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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a male husky puppy of 9 months old and I found a husky girl of 2 years and 4 months and I want to breed them. The girl's owner agreed to breed his female husky since she is clearly old enough. We decided to breed the dogs in february because then the husky girl will want to breed. In february, my dog will be 15 months old. Is it safe to breed him at that age? I think a better question is that if it is possible since male dogs doesn't have to do that much in the breeding process. For females is risky to breed at an younger age. Is the avarage male husky fertile at 15 months?
 

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Generally, minimum two years is when ethical and reputable breeders breed their stock, both male and female. This is because by two years old they are fully grown, their temperament and personality is set, and any genetic health issues are able to be tested for. They have also had time to be evaluated by a non-biased third party, whether that be as working dogs or in the show ring. Reputable breeders do not want to pass on genetic health issues like hip dysplasia, nor do they want to pass on the genes of a dog whose temperament is not sound and stable.

You can see the recommended health screenings for huskies here.

So, to answer your initial question, yes, a 15 month old can breed...but you're essentially breeding a teenager. Both their body and mind is still developing and although you have a pretty good idea of what you're going to get, lots of genetic temperament problems like dog aggression, anxiety, fearfulness, etc. tend to pop up in this formative period. You do not want to pass on your dog's genes to a whole new litter of puppies if any of those things are present. You cannot reliably test for genetic health issues until 2 years of age, and you do not want to pass hip dysplasia or other debilitating issues on to a litter of puppies.
 

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I'm not very good at identifying flags, so I'm not sure where you are from, but your country's kennel club might have age requirements for the sire and dame in order to register the puppies. Kennel club requirements aside, males can be fertile as early as six months. However, just because they can sire a litter at a young age doesn't mean they should, for the reasons Lillith mentions.

Well, I know you can't get reliable results from certain genetic health screenings until at least 2 years of age.

...you plan to do those, right?
Genetic, or DNA, testing can be done at any age. Other things, like hips, elbows, eyes, and dentition, generally need to be done as an adult.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
This is Romania's flag. We don't have the culture of dogs. On the streets there are tramp dogs breeding uncontrollably. I don't want show dogs or work dogs. I just have a dog as a pet and I want to breed it. I understand the risks of bad genes being propagated trough the dogs and if my dog has hip dysplasia his puppies might have it too and his grandchilds and so on. For agression I am not worried, he is the most well-behaved dog I have ever seen. I think I don't want his eventual puppies to be cursed the whole life with dysplasia so I think I can wait 1 more year when he will be 2 and the girl will be 3.
 

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So my question to you is WHY do you want to breed him? You indicate it's not for show or working and your dog is just a pet. So what happens with these puppies that you make?

Will you keep them all? As this dog is a pet, are you prepared to have 4 to 6 additional pets? Even if you split the pups with the other dog's owner, you'll have an additional 2 to 3 pets to care for.

Do you plan on selling them? How will you ensure that they do not become part of the "tramp dog" culture and just left out to breed indiscriminately? Will you guarantee for potential health issues? Why would a potential buyer want your puppies rather than a puppy from a show or working line? Will you undercut their puppy cost? If so, will you ensure they are going to quality homes and not some person who just wants to cut into the market and breed the puppy indiscrminately? If a home doesn't work out will you take the dog back? At any age? Are you prepared to do so? What if the returned dog doesn't get along with your pet? How will you handle that?

You mention grandpuppies, does this mean you are going to breed more than just this one dog this one time and/or breed the puppies?

You mention Romania's street dogs, but what about the shelter situation? Are shelters inundated with dogs needing homes? Or is it common for folks to just dump unwanted dogs on the streets? Do you want to potentially be a part of this? Do you want to potentially see the puppies or their childen in a shelter or on the street?

None of this is to tell you that breeding your dog is wrong, but to get you to really decide if it is right for you and your dog. Breeding dogs isn't just about "he's such a great dog and I would love one of his puppies", but a responsibility to ALL the puppies that come from that breeding. It really needs a lot of thought and preparation beyond the actual puppies.
 
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OK, I don't understand this. You want to breed your dog, in a place that is overrun with street dogs that are not cared for, fed properly or at all, and are suffering as a result. But you want to make more dogs in this place. Why? Just because you have a nice dog? That is not a good reason for making more dogs....there could be 9 puppies in one litter.....that will probably end up on the streets like all the others.

As Toedtoes says, if you create or help to create a bunch more dogs, you should be able and willing to take full responsibility for those dogs for their entire lives. Otherwise, you are breeding irresponsibly. We do not need more dogs. We need more people who take good care of the dogs that are already here. Breeding your dog just because you feel like it is not a good enough reason.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So my question to you is WHY do you want to breed him? You indicate it's not for show or working and your dog is just a pet. So what happens with these puppies that you make?

Will you keep them all? As this dog is a pet, are you prepared to have 4 to 6 additional pets? Even if you split the pups with the other dog's owner, you'll have an additional 2 to 3 pets to care for.

Do you plan on selling them? How will you ensure that they do not become part of the "tramp dog" culture and just left out to breed indiscriminately? Will you guarantee for potential health issues? Why would a potential buyer want your puppies rather than a puppy from a show or working line? Will you undercut their puppy cost? If so, will you ensure they are going to quality homes and not some person who just wants to cut into the market and breed the puppy indiscrminately? If a home doesn't work out will you take the dog back? At any age? Are you prepared to do so? What if the returned dog doesn't get along with your pet? How will you handle that?

You mention grandpuppies, does this mean you are going to breed more than just this one dog this one time and/or breed the puppies?

