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Hello Everyone!

I want to introduce myself as well as my new puppy and see if I can learn some helpful tips as well. I am 25 years old, and I grew up with a Golden Retriever and a Soft Coated Wheaton Terrier. I was scared of dogs as a child (Parents got the Golden as a puppy to help me overcome my fears and it worked very well:rockon:).

I just adopted "My" first puppy, even though I helped out extensively with the responsibilities of our other family dogs. The puppy's name is Brewski, and we (Me and my GF) adopted him two weeks ago from the shelter. Brewski and his litter mates were brought into the shelter in a box only a few days old where they were fostered by a lovely woman who bottle fed them and neurtered them. We adopted him two weeks ago when he was 9 weeks and he is now 11 weeks.

So far, it has been a crazy two weeks full of alot of sleepness nights and hilarious moments, and I am absolutely attached to the little monster known as Brewski. He is doing well with his housetraining, all though he drinks enough water to fill a pool, and hasn't chewed up my favorite things yet.

I have read all the stickies on this forum, and on every other forum out there on top of watching all of kikopups youtube videos, twice. With that being said, I wouldnt mind some personalized advice as well as just an introduction so you guys can enjoy Brewski growing up as much as I will.

Brewski has learned sit, down and touch very well. We are training him mimicking kikopup using postiive reinforcement clicker training. I have started to teach him come (or a recall) as well as stay and have not had alot of success. Some of the obstacles that I have come accross during training are as follows:

1. Brewski does not seem to enjoy praise very much at all. He never really comes over with the purpose of wanting to be pet and when I tell him good boy and give him rubs he seems to care less.

2. He also does not seem to be to interested in pleasing us. Some dogs give there owners that look saying "what can i do for you" and he just seems like we are wasting his time.

When I try to teach him come, he just is not interested and gets easily distracted by the environment.

While teaching him Sit/stay and down/stay he does really well holding the position for a while. But I can not get him to release consistently, and therefore can not train him a good release cue. I try to take a few quick steps to entice him to get up but he just kinda gets out of the position as he feels.

I have many, many other questions to ask, but want at least someone to read the post without being overwhelmed by the size so I will stop with this for now. I appreicate any advice tops you can give me and look forward to being a part of this great resoursce! And of course, pics of my pal, Brewski!
 

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One thing to consider is that Brewski is still a pup.....sometimes when puppies are a large dog breed, people forget how young they really are....and the pups attention span isn't really great yet.

What I would do on a recall is to make sure that I had a yummy treat for him when he does come...some dogs are more stubborn that others, but most any dog will come for a treat. I had my dogs on a long rope, and called "Come" and gently pulled them in and gave them a treat.....I did this over and over, (some dogs take longer than others) and after repetition , it worked. It may take a few days, but Brewski will get on to it.....I would still pet him when I give the treat, and say "good boy" and then do it over....he will start to associate the "good boy" and the treat and that he did some thing good. Maybe start with a rope 15' long and then as he gets better, let the rope get longer and longer......

Hope this helps!
 

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Lots of dogs don't particularly care about praise or petting, though Brewski being so young may be part of it. That's why treats are such a big thing in clicker training. Probably 90% of dogs are food motivated, though sometimes you have to find just the right treat or time training for when the dog is hungry.

Beyond that, praise isn't something dogs inherently understand. My dog will wag his tail a little now if I call him "good", but that took a lot of work using treats to get him to connect "good" to something positive happening. He's always liked petting, but it's like me and hugs: in general, I like being hugged, but there are plenty of times I find it annoying, like when I'm cleaning.

Anyways, Brewski is a cutie!
 

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Thank you for the replies. Can anyone recommend training methods for teaching stay and come?

I have watched Kikopups videos, but the dogs in her videos almost always offer the right behaviours and I do not know how to act when Brewski "ignores" me. Also, when teaching stay, should I teach the command stay or should I teach sit and down to mean sit and stay or down and stay? I have been trying to teach sit to mean sit/stay, but I can not get him to release on cue and feel like hes getting confused.

Also, we are awaiting the DNA results if anyone is interested I will post them once received. Thanks!
 

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I teach stay as a separate command so that you can tell the dog to stay in any position they are already in. Meaning, if you only teach "sit-stay" but the dog is already sitting and you only want him to continue to sit, the command at that point is "Stay" since "Sit" would really confuse him.

Here's how I teach SIT:
First I have the dog in front of me, and I give a treat (a piece of his kibble) every time he looks at me. So long as he has all four feet on the ground (no jumping allowed), then he gets a treat for staring up at me. You can sit in a chair for smaller dogs and puppies. One tiny treat at a time, over and over. Then when the dog gets tired of standing there and his butt hits the ground, I quickly treat. If he stands back up, no treat. Often the dog will sit back down on his own, quickly treat (like 1/2 second max between his butt on the ground and him getting the treat). If he doesn't sit back down, I use the treat as a lure holding a little above his head and slightly back.
I don't yet use the word SIT. Just treat the whole time the dog is sitting and stop treating if he stands.
Once he gets the connection between the action and the treat, I add the word but not as a command before the action. I use the word at the action- meaning, as soon as he sits I am saying SIT and giving a treat. Repeat for awhile (several training sessions over several days). The word has to be firmly attached to the action in his mind before I expect him to follow it as a command.
Then, I will use the command SIT with treats at the ready held behind my back. I don't repeat the command, if he doesn't sit, then I stand there and wait. Usually he will sit, then I will treat and go back to the previous step in the training process a bit longer.

For down, the same thing. I will lure the dog into a down by lowering a treat and then moving the treat away from him in a forward direction so that a sitting dog will usually drop down. You can also sit down with your legs bent to make a V under your knees. With the puppy on one side, hold the treat on the other side of you so that he will lower himself to be able to reach under your legs to the treat. I use a hand signal for each command in addition to the verbal command; pick whatever signal you like as long as you are consistent. Maybe a flat palm-out hand for SIT and a closed hand with two fingers pointing down for DOWN as examples.

I use a closed fist for SIT (fingers facing out), index finger raised from a closed fist for STAY, and the two fingers pointing and doing a little downwards motioning for DOWN.

for the release on cue, I will lightly tug the leash as I say BREAK is a high/happy voice and step back or to the side. I do not give a treat for the release, only praise. My reason for that is I want the sit/stay/down commands to have highest value.

Don't always do the same order of commands. You don't want the dog to learn SIT-DOWN-STAY as a single command. You want to work towards "puppy pushups" meaning changing up the commands so he is going like sit-stay-break-down-break-sit-down-stay etc.
I use BREAK to mean release the stay but NOT come to me. that is a separate thing. To me, the release cue is more like the military "At Ease" command where a soldier doesn't have to stay in a tight formal attention pose but can stand more naturally and move his arms, head and such but needs to remain in place. Then I will say COME or LET'S GO to tell him we are continuing on (I say LET'S GO for when he is on-leash and already next to me but we need to get moving forward; COME is when he is away from me or in the yard and I want him to return to me)
 
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