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Hello,
Within the next year, I plan on moving to an urban city from a suburban campus town. To be specific, from Champaign, Illinois to Seoul, South Korea.

I've got two dogs; a Jack Russell mutt and a Greyhound and they have completely different personalities. The Jack, Scruffy, often gets overly excited while walking outside. He simply loves people, and will go nuts when walking by/near someone. The greyhound, Rolo, is shy/scared of people. She will try and avoid getting anywhere close to anyone other than myself.

This normally isn't a problem where I am currently living. I live in a campus town (suburbs I guess), and my particular neighborhood is very quiet. I live in a townhouse complex, but we only come across a handful of other people/dogs at most during our walks. When Scruffy gets too excited from a distance, I can simply turn around and walk away to where there are no distractions.

When I move to Seoul, we will be right in the middle of an extremely busy city. A lot of constant city noise, stimuli and people. I'm already starting to dread the walks I'll have to take. I can only imagine that Scruffy will be barking nonstop and Rolo will be trying to run away from just about anything. (For some reason she freaks out about inanimate objects like trashcans, parked cars, certain bushes, shadows, and random sounds...just about anything she's unfamiliar with) My biggest concern is whether or not Scruffy will ever get used to walking past a person without going nuts. Koreans are less forgiving about dogs barking/lunging at them.

I have tried to train this behavior out of him, but it only seems to go so far. I got him to the point where I can suppress his barking/lunging with a firm 'no' before he starts the majority of the time, but his excited state of mind is something I don't think I'd ever be able to train out of him. It just seems like that who he is.

I'm just concerned how they would adjust to a completely foreign environment.

As a side note, we have a lot of grass in our neighborhood and they always do their business on grass, especially Rolo as she's a female. There will be very minimal to no grass where I live in Korea. Scruffy can pee on lamp posts, but in general, how who they react to there being no grass?
 

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Start working with them separately while you're still in the burbs.

If Scruffy loves people so much, enlist a volunteer or two or five. I'm more than willing to bribe people. Have this person approach and constantly reinforce(treats and praise) Scruffy for SITTING calmly. It's okay to look at the person but not spaz. If he just gets too jazzed about it, the volunteer turns and walks away instantly and the flow of treats/praise stops. Practice reinforcing the good behavior in all kinds of situations. I took my last foster dog and practiced obedience exercises in front of a busy grocery store.

As for Rolo, she needs to have good experiences near the things that frighten her. Sometimes, it's just a matter of exposure. You could teach her to target. She touches the trash can(whatever) that scares her, receives a big reward, and builds a positive association with this object. Dogs do NOT generalize well. So teaching her that trash cans aren't scary might not help her with a fear of parked cars, tree stumps, etc.
 

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I'd do what Tofu_pup recommended. But I'd also like to add that with the sudden flood of people everywhere, all the time, Scruffy might actually not be so people-driven once you guys are established in Seoul. Or I may be wrong... Is there a way to take him to a crowded area or event anywhere?
Also, when Soro was a puppy he used to be distracted by people on walks (I lived in suburbia), but we lived in the NYC area, so exposing him to people-dense areas desensitized him to their presence. When we'd go back to an environment where there was only one person on the sidewalk again, he'd get distracted again. But as he grew up the desensitizing started to stick. Today, he's still as people oriented as ever, but we can nudge by a person on our walks and he won't even miss a beat. So no worries, it CAN be done. An urban environment might be the perfect place for it too!
Otherwise, I hope your move goes well! Not gonna lie, I'm more than a bit jealous that you'll have access to all that Korean food! :D
 

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I know this isn't exactly what you asked advice for, but why Seoul?
Have you been to Seoul before?
Do you have a place to live lined up that will accept dogs? Housing is super expensive in Seoul and most of the apartments are tiny. The Koreans in the cities tend to only have very small lap dogs like Bichons or toy poodles. There's a fair amount of green space in Seoul but not grass on every block like suburbia. Your female dog might prefer to find a place with mulch or dirt instead of concrete if possible.
If you're Korean and moving back there, it makes sense to me. But if I were going to just move to Korea now with 2 dogs, I'd probably try to live in a smaller city. My dog loves crowds, but even he would probably be overwhelmed.

As far as the dogs, lots of treats for good behavior and expect them both to regress when you get to Korea. Smell is very important to dogs of course, and the streets in Korea smell far different than in the US with all the street food being cooked and all the exhaust from traffic etc. People also smell different (due to diet) which may kind confuse the dogs. If you have a car, go out to the mountains for some great hiking with the dogs.
 

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For Scruffy -
My Sierra is very people oriented - she used to hit the end of her leash, whine, bark, wag her whole body and jump at them (and on them if they were close enough). I found "no" did nothing long term. It got her attention for a bit but it didn't last. We started doing focus work instead. First in the house and then outside (when no one was around) we worked on "watch me" and sitting for all affection. We then moved outside and worked on these while no one else was around and then over to the shopping mall (outdoor). Every time a person would pass I would have her sit and watch me while they walked by. If the person wanted to pet her she had to remain seated. Redirecting her has worked more than demanding the behavior stop with a "no." Just a thought for something to do with Scruffy...
For you shy girl - work on plenty of positive experiences around everything. Any calm, gentle behavior around a feared object is to be praised. Start working now because I bet Seoul is even busier and has more feared objects.
 
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