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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My job requires me to move from the east coast to the west coast for a promotion and to help the company. Now the problem is that I have a soon to be six month old Border Collie. It would kill me to leave him behind as I move away for what will likely be over a year so I'm looking for ways to keep him close without making him miserable. I will be working full-time and making good money so I'm not concerned with not having a large enough house. The big issue is leaving him alone for hours at a time. Would he be happy if I got another dog to act as a companion. If so what is a good sturdy lower maintenance breed for him? Male or female? Does anyone have any experience with this?

My Harvey is unusual when it comes to the breed standards. He is not the hyperactive boy I was warned about. I got him when he was seven weeks and learned fast that play time is only play time when I say. So he is a good boy that will sleep in with me and ride quietly in the car. Again with the amount of hours I work, he has been staying at my parents house with their three dogs. He has never been on his own and I fear that he won't adjust well with so much change while still a puppy. All suggestions welcome.
 

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I'm assuming you are arranging to attend training classes with him when you are off work. If not, that's the first order of business. Otherwise, snce money will not be a problem, you have a few choices.

1. Hire a dog walker to walk your dog every day during the time that you will be at work.

2. Take your dog to a doggy day care every day.

3. Take your dog to a doggy day care for a few days a week and hire a dog walker for the other days that you are at work

You dog is still a bit young for you to get a second dog. His training is far from complete at six months old. You time is limited, even thougn your financial reaources are not, and you have to make the most of that time with your dog. Time is the best thing you can spend on your dog, Two dogs will require a great deal more time from you, than will one dog.
 

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I to would either get a dog walker, or if your dog gets along with all other dogs take him to doggy daycare, he does not have to go to doggy daycare every day though, you could get another dog to keep him company, but you will still need to get someone in to walk him, and then you would have to pay for two dogs, aswell as food and vet bills and stuff for two dogs, which of course is fine if you can do that.
 

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Where on the west coast are you moving? Oregon and Washington are hotspots for dog sports: agility, disc, nosework, flyball, pretty much anything you could want to do. I'd suggest taking up a sport so that you can really make your time with him count. I also agree with the dog walker suggestion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
I am not familiar with dog walkers and even at the cost of being uncomfortable with having a stranger at my house when I'm not around, I would be willing to give it a shot. Again I'm not concerned with the cost but how much do they generally run? And how long do they spend with the dog? I understand this will vary by different services but I'm also curious.

I tried the doggie day care option when I first got my pooch. The problem is that no matter when I'm scheduled, I will never be out of work before at least nine pm and I have not found a single place that offers late pick ups without overnight stays. As a hourly manager, I work approximately forty-five hours a week minimum and with the promotion, I will hit salary and tack over fifteen hours to that. Trust me, I was in love with the idea of dropping him off and picking him up but it just can't happen.

I agree with all that said I should not get another dog because frankly I'm (unless a significant other wanted one) a one-dog person. It would be too much for me but if I need to, I can make anything work. LollyP mentioned getting a cat and that was my original idea. I have no experience with cats however and don't know how to determine if Harvey would get along or how to go about selecting a feline companion for a preexisting dog. Kitten or older cat? I would rather adopt an older cat from a shelter but again, I've been hearing mixed reviews on if I should get one for a herding breed and what age it should be.

GottaLuvMutts, I would be moving to Salem, Oregon from South Carolina and have been trying to get him interested in flyball or fetch in general but he is either stubborn, distracted, or just not keen on the idea. A dog that played fetch was one of the reasons I ended up getting a border collie in the first place and disc was what I really wanted to do with him anyhow. On the bright side, he will be happier in a northern climate than here since it is already starting to get embarrassingly hot and it's only the first of Spring.

Thank you for all of your replies, fellas.
 

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GottaLuvMutts, I would be moving to Salem, Oregon from South Carolina and have been trying to get him interested in flyball or fetch in general but he is either stubborn, distracted, or just not keen on the idea. A dog that played fetch was one of the reasons I ended up getting a border collie in the first place and disc was what I really wanted to do with him anyhow. On the bright side, he will be happier in a northern climate than here since it is already starting to get embarrassingly hot and it's only the first of Spring.
I drove thru Salem today on my way to and from an agility trial! Cool place. I also play disc with my dog, and there's a great new disc dog club around here that I helped found a couple of years ago - it's called FLYDO (Flying Disc Dogs of Oregon). Plenty of flyball in the area, too - Muddy Paws practices at a barn in Monmouth.

I bet a 6mo old BC without too much training under his belt is too distracted to take easily to a sport. I highly suggest starting with some basic obedience (if you haven't done that), clicker training, etc. Once you've got the dog thinking that any interaction with you is fun, then you start training harder stuff like how to catch a disc.
 

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I would get settled first and see how it goes, talk to your neighbors and see if anyone can recommend a dog walker or a neighborhood teenager to come by and let your dog out during the day....I would hold off on a second dog, if you are going to be busy a second dog will be more work and they might get into trouble together. My border collie is very sensitive to change and if yours is similar you might expect some housetraining setbacks or some nutty behavior at first....I would recommend getting into a routine as soon as possible. Good luck.
 
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