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Discussion Starter #1
The saga regarding getting my foster dog adopted continues...
So tonight I met with a nice, older couple in a neutral location, per my rescue group's instructions to screen potential adopters over the phone, then arrange a meet and greet. Sophie is currently listed as best as an only dog, but potentially OK for another dog in the household with careful introductions.

Great news is that she greeted the couple, both husband and wife, VERY well. Waggy tail, face kisses when they were solicited, and flopping on her back for belly rubs after 5 minutes. Such a change from the dog that growled at every man and nearly every woman when she arrived two months ago.

The couple insisted upon bringing their dog, even though I suggested over the phone that we might want to limit it to humans for the first meeting. They left her in the car at first, but the husband decided that Sophie and the dog should meet after about 15 minutes. Sophie actually did very well with the dog, who was larger than her by about 10 pounds and older by about 3 years. She was boisterous, and got a couple of growls from the older female, but eventually both were play bowing at each other, and Sophie was on her back several times pawing at the other dog's face. Very playful. But I could NOT relax. I kept expecting Sophie to grab the other dog's face, after seeing her do that with the puppy in the dog park the other day. Yeah, the puppy wasn't injured, but I never want to see Sophie's jaws on another dog again. The meetup was stressful for me, and I don't want to go through it again.

So what do I do? Insist that Sophie be listed as single dog home only? But that will severely limit her potential adopters, won't it? And she actually did very well with this dog. But I simply cannot go through the anxiety of dog-dog meetups with her.
 

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Do you think she genuinely could do just fine in a household that has another dog with supervision and slow introductions? If yes, then I don't think it'd be fair to have them list her as a single dog only home since, like you said, it will limit her potential adopters. Can you just contact the person who arranges/manages the meetups and ask for advice? Is it possible somebody else could bring her?
 

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My dog would not take well to a boisterous puppy running towards her, but does fare very well after slow intros to appropriate dogs. We've been staying with my dad's pit mix for the past four days and she shows no signs of not being able to co-exist with a mild-mannered dog like my dad's. They get along very well. I was singing quite the different tune when we first tried to introduce them, too! I have threads about all that mess if you want to read them. But now you'd never know :)

I agree that contacting the rescue/shelter to see if they could help facilitate dog meet & greets if you aren't comfortable alone would be your best bet. You want to be realistic knowing she isn't going to do well in a pack full of energetic puppies, but also don't want to limit her if living with another dog or two would be possible, you know?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The thing is, I'm not sure whether or not she could live peacefully with another dog. It's so hard when you've only known them for two months, you know? And in that two months she's changed so much. Instead of growling at/barking at nearly every stranger, she is on her back offering her belly with strangers after two minutes. At the end of her first week here, she growled at my dog simply for sniffing her butt. Now she greets dogs appropriately most of the time.

I experienced several scary/tragic incidents with pitbull and pitbull mix fosters/adoptees in the past. I thought after 10 years I'd gotten over them, but after seeing Sophie grab that puppy's face the other day, I realize that I'm flashing back to those memories. I'm afraid that the fear/stress/anxiety I'm feeling will be picked up by Sophie and taint any meetings she has with potential new canine housemates. I think you all are right--I need to contact the rescue and see whether there is anyone else who can help facilitate doggie meetups. I am 100 percent comfortable interacting with Sophie myself, and supervising meetings with people. It's just the dog-dog meetings that freak me out.
 

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The foster is young correct? She could mature into a dog that is less tolerant or dog-friendly as she reaches full maturity around 2-3 years of age. To me she sounds like a candidate NOW for a potential multi-dog home (based on internet posts - so obviously I can't see the whole picture), but the family should be willing to acknowledge that over time she may change.

But in the end it shouldn't be your call if you're not comfortable with the meet-ups. Definitely check in with the rescue and see what they advise! I know how difficult anxiety can make these types of situations, I've dealt with similar issues in the past. Sorry this is becoming so stressful, but I hope everything works out and she finds a great home :)
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Thanks for the understanding, eenypup. I would be interested in reading about your introductions w/your dad's dog. How would I find them?

And yes, Sophie is young--estimated at 20 months or so. So dog aggression could still kick in. I have first-hand experience with that--one of the aforementioned scary/tragic incidents. :(

I had a thought this morning. The rescue's normal protocol is to direct inquiries to the foster and have them screen over the telephone and arrange meetups if desired. My thought is that I could require that first meetups are humans only. Then, if the applicants are still interested, they need to fill out the application and be screened by the rescue. Then, if it's still a "go," after that, dog-dog meetups can be arranged. Maybe at that point we could have someone else from the rescue step in and help facilitate. I don't think this is unreasonable. There are plenty of rescues that won't even allow you to SEE the dog you're interested in until the app. is filled out and references are checked. What do you think?
 

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I don't think that's unreasonable. Really anyone looking to adopt Sophie who has another dog needs to understand that it's possible those dogs might not get along in the future. They may be fine the rest of their lives as well but they have to be prepared to deal with the possibility they won't be.
 

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I've seen what the powerful jaws of these bully types can do. I have the scars on my left arm to prove what one bite can do (250 stitches from redirected dog aggression). I saw another pit mix kill a smaller dog with one bite to the head. These dogs, with their powerful jaws, are nothing to mess with. I feel confident in Sophie's people friendliness, but not her dog-dog temperament. And because of what I've seen, I just don't want to put myself into situations where I'm not 100 percent confident with her.
 

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I've seen what the powerful jaws of these bully types can do. I have the scars on my left arm to prove what one bite can do (250 stitches from redirected dog aggression). I saw another pit mix kill a smaller dog with one bite to the head. These dogs, with their powerful jaws, are nothing to mess with. I feel confident in Sophie's people friendliness, but not her dog-dog temperament. And because of what I've seen, I just don't want to put myself into situations where I'm not 100 percent confident with her.
I had a dog that tried to kill every dog he saw, so I know your fears very well. I think that anyone who's not willing to consider that Sophie might have to be separated from other dogs isn't the right home for her. This might make it more difficult to initially find a home, but it will prevent her from ending up right back in rescue.
 
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