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Discussion Starter #1
hi there, i'm new here. i recently put down MY dog, and my father and i have gotten a new one.

she is 11 months old, and we got her from Bideawee in manhattan, they recieved her from a kill shelter down in tennessee. she had been at bideawee for over a month, no one wanting to take her home because she is very hyperactive, disobedient, and a chewer. we took her home on thursday (june 18th). so far we've managed to house train her. actually she kinda did this herself. she'd wake from a sound sleep when either my dad or i went to the bathroom, and she would run in and watch. we put some wee wee pads down in the bathroom, and she started using them on her own, without either of us ever showing them to her or telling her to go there. we're very proud and pleased with this, but she still has a LOT of other major issues.

first of all, she still does not know her name. they were calling her one thing at the shelter, she didnt know or acknowledge that name either, so naturally, we changed it to something else that we liked and thought fit the dog. we named her dusty, and as ive said, she still doesnt know her name. this is an issue because she also does not know "come", so calling her is almost impossible, unless we squeak one of her squeaky toys.

second, she chews. luckily it is just fabrics or paper-like things (dont have to worry about cleaning products or bathroom stuff). sadly this includes any types of cardboard (like boxes) papaer (reciepts, the mail, BOOKS too), ALL articles of clothing: socks, undies, jeans, jackets, towels, sheets, blankets, and... the couch. each cushion is its own separate piece, and she chews them and drags them all over the apartment. just tonite, during her peak hyperactive hours (8-10 pm) she completely disheveled the couch, and started humping the individual parts. i immideately googled "why is my female dog humping things" and found the answer: she is trying to mark her territory and assert her dominance as she thinks she in charge. and this leads into (as did number 1 as well) the final, underlying, and most important issue: she is completely disobedient.

we cannot really afford to take her to obedience classes, so please keep that in mind when responding. we've also tried crate training, went and bought one, set it up, tried coaxing her in, didnt work, then i forcably put her in and she was shaking and just completely terrified, and i cannot do that to the dog. she spent her entire life up until now in a cage and i just cannot continue to do that to her. so after 2 days, i brought the cage back to the store and used the return money to buy her more chew toys.

i've been trying the rewards system, giving her a "treat" (actually just a single piece of dry food) when she does anything good, as telling her "no, stop, bad" has absolutely no effect, but her behavior still is not improving.

she HAS calmed down a bit, for the most part she plays calmly and quietly with her toys, or lays down next to one of us and sleeps peacefully, but when she gets into her hyper mood (usually happens after we come back inside after a walk outside where i let her run free off the leash in the large fenced in grassy area), or when she plays WITH one of us, she is an unholy terror and unstoppable. my last dog was very obedient and well behaved. this is a bit of a culture shock for me, not being able to control the animal in my home.

i just really need some help and advice. i've been watching how to videos on all sorts of websites, and the videos arent really helping. they use dogs that are already trained, "demonstrating" what to do "if" the dog "were to be" doing *insert bad behavior*. but they dont address the issue of.. the dog IS doing this and you TRY the corrective.. whatever and the dog fights you or just ignores you.

somebody please help me!
 

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If you want your dog to learn to respond to his name, only use his name in a positive way. Don't ever use his name while you are scolding him. Also, don't ever ask him to "come" and then scold him. This will teach him that the command "come" is an unpleasant thing. When a dog obeys the "come" command, something positive should always follow. Learning to respond to a new name may take time. My rescue doberman learned to respond to his new name pretty quickly. I'd say about a week. But dogs learn at different rates.

As for the chewing, your dog is still young. Chewing is normal. Provide him with plenty of appropriate chew toys and keep everything else out of reach.

