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Hello, I'm not a first time puppy owner, but I am a first time mal owner, I have an American Eski (Casper-yes, hes friendly) and now a Mal pup (Grey).

Grey is 9 weeks old and sitting at 17 lbs he was 15lbs last week. From charts online they indicate he'll be massive, but he is supposed to be a standard size, not a giant.

How many of ya'll have had mals and what size were they at 8-9 weeks? 20180722_233223-800x600.jpg
 

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Well, the charts just show an 'average' and not all puppies are going to follow the same growth trajectory. They often wind up pretty inaccurate, especially for younger dogs. How big were his parents? That'll probably give you a better estimate for his adult size!

He's a real handsome fellow, btw.
 

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That's what's hard, his mom is 90 and dad is about 110 but the thing that has us guessing is that the the breeders mom was breeding "giants" so the bitch may have been from a giant line but you're probably right. It's just hard not to be super inquisitive about how he'll grow up.

Here's one more picture just because I can. ^_^
 

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I'd guess he will end up 110 to 120 lbs. My wolfdogs, who end up 120-125 are right at 18-22 lbs at 10 weeks old, nearing 30 - 35 lbs by 16 weeks of age and, yours is a bit under that.
 

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I guessing he'll be 20lbs by the 10 week mark. If he gains 2-3 lbs this week like he did last week.:)

Thank you for the comparison!

I love wolf dogs and actually wanted one but I'm not in the position to give a wolf dog everything it needs (according to their breeders)
 

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Ah, yeah, if that is the case it's certainly possible to have a 'throwback' pup that takes after mom's relatives, even if she herself isn't considered a 'giant'. Though it sounds like both mom and dad are heavier than what the standard outlines. Not that it's a bad thing, just that he'll probably be on the bigger end of the range anyway.

I could see feeding him large breed puppy formula just in case he grows to be a big boy, but other than that, it's just wait and see! I can't help too much with the food though, only ever had my small poodle.
 

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That's what's hard, his mom is 90 and dad is about 110 but the thing that has us guessing is that the the breeders mom was breeding "giants" so the bitch may have been from a giant line but you're probably right. It's just hard not to be super inquisitive about how he'll grow up.
His sire and dam are actually pretty big. From the AKC Standard:

Size, Proportion, Substance: There is a natural range in size in the breed. The desirable
freighting sizes are males, 25 inches at the shoulders, 85 pounds; females, 23 inches at the
shoulders, 75 pounds. However, size consideration should not outweigh that of type, proportion,
movement and other functional attributes. When dogs are judged equal in type, proportion,
movement, the dog nearest the desirable freighting size is to be preferred. The depth of chest is
approximately one half the height of the dog at the shoulders, the deepest point being just behind
the forelegs. The length of the body from point of shoulder to the rear point of pelvis is longer
than the height of the body from ground to top of the withers. The body carries no excess weight,
and bone is in proportion to size.

My guess is that he will likely grow up to be around the same size as his parents.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Yep, I wanted him as close to breed standard
as possible. Hes a little large but otherwise, (so far) I think hell be a stunning example of the breed. ^_^
 

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I guessing he'll be 20lbs by the 10 week mark. If he gains 2-3 lbs this week like he did last week.:)

Thank you for the comparison!

I love wolf dogs and actually wanted one but I'm not in the position to give a wolf dog everything it needs (according to their breeders)
They aren't pets for everyone, that's for sure. Like any northern breed, they are high energy. They don't reach full maturity until age 3, which means you basically have a hyper puppy for three years when you get one. While they are very intelligent, too smart for their own good at times, a high content wolfdog won't train like a normal dog. They can be trained but, that's by one person, the primary care giver/owner and, NEVER with punishment. The most you can do is get their attention, then turn your back to them and ignore them for a couple of minutes to correct them and, reward the good behavior.

They need room to run, lots of exercise and mental stimulation, they climb, dig and jump very well so, enclosures that are escape proof are challenging. You have to do things to socialize them daily to other dogs and, to people as well. Even then, once mature, they tend not to tolerate other dogs well for very long and, they are wary of strangers. It can take them up to six months to warm up to a new family or household member before the new person can even pet them without the primary owner being right beside the dog.

They are definitely NOT guard dogs. A thief could come into your home and take everything while the wolfdog hid and, the dog would let them. Now if the thief tried to take you, that's another matter as far as a wolfdog is concerned. Things don't matter to them, you matter to them. 2 hours is 1.75 hours too long to leave them indoors unattended and, out of their crate - do that and, they will give house broken a whole new meaning by digging carpets, chewing walls, doors and furniture and, shredding whatever they can shred - they are capable of shredding a 2 x 4 board in about an hour.

They howl more than bark and, that howl can be hear up to a mile away, as the crow flies, so, if the neighborhood won't tolerate that, especially in the late fall and winter months, then, you might want to consider a different breed.

Many locations have laws regarding keeping them that are different than normal dogs. Where I live for example, I can only have 4 wolfdogs without a special permit. Even then, I have to have a double fence,six feet tall with an outer fence 3 feet away, also six feet tall and, a double gated entry into their outdoor yard. They are not permitted in many places that are otherwise dog friendly. Like Petsmart, for example. While they can be vaccinated for rabies, if they ever bite anyone, they will still be put down because no rabies vaccine has been tested on them so, the law doesn't recognize that it works and, they don't get rabies once vaccinated. Many vets, boarding kennels and, groomer will not accept wolfdogs. You have to plan trips with them carefully to avoid locations where they are banned.

As far as giving a wolfdog what it needs, if you can provide the legal requirements in your area to own one, have a vet that will treat a wolfdog and, have researched how to train and handle them, then I see no reason you can't have one but, I'd suggest getting a mid content for your first one and, an f3 or f4. Save the f1 and f2 high content wolfdogs for later, when you have some experience with them. I have 1 f3, 2 f2 and one f1. (the f1,2,3, etc) denotes how many generations since there was a pure wolf in their ancestors. f1 means one parent was 100% wolf, f2 a grandparent was a wolf and, so on. Beyond f5, they are dogs, not wolfdogs.)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I know they are challenging and amazing! That's part of the pull for me.

The reason we weren't able to get one, is because aft my research I found that even though I have 8ft fencing around my property, it not enough for a wolfdog. The only other reason I cant get one is because we go out of country once a year for about a month. Which would be unfair to a wolf...

But I'd love to have one, and I'm very jealous of you. Perhaps in a few years when we've slowed down on traveling a bit we can get one.
 
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