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What are some of the techniques people have used to teach the dog to settle?

In a related question, my puppy goes berserk every day but the second I reach for a treat, she is an angel. It makes teaching her to leave it, settle, etc. difficult because she knows I have a treat and, for a dated reference, becomes Eddie Haskell. Any thoughts on this? I'm thinking just keeping food with me at all times and she'll either get used to it and go back to her puppy-zilla ways so I can teach her or I'll have the world's best dog. ;)
 

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My favorite technique to teach a dog to settle is to set up something simple (crate, exercise pen, gated area, etc.), leave the dog with a few appropriate chew items, and completely ignore the dog.
I also spontaneously reward calm behavior at times.

What you might inadvertently be doing is teaching your dog that being wild makes you reach for treats. Instead, bring out treats when your pup is naturally being calm and put her in her management space when she is being wild, or simply ignore her if she won't destroy anything inappropriate or go after you.
 

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My method is to dog/puppy proof the room we're in, make dog beds available, keep a bowl of kibble on hand but out of sight and reward the dog (randomly) when he settles on a dog bed or furniture and generally chills out. I have had dogs I had to confine to settle but if I can avoid that, I do - because I see it pretty strongly as more management than training. It prevents the undesirable behavior and that's important because you can't train all the time - but it doesn't teach what you do want outside the crate. So sooner or later you're still going to have to teach and reward it OUT of the crate/ex-pen too.

And honestly, it's entirely possible you're dealing with a situation where your dog has learned 'treat = we're training/doing a thing' and thinks that any time that isn't the case it's Game On Free For All. ...I'd probably keep food on me all the time, yes, but NOT let the dog know you have them until you pull them out of nowhere. Eventually they think you might ALWAYS have food even if you don't and randomized rewards create some really strong behavior. Because "MAYBE THIS TIME-"
 

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Bucky was good at settling in the crate or pen, he'd commit a doggy crime to get put there so he could nap. He had no concept of napping outside confinement and he was 2 years old. During training to down he got the idea that it was possible to remain in one spot for more than one second and was able to generalize that into being comfortable chilling out of confinement.

I leashed him and sat down with some cookies. He revolved at the end of the leash, jumped on me to try to bully me out of treats and after a very long 5 minutes lay down. I marked it with a praise word and tossed a treat away from him so he had to get up to get it. Rinse and repeat. As I started to be able to anticipate a down I switched from praise to a cue word as he was going down and repeated this 10 minute training session the following day. I was interested to see that he understood and was laying down on cue on the third day but what I didn't expect was he was able to lay down and chill out as well. He literally had no clue that it was possible to lay down out of confinement up to that point. This was a young adult dog so he isn't a land shark and did have a bit of a brain but do try this method of down training, maybe your pup can generalize as well.
 
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