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Can someone please explain to me what MDR1 is?
All I know is that one of the puppy's parents is a carrier and the other is a son of a carrier so I'm a bit confused on what it is?
Is it something serious that I should stay away from?
 

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MDR1 Mutation, is a mutation in the MDR1 gene that hinders the body's ability to flush certain chemicals from the bloodstream. The chemicals can build up in the brain or organs causing seizures, illness, and even death. Dogs with one copy of the mutation seem to be less affected than dogs with two copies of the mutation but can still suffer side effects.

I have one dog who has one copy of the mutation. It's not really as horrible as it sounds, you simply avoid known specific drugs and use the alternatives.

You can order a test kit to test your dog for the mutation here WSU MDR1 Testing
They also have a list of drugs known to cause problems on that site.
 

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Can someone please explain to me what MDR1 is?
All I know is that one of the puppy's parents is a carrier and the other is a son of a carrier so I'm a bit confused on what it is?
Is it something serious that I should stay away from?
And if one is the son of a carrier, but not a carrier himself, carrier is the worst you're going to get. I'm suspecting if your breeders were knowledgeable enough to test for it, they were probably also knowledgeable enough to breed carrier to clear instead of carrier to carrier (I'd ask, though). Unlike many things, even dogs who are only carriers can have problems with certain meds, but not as serious as a dog who is affected. It's just something your vet needs to be aware of so they don't use the wrong drugs.
 

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First thing to do when you get a collie or Aussie puppy is definitely get the test...there is only one place I know of that does the testing (they send you the test kit and you swab the inside of the dogs mouth and then send in the swab...kit is self-explanatory) (http://www.vetmed.wsu.edu/depts-vcpl/). Site also has drugs to look out for...(FYI: two vets I spoke to were not even familiar with the MDR1 gene) My new puppy (Gracie) tested mutant/mutant (bummer), which means I have to watch every medication, including over the counter ones, for as long as I have her...She can't even have the usual over the counter meds for diarrhea (i.e. Immodium). She will be getting spayed soon, so needed to let her vet know and to make a note on her chart as giving her the wrong anesthesia or medications could kill her. Also, heartworm and other meds can be fatal, even worming meds. She was given Panacur for worms and giardia by our vets, which seemed to work OK for both my dogs and they had no problem taking the powder when mixed with softened ice cream. http://www.vetmed.wsu.edu/depts-vcpl/drugs.aspx

Our older Aussie, Bailey, is mutant/normal, but I'm very cautious with her also. The breeder I purchased the puppy from (celebrityward) said both parents were not positive, but by the time I found out that they were BOTH positive, we had already fallen in love with the puppy.

I think that the MDR1 Gene should be noted as positive or negative on all susceptible dog breeds registering with AKC...and in the case of Australian Shepherds, MASCUSA (mini-Aussies) and ASCA, especially because this could be life-threatening if you are unaware that they have the gene.
 

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Please see my post....if you are looking for a collier or Aussie, be sure to ask if the parents have the gene and decide if this is something you can live with. Many Aussie owners do, as myself, but you have to always be cautious about all meds, even over-the-counter meds, and anesthesia. Just read up on it if you decide to get a puppy or dog who has the gene. :0)
 

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Besides what has been explained, be sure to test your dog, unless both parents are normal/normal. Our dog is mutant/normal, we treat him as if he is mutant/mutant since his type is a "maybe" have a reaction, "maybe" be intolerant... We have an anesthesia plan in file with our vet, when we have had to see specialists this plan as well as the list of meds he cannot have gets sent with his records & our vet has made a point to call the specialist (we had to see an ortho vet & rehab vet last year) just to be sure they are familiar with mdr1.

Once you know what your dog is, like has been mentioned, it isn't a big deal. You find routines for things like flea & heart worm meds.
 

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Both of my dogs are mutant/mutant. It really doesn't make a huge difference in their life. You MUST avoid ivermectin (which can be more difficult if you live in a place where you have to give heartworm prophylaxis). Otherwise, you stay away from Imodium and the vets have to be VERY careful with anesthesia. That's about it. Both of my guys have had anesthesia without problems and I give Interceptor after we travel for heartworm prophylaxis. No big deal.

But it is very important to know if your dog is mu/mu. Go to the Washington State University vet school website (that others have linked above). It gives a lot of good info.
 

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I just went to a MDR1 seminar put on by someone who works at Washington State University. She said that in the heartworm dosage, ivermectin is fine for mutant dogs. I'd be afraid that if another of the drugs that cause a reaction were accidentally given, there would be an issue with the drugs adding onto each other. I still find it better to be safe and not use it.
 

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I'm lucky enough to have a vet that actually had Dr Mealey as a professor, she is the one that found MDR1. My vet asked her what to recommend for flea & heart worm treatment for mutant/normal (Dr Mealey is also the one that created our anesthesia plan). They have done extensive testing on the brands (she emphasized the brand names) and found Frontline Plus & Heartguard to be safe. This is the combo that Skyler has been on since he was old enough to start treatment. I've never looked in to other options since this has done well for him the past 3yrs.
 

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Lloyd (my mix) is mutant/normal. We use non ivermectin heartworm (I use interceptor), and my vet is familiar with the MDR1 mutation, so if he ever needs to go under she knows what to watch for/what to avoid.
 
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