Personally, i think crate training is an extremely valuable tool. I encourage you to not give up on it. But certainly, the crate should absolutely not be traumatic for the dog. Try keeping the kennel in a room where you spend a good deal of time. Keep the door open. Let the dog go in and out as he pleases. If he goes in the crate on his own, give him a treat. From there, you can slowly work towards asking him to go into the crate, and having him spend time in the crate with the door shut. Just don't rush it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thanks, but i already got rid of the crate and spent that money and there isnt another 100 bucks available to get another one, so crate training is kinda out of the question at this point.

today she started responding to her name a bit, hopefully this will make it easier.

and she has about 20 different toys, various materials, but she still seems to prefer the couch and my clothes lol.
 

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she is 11 months old, and we got her from Bideawee in manhattan, they recieved her from a kill shelter down in tennessee. she had been at bideawee for over a month, no one wanting to take her home because she is very hyperactive, disobedient, and a chewer. we took her home on thursday (june 18th).
Welcome to the forum! The first thing you need to remember is that this dog is brand new in your home. Not only is she young and full of energy but she's in a completely different environment. You mentioned it being a bit of a culture shock for you - imagine how she feels ;). Likewise, any training is going to take a bit before it builds a real solid foundation. You have to be patient and persistent with these things and give it more then just a few days before deciding 'oh that won't work'. Your dog isn't so much disobedient as she is simply untrained. She doesn't yet know what is expected of her.

first of all, she still does not know her name. they were calling her one thing at the shelter, she didnt know or acknowledge that name either, so naturally, we changed it to something else that we liked and thought fit the dog. we named her dusty, and as ive said, she still doesnt know her name. this is an issue because she also does not know "come", so calling her is almost impossible, unless we squeak one of her squeaky toys.
This is something that will come with a bit of time. You can help condition her to her name though. When you use it, reward any and all attention she gives you. That means if you say Dusty and she turns her head even for a moment, praise her and reward heavily. Once she starts to get the hang of 'Oh - paying attention when I hear that word is good' you can increase your expectations. Wait for a bit more attention (ie. fully focusing) on you before rewarding.

On the note of training, you mentioned that currently you are using bits of kibble for rewards. This is great but it's also nice to use some 'higher value' treats every once in awhile. Not only does it allow you to mix things up, but it makes it easier to 'Jack pot' the good behaviors. Jack potting is the practice of giving an increased amount of really desirable treats (2 or 3 for example) when your dog does a behavior perfectly. This greatly increases your ability to pinpoint the 'good' in your dog's mind and therefore increases the probability that they will repeate that behavior. Toys and play can also be used as a reward.

second, she chews. luckily it is just fabrics or paper-like things (dont have to worry about cleaning products or bathroom stuff). sadly this includes any types of cardboard (like boxes) papaer (reciepts, the mail, BOOKS too), ALL articles of clothing: socks, undies, jeans, jackets, towels, sheets, blankets, and... the couch...
Your first step would be to puppy proof the home. With the exception of big items such as the couch, keep chewable things out of the dogs reach. Put cloths away, books and paper high enough up that it's out of her reach, etc.

Secondly, when you DO catch her chewing, redirect the behavior. Take away whatever it is she was chewing and replace it with an appropriate toy that she is allowed to gnaw on. Then praise her for using that toy instead. It doesn't have to be a big deal where she is disciplined or taught Blankets = Bad for example, you just need to make it more worthwhile for the dog to chew and play with her own toys. In doing so the behavior should start to eliminate itself.

we cannot really afford to take her to obedience classes, so please keep that in mind when responding. we've also tried crate training, went and bought one, set it up, tried coaxing her in, didnt work, then i forcably put her in and she was shaking and just completely terrified, and i cannot do that to the dog. she spent her entire life up until now in a cage and i just cannot continue to do that to her. so after 2 days, i brought the cage back to the store and used the return money to buy her more chew toys.
This is another case of not giving the situation enough time to really take effect. I understand you don't want to traumatize or subject your puppy to something that scares her, but crate training takes some getting used to. For one thing, you need to make the first visits into the crate (I know you returned it but like Natalie, strongly encourage crate training. It's an asset for most dogs and does wonders in the future should you ever need to contain her) happy experiences. Lots of treats while in the crate, lots of toys, lots of praise. Take away the 'scary' aspect of being in the crate and turn it into something special. Sometimes it helps to use either a special treat that she only gets in-crate, or something highly desirable.

