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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a golden retriever male (18 weeks) and a Labrador female (12 weeks)

I am concerned because the retriever is a little...horny and is often found humping the female.

The vet said that at this age his penis is a 'useless instrument' but I am worried he could hurt her internally? she doesn't seem to mind at all and otherwise they get on brilliantly even to the point of pining for eachother of they are separated.

Obviously they are both too young to be spayed - can anyone offer advice? A
 

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I very much doubt that he can hurt her at this point, and she will tell him off if she has a problem with what he's doing.

It does concern me that you talk about them pining for each other when separated. Read this page about littermate syndrome:

In addition to one puppy becoming shy, there are other behavioral implications for two puppies who are adopted at the same time. Oftentimes even the “bold” puppy turns out to be quite nervous and uncertain when separated from his or her littermate. Furthermore, the puppies frequently become incredibly co-dependent, exhibiting heartbreaking anxiety when separated from one another. They often fail to bond to their human family as strongly as they otherwise would, or sometimes at all. At social maturity, these puppies may begin fighting with one another, sometimes quite severely.

Even puppies who are not related can exhibit littermate syndrome when placed together. Professional trainers recommend against getting two puppies within six months of one another, because the risks are just too high. This doesn’t even take into consideration the other practical considerations, such as the increased costs of vet care, food, supplies, and training; the extra work of training and caring for two dogs; or the time requirements of two active puppies.

Can littermate syndrome be prevented? Theoretically, yes, however it’s so difficult as to be nearly impossible in practice. Remember, even experienced guide dog puppy raisers aren’t expected to be able to prevent this issue from developing. At a bare minimum, the two puppies would need to be crated and cared for separately, including separate walks, training classes, and playtime with their owners. The puppies need to have more one-on-one time with their new owners than they have with each other, effectively doubling the work and negating any of the possible benefits (i.e. companionship) that they were adopted together for in the first place.
You can Google "littermate syndrome" for lots more info. Good luck with your pups! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Great

Yes we are working on this, we walk them separately and are trying to build their confidence individually. They are rescued pups (non related) and the shelter wanted them adopted together. Hopefully they will be ok
 
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