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Hi! Match me a breed please. I posted a couple times but have added needs and wants.

Medium to large breed 20-100 lbs
Medium to high energy, with an off switch
Easy to train, can have some stubbornness
Biddable
Good with other dogs, cats, and kids
I do like dogs that look intimidating but not a must. I however want a dog that is aloof or can be trained to ignore people. I do understand that training needs to be done for protection but I would want a dog that would have my back.
Sport dog for agility, dock diving, and flyball
I love training fun tricks and obedience
Shedding is fine. I do prefer long or short coat. Cost that I can upkeep at home that doesn’t require a groomer.
Velcro dog is preferred, and one that wouldn’t wonder or stray away (my current dog would bolt away and not come back when called)

I do have some allergies to certain breeds/coats not sure why exactly. But I react to mostly labs and pitbulls. (Funny tho my dog has pit and lab in her but I don’t react to her unless she hasn’t had a bath in a while)

My list:
Border collie
Australian shepherd
German shepherd

I usually get the same breeds so I’m open to all unique and common breeds.
 

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Hi! Match me a breed please. I posted a couple times but have added needs and wants.

Medium to large breed 20-100 lbs
Medium to high energy, with an off switch
Easy to train, can have some stubbornness
Biddable
Good with other dogs, cats, and kids
I do like dogs that look intimidating but not a must. I however want a dog that is aloof or can be trained to ignore people. I do understand that training needs to be done for protection but I would want a dog that would have my back.
Sport dog for agility, dock diving, and flyball
I love training fun tricks and obedience
Shedding is fine. I do prefer long or short coat. Cost that I can upkeep at home that doesn’t require a groomer.
Velcro dog is preferred, and one that wouldn’t wonder or stray away (my current dog would bolt away and not come back when called)

I do have some allergies to certain breeds/coats not sure why exactly. But I react to mostly labs and pitbulls. (Funny tho my dog has pit and lab in her but I don’t react to her unless she hasn’t had a bath in a while)

My list:
Border collie
Australian shepherd
German shepherd

I usually get the same breeds so I’m open to all unique and common breeds.
Boxer... 🥊
 

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I'd consider the rough/smooth collie as well - they're on my radar if I ever want a farm dog or herding breed. Not much personal experience, but my understanding is that they have a lot of the herding breed traits but are a bit less intense in general than many border collies.

A standard poodle fits all your requirements except grooming, but I thought I'd throw it out there. I actually groom my curly boys myself at home, and if you clip down to a short sporting or kennel clip every six weeks there's minimal upkeep between grooms. There is a bigger up-front cost doing it yourself, getting the clippers, appropriate blades, coat product, combs, etc., but depending on groomer costs in your area, it pays for itself surprisingly quickly.

Doberman, with the caveat that there's some serious health issues in the breed, so looking for a breeder who can demonstrate the longevity of their lines is super important.

The four Belgian Shepherd varieties are worth looking into - I think the AKC recognizes them as separate breeds, but internationally they're recognized as varieties of the same breed. That's Malinois, Tervuren, Groenendael, and Laekenois. They're extremely similar behaviorally, but you'll find more Malinois being bred for bite sports/protection work, so they can be more intense/drivey than the other varieties, so the others may be a better fit for you. Not super experienced with these dogs so I can't give you an in-depth breakdown on what lines are out there, but worth having on your radar.

And for something a little more out there, Chodsky Pes, also known as the Bohemian Shepherd. They're not fully recognized by the AKC yet because there aren't many in the US, but they're part of the Foundation Stock Service and are an old breed, just not a common one outside of their home country. Looks somewhere in between collie and shepherd, and a great, versatile dog. Probably a lot harder to find than the others on this list, but my obedience instructor has one so it's on my mind.
 

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Any of the three on your list would fit the bill. It would be very important to select a breeder that breeds for exactly what you want, however. It is standard for many herding breeds to be wary of or aloof with strangers, but bad breeding can lead to them being outright afraid of strangers and cower or show fear aggression. There are breeders who breed for high drive working and performance dogs, and breeders who breed more for show or don't focus so much on getting that drive, and breeders who shoot for somewhere in between.

Also, all of those breeds are a bit hyper and need to be taught to settle when they're young. It does get better with age, of course, but know that the off switch doesn't always come standard.

Other breeds I would suggest are the rough or smooth Collie, which posses the biddability and intelligence of Aussies and BCs, but are less intense and less RUN UNTIL I BLEEEEEED. I've seen many compete in agility, and although they are not as fast as your smaller BCs they are impressive to watch and move at a steady clip. Selecting a puppy from a breeder whose breeding stock compete in sports or work would get you a faithful companion more than happy to accompany you on any outing.

A field bred Golden Retriever might be another consideration. We have several at our club, and they can be intensely focused on their job and are blazing fast agility dogs. One person does both hunting and agility with theirs, and their main complaint is they can be a bit immature and stupid in their youth, but they do shape up by 2.5 to 3 years. Although the ones I know are generally quite social and will gladly accept attention from complete strangers, they are biddable and handler focused when asked.
 

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If you do decide to look into Dobermans, as mentioned, they have serious health concerns, including dilated cardiomyopathy. Breeders should be doing an annual 24 hour holter monitoring and cardiac ultrasound (aka echo) on breeding dogs. The two know genetic markers are not indicative of a dog's probability for developing DCM, and should be done more for research purposes than breeding decisions. When looking at pedigrees, look for dogs with a Longevity Certificate (LC) and dogs with Bred For Longevity (BFL) notations. It's still no guarantee, but it does help stack the odds in your favor.
 
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