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I have a pembroke welsh corgi that is almost 3 years old. I recently discovered a lump on her back near her neck. It's about 1 1/2 inch wide and it's really hard. i noticed she is losing fur there and the color of the lump is really dark, like purple. can somebody please tell me what this might be? Her behavior is normal and she doesn't seem to be in pain when i touch it but only when i squeeze it lightly. Is this a symptom of a serious health issue? please help

I discovered this lump yesterday so I have no idea how long she's had it.
 

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I know this is scary, but it may very well be benign. Don't worry, take her to your vet to find out what it is for sure. Maddy had a similar lump, and it was a Sebaceous Cyst. I had it removed, and she's fine, never has returned.



From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A sebaceous cyst (a form of trichilemmal cyst) is a closed sac or cyst below the surface of the skin that has a lining that resembles the uppermost part (infundibulum) of a hair follicle and fills with a fatty white, semi-solid material called sebum. Sebum is produced by sebaceous glands of the epidermis.

It is sometimes (but not always) considered to be equivalent to epidermoid cyst, or similar enough to be addressed as a single entity.[1]

Some sources state that a "sebaceous cyst" is defined not by the contents of the cyst (sebum) but by the origin (sebaceous glands). Because an "epidermoid cyst" originates in the epidermis, and a "pilar cyst" originates from hair follicles, neither type of cyst would be considered a sebaceous cyst by this definition.[2] However, in practice, the terms are often used interchangeably.

"True" sebaceous cysts are relatively rare.[3]


The scalp, ears, back, face, and upper arm, are common sites for sebaceous cysts, though they may occur anywhere on the body except the palms of the hands and soles of the feet. In males a common place for them to develop is the scrotum and chest .They are more common in hairier areas, where in cases of long duration they could result in hair loss on the skin surface immediately above the cyst. They are smooth to the touch, vary in size, and are generally round in shape.

They are generally mobile masses that can consist of:

fibrous tissues and fluids
a fatty, (keratinous), substance that resembles cottage cheese, in which case the cyst may be called "keratin cyst"
a somewhat viscous, serosanguineous fluid (containing purulent and bloody material)
The nature of the contents of a sebaceous cyst, and of its surrounding capsule, will be determined by whether the cyst has ever been infected.

With surgery, a cyst can usually be excised in its entirety. Poor surgical technique or previous infection leading to scarring and tethering of the cyst to the surrounding tissue may lead to rupture during excision and removal. A completely removed cyst will not recur, though if the patient has a predisposition to cyst formation, further cysts may develop in the same general area.
 

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Looks like it's time for a trip to the vet, sooner then later. They are the only one's that will be able to tell you what the lump is. If it is something bad, it needs to be taken care of ASAP, so get your dog to the vet.
 

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Definitely get your dog to the vet. I wouldn't rush her into the emergency ward, but I would make an appointment as soon as you possibly can. It could be benign OR it could be much worse. Only a vet will be able to tell; not strangers over the internet.
 

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We are not vets so we can only guess. The Internet is not a substitute for professional medical care. Please seek the advice of a vet.
 
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