Another important note is that things need to be taken slow. A few moments in the crate at first, and then she gets to come out. Again, lots of praise and attention for that time in the crate. Once she gets better used to being in their for those short (stressing short in the beginning, like only a minute or two) periods in the crate you can begin to increase the time spent until she is comfortably contained for however long it is you need her in there.

If you absolutely do you want to crate train though, I suggest something like an ex-pen.
EX. http://www.petco.com/product/13904/Midwest-Black-E-Coat-Exercise-Pens.aspx?CoreCat=OnSiteSearch
That way you can still keep your dog contained without limiting her quite so much in space. Ultimately you need to find a way of containing her at night at least as it seems she can't currently be trusted with free unsupervised roam of the house. You can also try puppy proofing one room of the house and locking her in there instead.

i've been trying the rewards system, giving her a "treat" (actually just a single piece of dry food) when she does anything good, as telling her "no, stop, bad" has absolutely no effect, but her behavior still is not improving.
Again remember that it's going to take some time. You've had her for only 4 full days now. Training is going to take a bit longer then that.

Hope some of this helps. There are a lot of knowledgeable people here and a lot of good information. I hope you stick around and find all the advice you need.

Once more, welcome to the forums!
 

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I know you said that you can't really afford training lessons but, that is by far the best investment you can make. As you noted in all your research you're jumping into the middle or the end of a process and you need the basics. Problem is...the basics cover weeks and weeks of knowledge, exercises and practice.

But, OK....lesson one: All training starts with getting the dogs Attention...there are many exercises that classes teach on how to that....here's one of them.

Toss treats. No commands/no talking...just throw treats. At first she might not even be looking you but, the goal is for her to start paying attention to you/looking at you and, she will. You'll start to notice she'll be watching you...now, raise the bar and only throw a treat when she's making eye contact. That's the first breakthrough...eye contact.

She should also start moving closer to you (good things are coming from you!)....that's the second breakthrough and now, you don't toss the treats....she has to come close enough to take them from your hand (third breakthrough).

Now that you've got the attention, you can move on....getting her to do something more than just looking at you/being close to you. Start teaching a Sit for the treat and praise or, a Down (whichever is easier for her).

Next step...moving with you when you move...becoming a team/building a partnership. Start walking....if she follows/comes with you treat and praise profusely.

These are all designed to build a relationship...to build trust/build confidence in each other.

There are many more steps here but, those are the basics to get you started.

Now, the hard part, when to correct and when not to correct...or, more accurately, when to reward and when not to reward. Chewing something they shouldn't often brings huge amounts of attention from distraught owners....they inadvertantly reward the dog with lots of attention (even if it's yelling and screaming...it's still attention). Problem is that's not earned attention and should never be 'rewarded'.

Check out the NILF (Nothing In Life Is Free) sticky at the top of these forums for more examples of this concept.

Last item...and, it ties into the NILF....you reward (quiet praise/treats) for calm behavior. When she's laying, sitting or even standing quietly, you reward it..... you'll get more and more of that calm behavior from her.
 

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This is more of an expectation problem, than it is behavioral problems. You got a young, energetic dog, less than a week ago, and you are expecting an awful lot from her. You definitely didn't give the crate enough time. She's probably had no prior training and, at her age, she will require more time and patience than a brand new pup.

Nothing you've described sounds the least bit out of the ordinary. She hasn't even had enough time to adjust to her new home. The fact that she's taken to house training so quickly indicates that she is well worth any effort you will put into her. Make no mistake, however, that a year old dog is not a Sea Monkey--i.e., "Just add water".

