Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My 3-year-old Malinois got her MR 1 OBJ (Mondioring 1 Obedience + Jump) certificate over the weekend :clap2:

Very proud of my little girl! We were at a new field, the temperature was higher than we had anticipated, but she still did everything to the best of her ability, I could not be happier :D

MR 1 OBJ consists of heeling, retrieve, absence (down stay with handler out of sight), food refusal, change of positions, send away, and one jump (choice of hurdle, palisade, or long jump).

Here is a video of her routine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
356 Posts
Congratulations ...again. Few people realize just how difficult and demanding this sport is. It takes a special dog, special person and training knowledge to work with these high drive dogs.

I hope you rewarded him with a nice dinner.

I likes your video. Nice to see your post here.

When we got or first Schutzhund title I took my dog to Mac's for a double burger and fries. He wouldn't eat it. So I had to go to an Outback steak house and get a sirloin and steak fries to go for him and I had the Mac's. LOL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Congratulations ...again. Few people realize just how difficult and demanding this sport is. It takes a special dog, special person and training knowledge to work with these high drive dogs.

I hope you rewarded him with a nice dinner.

I likes your video. Nice to see your post here.

When we got or first Schutzhund title I took my dog to Mac's for a double burger and fries. He wouldn't eat it. So I had to go to an Outback steak house and get a sirloin and steak fries to go for him and I had the Mac's. LOL
Thanks Byron! We took in a new foster dog a couple of days after our trial. We've been busy working with him, I didn't realize you had responded to this thread :)

As you can tell, I am not that active on dog forums.

LOL, your dog made me laugh. I shared chicken nuggets, French fries and an ice cream with my Mal on our way home.

Protection sports in general take a lot of time, a trainer friend says that protection sport is not just a sport, it a lifestyle. There is a lot of truth to it, at least for us. All of our spare time is devoted to training, LOL, fortunately, both of us enjoy it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
356 Posts
Nice to hear from you. You are right about lifestyle. Looking back I can't really believe I was able to devote the time and effort to the sport. I had two young boys still in diapers. I used to take them with me and often had to change them on the tailgate of the station wagon. Nothing like that to break your concentration. Surprisingly they both remember some of it. I often had them on harnesses and leashes attached to my belt while we tracked and did obedience work. It must have been quite a sight to see them following me while I worked dogs. They had to stay in the car for protection work however. I had an evaporative car cooler and a portable car shelter to keep direct sunlight off. The car actually stayed pretty cool considering how hot the days were. In the winter they played in the little snow we had. A person probably couldn't get away with this today. Neither of them have dogs today.

We are just starting a send out. I haven't tried it with this dog as I am more into streetwise. It's mostly for fun and a challenge to train something completely new with Samantha. She is catching on pretty well. We also are working on a down on recall.

We have been doing some Rally but my work schedule is interfering. I don't like the classes as there is too much stand around time and little training. We are going off on our own and when I think we can do a perfect score we'll go back for short tests in classes before trailing. Locally there are usually half a dozen perfect scores in each bracket so the winner is done be elapsed time. Sam is really fast and agile so we get around the courses pretty well.

I'll look forward to hearing more from you.

Byron
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,405 Posts
That is impressive; congratulations! I watched the video and appreciated the annotations explaining the different sections. I didn't know there was so much to it. Your dog looked so happy to be working, which was great to see!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Nice to hear from you. You are right about lifestyle. Looking back I can't really believe I was able to devote the time and effort to the sport. I had two young boys still in diapers. I used to take them with me and often had to change them on the tailgate of the station wagon. Nothing like that to break your concentration. Surprisingly they both remember some of it. I often had them on harnesses and leashes attached to my belt while we tracked and did obedience work. It must have been quite a sight to see them following me while I worked dogs. They had to stay in the car for protection work however. I had an evaporative car cooler and a portable car shelter to keep direct sunlight off. The car actually stayed pretty cool considering how hot the days were. In the winter they played in the little snow we had. A person probably couldn't get away with this today. Neither of them have dogs today.

We are just starting a send out. I haven't tried it with this dog as I am more into streetwise. It's mostly for fun and a challenge to train something completely new with Samantha. She is catching on pretty well. We also are working on a down on recall.

We have been doing some Rally but my work schedule is interfering. I don't like the classes as there is too much stand around time and little training. We are going off on our own and when I think we can do a perfect score we'll go back for short tests in classes before trailing. Locally there are usually half a dozen perfect scores in each bracket so the winner is done be elapsed time. Sam is really fast and agile so we get around the courses pretty well.

I'll look forward to hearing more from you.

Byron
Wow, talk about dedication! I can’t imagine taking care of two toddlers and training/tracking at the same time! Most of our club members either don’t have kids, or have older/grown up kids. It is really hard to manage a young family and do competitive dog training on the side as a hobby. We’ve seen a few who dropped out after several months because it was just too much work.

We are starting on search for little wood (she has to find a little wooden dowel that is place about 30 meters out, it will eventually become scent discrimination, where she has to find the one with my scent on it). We are also trying to decide between teaching her the palisade or long jump (in level 2, we have to pick 2 jumps, hurdle, palisade, or long jump). Our back yard is too tiny for training, hubby is trying to design a portable long jump so we can practice at a local park daily. Things we do for dog training, LOL.

We did puppy and beginner OB classes with her when she was younger. I agree, most of the time there was too much standing around and it was a lot of work to try to keep her drive up. Now that she is more mature, I think seminars work out better for us, there is more one-on-one time and we have more opportunity to address specific issues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
That is impressive; congratulations! I watched the video and appreciated the annotations explaining the different sections. I didn't know there was so much to it. Your dog looked so happy to be working, which was great to see!
Thank you! Mondioring is a very interesting sport, it seems like the more I get into it, the less I know, LOL.

Upright ears and wagging tail are very important to me, I try my best to make sure she is enjoying her training/interaction with me. She is not a typical Malinois (low drive as a puppy, breeder offered me an exchange but I couldn't do it), I think I spent the first 2 years of her life on drive-building. But I've learned a lot along the way and have thoroughly enjoyed this journey. I could not ask for a better teammate :)
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top