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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So my friend Angie and her Boston Terrier, Bartleby, went to the dog park to meet up with her guy friend who recently adopted a BT. They were trying to introduce them right and were talking about the new BT on leashes near their cars. The new BT seemed fine and sniffed at Bart and let Bart sniff him. He started to get hyper and was "mouth boxing" and they got him to calm down. He did try to go after Bartles again but this time he bit him in the face and bit up his leg up. He had to go get 4 stitches into his leg and has several other lacerations. Bartles was just standing there so this BT is reactive on something minor.

I wanted to know any advice, resources on dog aggression you think we should give to this guy. Need to get him to the right path of understanding that this is a huge issue if he tries to bring this BT around others and how to control the issue before it starts. It's a liability and not fair to any other dog and owner that does not know his issues and passes this dog and gets attacked.

Is this something he needs to go to a behaviorist for? I didn't think this is in the realm of a trainer.... How do you manage it alone as well?

I haven't really dealt with DA dogs much before, is there ever a chance of becoming non- DA?

Apparently it is his first dog too so I'm afraid he will just be like "eff this dog" if it causes further problems. The BTs history is that he was a stray in CA so you can only imagine that dog went through some things to get him the need to fend off others. Because it's his first dog, I don't think he is in tune with reading body language. I can see an issue with Gweeb before a snarl even comes out because I know him and his resource guarding, watch him and he isn't my first dog. Is there any good literature about canine verbal and non verbal communication?

Poor Bartleby. He's hobbling around and throwing up since he doesn't do well with anesthetics or pain medication. :-(

Thanks in advance community. :grouphug:
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Spotted Nikes- not possible.

The BTs history is that he was a stray in CA so you can only imagine that dog went through some things to get him the need to fend off others.
He was from a rescue and I assume the rescue gave all the information they can to his new owner of how he was in foster care. They should have at least. Don't know too much about the dog as I'm not friends with this guy. I'm only friends with Angie whose Bartleby got attacked.

I'm putting together some links for basic training too since it's the guys first dog so there's bound to be alot of stuff overlooked and probably a lot about dogs he doesn't quite understand yet.

He has had this BT for about a month or two.
 

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Since he is a first time dog owner, I'd put him in touch with a behaviorist.

If he doesn't want to learn how to navigate this, then the new boston needs to be kept away from other dogs.

this is a huge issue if he tries to bring this BT around others and how to control the issue before it starts.
The issue already has started.
Until the owner is working with a professional, he needs to steer clear of other dogs.

I obviously can't see what went down and you didn't see it either so I'm not going to say that yes, this dog can get to a point where it will not be DA(or calm in the presence of other dogs). The internet is a beautiful thing but it has its limitations.

(I'm about to make a breed generalization)
Bostons tend to be a whole lot of dog in a little package. All but one of the bostons I've worked with have ended up in the big dog play groups because they could not be trusted with dogs their own size or smaller.

Direct him toward On Talking Terms with Dogs: Calming Signals by Turid Rugaas. Also Ahimsa dog training on youtube(that's free!).
 

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I would suggest sending him to a behaviorist if he will go. It would be good to have a good set of eyes watch him introduced to other dogs and SEE why this reaction happened. We were just discussing last night dogs that go from 0 to 60 during play and end up way over stimulated which results in a seemingly unwarranted lash out. Jonas is one of these dogs. He has poor social skills and is unable to just end play when he's done playing instead of getting way too revved up. He would instigate play with Shambles, have a grand old time for a few minutes, then things would quickly go rough to him biting Sham.

ETA: Don't Bostons tend to be DA? I thought I remembered someone saying it was something to watch for in the breed.
 

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Especially when introducing new dogs, I remain calm but pay a lot of attention to their body language. If they displayed any tense or aggressive signals, in my opinion it's time to separate them and reintroduce them somewhere else. I'm also not a big fan of dog parks. There are too many uncontrolled dogs, and accidents can happen. It's also likely that the extra dogs can add excitement to an already volatile situation. I meet enough new people and dogs on walks at the regular park to take care of socialization, but even there I've watchful. Dog fights aren't a fun thing for any parties involved, and I've found the best way to break them up is to control the environment to prevent them from happening in the first place.
 

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Ahh. Poor Bartleby.
So, the two owners were standing talking (ie not closely watching the dogs) while the dogs were likely TOO close to each other one leash. They did some "mouth boxing"..what does it mean that they "got him to calm down?". It's very likely the initial mouth boxing was inhibited warnings...and that since he wasn't given appropriate space (not B's fault as he was on leash also) that he felt the need to escalate.
DISTANCE is key, especially after a build up of tension.

Talking to a behaviour consultant is a good idea, getting the dog properly assessed. I second the recommendation of Ahimsa dogtraining vids on youtube. The BAT protocol is very good for reactivity and aggression. Without seeing the incident and knowing exactly what preceded it, I'm hesitant to immediately say the dog is inherently DA as the description of the incident makes it sound like the dogs were together without issue for at least a few minutes before the actual bite happened. An on site assessment is key.
 
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