You mention Romania's street dogs, but what about the shelter situation? Are shelters inundated with dogs needing homes? Or is it common for folks to just dump unwanted dogs on the streets? Do you want to potentially be a part of this? Do you want to potentially see the puppies or their childen in a shelter or on the street?

None of this is to tell you that breeding your dog is wrong, but to get you to really decide if it is right for you and your dog. Breeding dogs isn't just about "he's such a great dog and I would love one of his puppies", but a responsibility to ALL the puppies that come from that breeding. It really needs a lot of thought and preparation beyond the actual puppies.
I bought my husky from someone with a dog as a pet who bred his dog and sold them online, they sold them all. I want to sell the puppies also. The last thing I want is for the pups to end up on streets, starving. I will sell the pups to someone who wants a pet dog not a work dog and to someone who seems a good person who wouldn't throw his dog on streets. I mentioned grandpups as an example of propagated genes, after I sell the pups I can't breed them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
OK, I don't understand this. You want to breed your dog, in a place that is overrun with street dogs that are not cared for, fed properly or at all, and are suffering as a result. But you want to make more dogs in this place. Why? Just because you have a nice dog? That is not a good reason for making more dogs....there could be 9 puppies in one litter.....that will probably end up on the streets like all the others.

As Toedtoes says, if you create or help to create a bunch more dogs, you should be able and willing to take full responsibility for those dogs for their entire lives. Otherwise, you are breeding irresponsibly. We do not need more dogs. We need more people who take good care of the dogs that are already here. Breeding your dog just because you feel like it is not a good enough reason.
There are tramp dogs on street, however the government decided to euthanize those after a kid was killed by one those dogs.
 

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Honestly, this is NOT a good idea. You have little to no experience with breeding dogs. You are looking for a way to make some easy money in a manner that is anything but easy.

If you perform the needed testing, provide appropriate care for the mother dog and puppies (including basics like deworming and vaccinations, not to mention any problems that may occur), and a quality food, you will not make money in this deal.

And if your efforts to ensure a good home for the puppies consists of selling the pups to "someone who seems a good person who wouldn't throw his dog on streets", I can guarantee that at least one puppy will end up in a bad home.
With your government euthanizing abandoned dogs, I think you are very misguided in breeding your dog.
 
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I don't breed it for money. I just want to see and have(for a short period of time) cute little husky pups
If you want to spend time with cute little puppies, then volunteer at a shelter.

If you want to see cute liitle husky pups, check out youtube.

But don't bring a bunch of puppies into the world so you can have a few weeks of pleasure from them.

Not only are you doing wrong by those puppies, you are doing wrong by your dog. You are being totally selfish and ignoring the fact that those are living creatures and not only need, but deserve, people to put their well-being ahead of your temporary wants.
 
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I have been following this post from the outset. Dog related culture in Romania is very different than in the US and Canada.. Britain..

First, stray dogs and foxes in Romania are major vectors of rabies. I recall reading somewhere that if you see a stray street dog in this country you ASSUME it has rabies. The shelters in Romania are kill shelters. Intake dogs may be rabid. This makes volunteering at a shelter VERY different than in other countries.

In the US canine rabies is rare with the only recent confirmed cases coming in from rescues importing dogs from other countries, notably Egypt.

So, to the OP I say this:
If you want yo breed your dog go ahead. I just ask you to do your very best to make sure the puppies land in good homes and be sure these homes will get the puppies vaccinated ESPECIALLY for Rabies at 16 weeks old and again at one year old. Do your best to be sure the buyer will bring the dog back to you should it not work out so you can continue it's rabies vaccination protocols and find another home.

While what you are doing would not be my choice, that was not your question and I am not going to sit as judge and jury. It is YOUR business not mine.

I wish you the best and hope it all works out for you and I hope it works out for the dogs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Of course I will vax them before selling. I bought my dog already vaxed. It is difficult for dogs to live in my country without an owner. 2 years ago 2 soul-less kids coated a labrador puppy thrown on the streets by owners who couldnt take care of it, they coated him in gasoline and ignite the poor pup, just for amusement and they recored it and posted on YouTube. We do have laws to combat animal abuse and an institution called the police of animals and those kids will be in the correction school for the rest of their childhood.
 

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This is not about a cultural difference. This is about breeding living creatures who live for 10-15 years for a very short pleasure romp with cute little puppies.
 

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I'm also confused - OP owns the male dog, not the female. So unless you house the female during whelping, you won't likely see too much of the puppies and you likely won't have very much say in who those puppies are sold to or when.
 

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Having lived in a part of Russia that had serious dog problems, I agree with 3GSD4IPO. Breeding well-bred, wanted dogs isn't contributing to the dog overpopulation problem in those situations. Most of the feral dogs are unadoptable. What will improve the situation is changing the dog ownership culture so people take lifelong responsibility for their pets and their pets' offspring.

As others have said, OP:
1. Wait until the dog is at least 2, so you can see what his adult temperament and health are like, before getting your heart set on breeding.
2. Both he and the prospective mother should at least have hip x-rays to rule out dysplasia and eye exams before breeding, per OFA. Doing a genetic screening through a company like "Embark" is also a great idea.
3. Screen potential buyers carefully and make them sign contracts regarding keeping up on vet care and returning the dogs to you if they can't keep them. Consider pre-arranging the puppies' vaccinations with a local vet so there is no excuse on the part of the new owners.
4. Consider getting an objective third party to evaluate the dog and the bitch before you for sure decide on breeding, someone who can evaluate conformation and/or temperament, like an experienced trainer.
 
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