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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My dog had TLPO surgery yesterday, the surgery wasnt very long. It was a very short procedure, but hospital said my dog is not eating. They wanted to keep him overnight for observation.

There wasn't any update on since this morning. I hope the vet didn't overpose him. I am just so worried, I might get a call that I don't want to hear tomorrow. He was doing perfectly healthy, despite tearing his ccl.
 

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I've had TPLO surgery done on my own dog and rescue fosters, and they were never released from the hospital within 24 hours. It's a major surgery, and I have trouble believing anyone would describe it as "short". They cut the leg bone, have to do precise measuring and calculating as to the angle of the cut, put in a plate and screws to hold the bone back together till it heals, usually release (remove) the meniscus, clean up the non-functioning ccl if necessary, sew and staple things back together. Some dogs handle it well and can go home sooner than others. The vets want to be sure the dog is up and walking well enough to go home, even though the dog will need support. If the vet doesn't call you, call him.
 

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As storyist said, it's a pretty involved procedure, so maybe they meant that is was short compared to the average TPO surgery? Anyway, one of the side effects anesthesia can be nausea and inappetence.
 

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The first picture looks pretty typical of what I saw in mine. The redness will fade and swelling go down in a few days. Be sure you follow vet instructions as to confinement and supporting him when he goes for potty walks. There used to be an orthopedic dog forum that was really helpful for those going through these kind of surgeries with their dogs, but I think things like that have pretty much moved to Facebook. You could look and see what you can find.

From my experience, my advice would be: Don't get soft-hearted and remove whatever device the vet has put on to keep him from licking the incision. If he licks he can remove stitches or cause inflammation that leads in infection.

Be careful to restrict him as advised. You really, really don't want any accidents where he overdoes it on that leg, and he's probably soon going to want more exercise than he should have. Mine figured our very fast that as soon as they relieved themselves, they were going right back inside and started holding it as long as they could to extend potty walks.

Once he's all healed, follow rehab advice as best you can. I don't mean the professional rehab like water treadmill, which you do if you can afford it, but can do without if you can't. I mean how long the walks should be each week. I have Rotties, and for me the hardest part was restraining them when they weren't supposed to be cavorting.

Good luck. I hope it all goes smoothly for you and yours.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The first picture looks pretty typical of what I saw in mine. The redness will fade and swelling go down in a few days. Be sure you follow vet instructions as to confinement and supporting him when he goes for potty walks. There used to be an orthopedic dog forum that was really helpful for those going through these kind of surgeries with their dogs, but I think things like that have pretty much moved to Facebook. You could look and see what you can find.

From my experience, my advice would be: Don't get soft-hearted and remove whatever device the vet has put on to keep him from licking the incision. If he licks he can remove stitches or cause inflammation that leads in infection.

Be careful to restrict him as advised. You really, really don't want any accidents where he overdoes it on that leg, and he's probably soon going to want more exercise than he should have. Mine figured our very fast that as soon as they relieved themselves, they were going right back inside and started holding it as long as they could to extend potty walks.

Once he's all healed, follow rehab advice as best you can. I don't mean the professional rehab like water treadmill, which you do if you can afford it, but can do without if you can't. I mean how long the walks should be each week. I have Rotties, and for me the hardest part was restraining them when they weren't supposed to be cavorting.

Good luck. I hope it all goes smoothly for you and yours.
Thank you they never gave me bandage, only a leg clothe cover plus the medication.
 

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Some vets bandage it up and some don't. Sometimes I wondered if the ones who bandage do it so the owner can't see what's underneath and be upset.:) When I said don't be soft-hearted, I didn't mean that about a bandage over the surgery site, I meant some kind of device around the neck that keeps the dog from bending far enough to get at the incision. In my time it was the old heavy plastic lampshade, but I think donut-type things are more common these days. Maybe the cloth cover is enough to stop him for now? I didnt see anything like that in your pics. If they didn't give you anything, think about calling and asking. More dogs lick the site than don't, and you really don't want that.
 
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