You can get some worthwhile training books from your public library, or a used-book store. Check ebay, too.
 

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For name recognition, say her name and then give her a treat. Do this about 20 times in a row twice a day for a couple of days. Use really small, moist treats, cut up hot dog works really well. Treats should be pea size, no bigger.

For the chewing, get bitter apple or a similar spray. You will still need to do the training, but this will help save your big stuff in the mean time. You can spray the couch and other non pickable items with it and they will taste bad. Some dogs like the taste (most don't), if she does, there are different sprays. I also wouldn't leave all her toys out all of the time. Leave 3-4 out and rotate them every day or two. That way she has "new" toys every day or two and they will become more interesting to her.

When she goes all crazy in the house what is she doing that is bothersome? Is she nipping you? Or is it just the running around?

I would work on rev up/cool down and "Its Yer Choice" with her. These will help her learn some self control which will help in many other areas. It will also help her learn to stop playing, instead of becoming and "unholy terror":)

Since you know when she is most likely to go all crazy on you, be prepared. Get a few kongs, stuff them with yummy foods and freeze them. Its helpful to have 2 or 3 so there is always one ready. When you get back from a walk, get out a kong and give her that to chew on. When you are playing, get one out and when you stop playing, give her a kong to chew on. I like to put part of my dogs meals into the kongs, with some peanut butter and plain yogurt and some other goodies (a few treats).

Teach her how to do a few commands and make her work for everything. That is an easy, non confrontational way to establish that you control resources and she needs to behave to get what she wants.

It also sounds like she could use a little bit more exercise.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
ok, thank you all for the many responses. i'll try to be more patient with her. for the most part she is ok, it is just those few peak hours when she's so bad that i almost cry lol. and at night, when my dad and i sleep, she comes to bed and sleeps too. she's a perfect little angel overnight.

ill give the treat tossing thing a try, see how it goes. i think we're already at stage 2 of that, maybe further. she DOES always watch me and she makes eye contact most of the time. she also follows me around the house.

i have put all objects i am aware of out of her reach, but she seems to keep finding things (shirts or socks that i havent seen in years lol).

but yes, she has great potential, its just a matter of getting over the initial hurdle that's got me down.

also: about treats. i've been using the regular kibble for a few reasons, first of which the few treats ive tried have upset her stomach and caused her to vomit. i'm trying to give her a few days to let her tummy settle before trying different flavors and brands of treats. secondly, the vet said not to give her very many treats in a day, only about 10 percent of her total intake. so what should i do? training is going to use a LOT more treats than 10 percent of what she eats for the day, or should it not take more? im not sure. maybe less regular food so theres more room for treats?

whats most bothersome is the chewing and nipping and barking. she chews something she isnt supposed to, i put one of her toys in front of her, wiggle it, squeak it, etc. she ignores the toy and goes right for my hand and makes me bleed. and she WONT let go no matter what we say or do. when i finnally do manage to pry her deadlocked jaws from my mutilated hand, she barks, and only stops if we give her a hand to chew on, or ignore her for 30+ minutes.

and i REALLY do not want to give her people food EVER. we had to put *my baby* down recently because she had old age illnesses that were exponentially worsened by her being overweight. that is moreso my dad's fault than my own, as he can never deny the animal something it wants (i.e. people food). but dusty doesnt seem to know yet that people food is any different than dog food. she doesnt show much interest in it when we eat, so my dad doesnt feel preassured to give her any table scraps. and i'd kinda like to keep it this way lol
 

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They will only beg at the table if they are fed from the table. Giving her people food as training treats will not result in her begging, nor in her being overweight provided you don't over do the treats. Keeping treats very tiny is what makes people able to give so many for training. What every kind of treats you use, just make them very small. Pea size or smaller.

When she bites onto your hands, literally yelp! or yell OUCH! (not in an angry voice though) and stand up and leave the room for a few minutes. That works on a lot of dogs. Another thing you can do is actually spray bitter apple onto your hands, but then they will smell and taste like bitter apple for awhile . . . its not to pleasant.
 

