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Discussion Starter #1
Has anybody experienced this with their dog? Mine had it three years ago and was treated with a high dosage of steroids. It was awful. I know it can come back at any time.
I've searched high and low and can't find any kind of info on preventative treatments/supplements. Maybe there aren't any, but I want to make sure I'm not missing anything.
 

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never heard of it... Am so sorry for your little one and hope he continues to do well.. I found this

http://www.vetsonline.com/publications/veterinary-times/archives/n-43-35/masticatory-muscle-myositis-in-dogs.html


just one portion of the page "" ""

Therapy

Therapy for acute and chronic cases of MMM consists of immunosuppression with corticosteroids. In the acute cases, oral prednisone at 1mg/kg to 2mg/kg twice daily is given until the jaw function returns to normal. Physical therapy should be started as soon as possible in an attempt to normalise the masticatory muscles’ tone and to increase the jaw opening. Encouraging the dog to play with tennis balls or chew rawhide is recommended. Most dogs cannot eat properly and food should be blended to a consistency for licking. In most cases, a rapid clinical improvement is seen. Once the jaw function returns to normal, the prednisone dose is gradually tapered down and is maintained for four to six months.

Therapy for chronic cases of MMM consists of corticosteroids at 0.25mg/kg 0.5mg/ kg twice daily for about one month. The dose can be then slowly tapered down. The most common causes of treatment failure in MMM, as in other autoimmune diseases, are inappropriate therapy and too early discontinuation of the drug(s).

Other immunosuppressive agents, such as azathioprine, ciclosporin A or mycophenolate mofetil, may be indicated in dogs that fail to respond to corticosteroids, that relapse when the dose is tapered or that show severe side effects from the corticosteroids. Adjunctive immunosuppressive therapy in veterinary medicine is largely based on clinical experience.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I appreciate you looking that up! That is basically what her treatment was. I was hoping there was some kind of preventative support after treatment but there doesn't appear to be any :-(
 
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