't worth it at her age and at the time her quality of life was super - she never even noticed the tumor or acted like it bothered her.

The May of her 11th year she was having problems getting up and moving around climbing steps we moved my mattress and bed to the living room her so we could still sleep together. She developed a problem with what would be her wrist (it was very swollen) and it was making it very hard for her to get around. The tumor was actually taking blood away from the rest of her body and at the same time it was essentially dying and poisoning her. Once her quality of life could no longer be sustained we had to make the choice to let her cross over the bridge because she just kept fighting to stay with me.


As you can see her tumor was fairly large - probably bigger than my closed fist, but she never showed any signs that it was there or bothered her. This picture was her last winter with snow - 2009.

At 15 surgery isn't really an option (at least to me) and any vet will probably tell you that as she's lived a good, long life and it would be pretty risky to put her under anesthesia for surgery. But talk it over with your vet and see what he/she says.
I Honestly have to Thank You for your reply...
 

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I Honestly have to Thank You for your reply...
You're very welcome. Reading back over it - some parts don't make sense as I forgot words, I guess. Two years later I still cry talking about it and was crying while writing the post so it's not too coherent.

In any event, I'm sorry for what you're going through. It's not at all easy but I know that you'll make the right choices for your dog.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
You're very welcome. Reading back over it - some parts don't make sense as I forgot words, I guess. Two years later I still cry talking about it and was crying while writing the post so it's not too coherent.

In any event, I'm sorry for what you're going through. It's not at all easy but I know that you'll make the right choices for your dog.
I read what you said in your reply several times...
Im really having a hard time dealing with my dogs problem right now and I feel kinda lost. ...
It aint easy...Thanx again.
 

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No, it's not easy. I am so sorry.

Personally, I wouldn't remove the tumor. In and of itself, it's probably not bothering her. Heck, people have walked around with 50lb tumors in their stomachs not noticing a thing other than some heartburn or constipation, and people are wussies compared to dogs.

Honestly, you will know when it's time. There will come a day when you will see that your beloved friend isn't happy anymore, that she's just struggling to continue. That, to me, is the point at which the only kindness is euthanasia.

Please feel free to soak up all the sympathy you need here. Most people here completely understand.
 

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I for one completely understand .... I saw the light go from my dogs eyes and he was struggling through the pain just to try and stay with me ... it is a terribly tough decision ... but you will know when ....

Feel free to talk all you need .... it helps ...
 

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I'm really sorry for such a suck diagnosis. With that tumor and her age, I personally would opt to not have surgery. There's no right answer but we're all here for you and we'll support your decision, whatever it is.
 

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my friend had an older mixed breed dog who developed mammary cancer around 9 years old and lived another 4 years without treatment and only showed signs of slowing down in her last 2 months of life, he tumor was about double the size of the photo Niraya posted by the end. If it makes you feel any better, at 15 and with the tumor being the size it is I think old age may let her pass peacefully in time long before the tumor could take it's toll.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks guys for your input.
I think Im gonna take your advice and leave it alone. Thats pretty much what the vet suggested to do.
 

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Sorry to hear of this.
My dog also has cancer and is doing well for almost two years since his diagnosis/surgery.
Now he is too old to do much more than give him a new cancer inhibitor that has recently come on the market.
Sorry--but it is not for cancer's such as your dog has.

15 years old is nearly immortal for a dog.
I have seen people go hog-wild in treatment for dogs in advanced ages.
And honestly this is crazy, and a waste of money.

If your dog was 5 or 6 or even perhaps as young as ten, then I would say to have some advanced proceedures performed.
But in your case, I think your dog is way too old.
So old in fact that he/she will probably wake up one morning in dog-heaven from old age, rather than from the cancer... if you know what I mean.

If you really wanted to do something--then try chemo.
It does not affect dogs the way it ravages people.

Or try this stuff: Essiac

http://essiacinfo.org/

Research this stuff.
I believe it has efficacy and this is the reason it was shut down decades ago.
But you'll have to brew it up yourself or order it from some outfit that produces it as a supplement.

I believe it changes the blood/body chemistry and works much in the way that these new inhibitor drugs work--but for much, much less.
I am going to give it a whirl with my pooch also--he has mast cell tumors.

There is also this stuff: Neoplasene

The trick is to find a vet who is willing to use it, or knows how to use it.
This is tough.
It is a botanical agent derived from blood root.

It comes in a oral version that may prove useful to you.

http://holvet.net/neoplasene.html

http://www.buckmountainbotanicals.net/treatments/neoplasene.html

This stuff is not expensive to use.
You have to purchase 200 hondos worth at a time--and this last 4 months (depending upon the size of your hound).
So it works out to around 50 hondos per month to use (add the blood work costs).

Do your research on this stuff and let me know how it is going.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Its a week later and this tumor has doubled in size...
Loni is acting like nothings wrong...but Im very concerned.The tumor looks like its about to explode.
 

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sounds like it might have a fluid build up in it, have never heard of a tumor that grew that fast. I would get back to the vet
 
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