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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I am the owner of a 6 year old beagle who is starting to have accidents again around the house. I have taken her to the vet and she shows no signs of a urinary tract infection or anything of that nature. Sometimes it will happen while I am at work but most times it happens after I've come home and taken her on her evening walk. Now that it is starting to be lighter out later, I have been taking her on walks that can last up to an hour. On these walks she pees as much as she possibly can, as I'm sure she wants to mark her territory all over the neighborhood. She knows that what she does is wrong and she does get disciplined when she goes to the bathroom in the house, but it keeps happening. Does anyone have any advice on what I should be doing? The only thing I can think of is that I have been traveling for work, but when I do, I take her to my parents house where she is really familiar and gets excited to go to. Any suggestions? My work traveling has stopped but the accidents have not...
 

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Hello,

I am the owner of a 6 year old beagle who is starting to have accidents again around the house. I have taken her to the vet and she shows no signs of a urinary tract infection or anything of that nature. Sometimes it will happen while I am at work but most times it happens after I've come home and taken her on her evening walk. Now that it is starting to be lighter out later, I have been taking her on walks that can last up to an hour. On these walks she pees as much as she possibly can, as I'm sure she wants to mark her territory all over the neighborhood. She knows that what she does is wrong and she does get disciplined when she goes to the bathroom in the house, but it keeps happening. Does anyone have any advice on what I should be doing? The only thing I can think of is that I have been traveling for work, but when I do, I take her to my parents house where she is really familiar and gets excited to go to. Any suggestions? My work traveling has stopped but the accidents have not...
How do you discipline her when she goes to the bathroom in the house? Is she going in front of you or is she hiding it?

Does she have constant access to water? Is she crate trained?

Just some questions that will help the members give the best advice..
 

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I put her nose in it and tell her no and point at her while saying it. I also make sure to take her outside right after I've discovered it where I praise her for going out. She hasn't done this in front of me. She usually sneaks downstairs while I am upstairs. She does have constant access to water and she was crate trained for the first 4 years of her life but has been fine without a crate until now. As I said before she waits until after her evening walk to do it and its usually within the hour after walking her.
 

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Putting a dog's nose in it and scolding will do more harm than good. You'll make the dog not trust you, because they don't relate something that already happened to what you are doing. To them, what you are doing is showing them pee and yelling at them. They don't have the ability to figure out that it is the act of peeing indoors that you don't like. What will usually result is a dog that will try to not pee where you see them. Stop doing that. If she has an accident, smack yourself for not supervising, and clean it with an enzyme cleaner like "Nature's Miracle" or "Kids n Pets", to remove the smell so she won't return there.

If she's spayed, it could be the start of spay incontinence. There are meds for that. Has your vet checked bloodwork? Diabetes/Cushings/thyroid problems can make them drink more. Often, having accidents is one of the earliest symptoms of Cushings.

Bloodwork should be done, and urine should be checked for crystals/ultrasound done.
 

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Yea she's gotten a whole slew of tests with nothing coming back to explain why she is doing this. How am I supposed to discipline her? I feel that ignoring it will only cause her to think it is ok and keep going around the house. Like I said before, it usually happens after I walk her and she has already peed. She doesn't have accidents during the day when I am not there, only after I get home and I've taken her out.
 

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Dogs do not rationalize. They only understand punishment and praise WHILE they are doing an activity. So, if the dog is only urinating when you can't see her, it's your obligation to make sure she is in sight all the time.

If she's always urinating right after getting home, try kenneling her right after walks for an hour or so and then taking her back out. If she is 'marking territory,' she might not be actually urinating like she needs to.

It may also be a good idea to NOT let her constantly mark territory. You are in charge, and it is your job to tell her when she's allowed to do such a thing; That is how dogs operate in a pack. Have her keep her head upright and focus on whats ahead when on walks, and only stop once or twice to allow her to sniff and pee. Once she figures out that it's not her 'job' to mark territory, I imagine things will go much more smoothly. Helping re-assert that you are the dominant one might help solve a lot of issues.

Since beagles are very scent driven, cleaning properly is the MOST important thing. If you catch her sniffing around, especially where she has already peed, immediately take her out until she pees and clean the area again.

I still think it is more likely a medical issue though. Dogs generally do not 'unlearn' learned behaviors. If she pees in her kennel, its almost certainly medical. When we had a dog suffering from incontinence, we got a doggie door - Since there was such a small window between the dog realizing it needed to go and it actually going, that was about all we could do. She was then fine, she always made it out in time. This is obviously not an option in all living situations, but is certainly a good option if it IS an option.
 

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I agree with much of Eeloheel's post except the pack walk stuff. That's just CM marketing nonsense, IMO.
Part of the walk, especially that of a scent hound should be sniffing and marking because it is MENTALLY stimulating, but you can put it on cue and use it as a reward for walking nicely..

to the OP:
If she's marking repeatedly on walks she's likely not fully emptying her bladder...going to get a drink after her walk and then has to go again...if you know that she needs to go after her walk/drink and it only happens in the evening then here's the plan: Come back from your walk, let her have a drink, take her back outside shortly after (and keep her with you until then) and stand there til she pees and REWARD HER. Make sure she's had a good pee. Try eventually putting it on cue.

Make sure you clean all accidents up with a good enzyme based cleaner. Do NOT punish her, all you do is cause more stress about you and pee. It's unfair to punish a dog for housetraining accidents...especially when it is likely there IS an underlying physical cause as she never had this issue before.

So, on the health front:
What's her water intake like? Has there been any change in appetite or other changes in behaviour? There are many illnesses that can cause urinary issues that are not infections...like cushings and diabetes mellitus. If you practice the taking her out again after her walks and get success I wouldn't worry too much about it, but if you see changes in her drinking or eating habits then it's worth talking to your vet about looking at organ based issues.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Her water intake seems pretty normal and her appetite hasn't changed much either. I am going to give the extra walk thing a try and see how it goes. Thanks!
 

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Did your vet do a full blood workup? Normally they don't unless you specifically ask for it. I'd bet it was a general examination, and maybe a urine sample.
 
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