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Lots of good advice here...I wanted to address one other thing:

Googling humping got you the wrong answer. Lots of misinformation on the internet. Humping, ESPECIALLY an INANIMATE object is not about dominance. She's trying to dominate the cushion? LOL. Humping in dogs is most often about overexcitement and overstimulation..a buildup of energy/excitement or anxiety in the dog can result in a lot of behaviours including but not limited to humping, chewing, barking, digging, zoomies and biting.
True dominance MOUNTING is a totally different ball of wax.

Give your girl time to settle in. Puppy proof as much as possible. Restrict her freedom in the house as much as possible. Use baby gates, close doors etc so that she is closeby and supervised as much as you can. Rethink the crate/xpen thing for when you DO have the money and play crate games with her to make it a fun place. Save the "good rewards" for the trade game..so that when you are wanting to get something from her it is WORTHWHILE To her to give it to you instead of biting you. Yes, this means sometimes using people food, all good things in moderation kiddo. Treats no larger than the pinky fingernail. Keep some diced up chicken breast or hot dog around for these events.

My sympathies to you on the loss of your previous dog. Do remember though, that this new dog is NOT the same individual as your old dog. She hasn't had the benefit of a long period of time with you, nor of the calming properties of being an adult. If you had your previous dog as a puppy it is very likely she/he was a pain as a puppy too...we tend to forget that after our dogs grow up and act like adults..lol.
 

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for treats you can use hotdogs.. the really cheap ones. They are way less money than store bought dog treats and you can get 60 treats from a single hot dog. Quarter it lengthwise and then make cross cuts. Treats should be no more than 1/2 dime size. It isn't quantity that counts. It is quality.

I train my dog with tiny bits of cooked shoulder steak, cooked liver, cooked chicken breast and string chease bits. She is not fat. Vet says she is perfect weight.

You can get training advice from www.clikcertraining.com and from the stickies at the top of this forum. I do recommend you purchase a clicker.. less than $2 at Petsmart.. and learn how to use it. You can use it to teach your dog her name along with everything else you want her to do.

Too bad you got rid of the crate. You have had this dog for less than a week and you need to lower your expectations and raise the level of the training work you do with her. You also should get her out and walk her.. as much as you can. If you walk her for an hour and a half, you may find a lot of the craziness will settle down. Tired dog = good dog.
 

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When i adopted an adult doberman pinscher a few years ago, the first few weeks were really hard. He came with a few bad habits and he took so much work that there were more than a few times that i thought about giving him back to the rescue. But it gets easier!

One thing i wanted to mention is to make sure your dog is getting enough exercise. I know you said you play with him in the yard every day, but the fact that he's coming back inside more hyper than before makes me think he isn't getting sufficiently worn out. We wear out our mutt, Emo, by taking him on a bike ride. (we ride the bike, Emo runs beside it). It works great! When we get back home he's too tired to move!

If treats are giving him an upset stomach, i think you're smart to stick w/kibble for now.

I agree with some of the previous statements that SOME "people food" is okay for dogs. Mine eat boiled chicken, boiled hamburger, rice, veggies, boiled eggs and occasionally cooked chicken liver or pork. People food doesn't make dogs fat, over eating does. I have a hunch that a varied diet is more healthy, but your dog will probably be fine on dog food if that's what you choose.

Hang in there! You're doing great and Dusty will settle in soon enough!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
well, i've started using a lot of the training methods suggested, and she's doing A LOT better today than she was yesterday.

as for outside and playtime, during daylight hours i stay outside with her as long as she wants to, i throw a frisbee (spelling) and she chases it, picks it up, comes to me and plays tug until i win and can throw it again. i also have a ball but she likes the frisbee more. sometimes we stay out for almost 2 hours, and other times its just 10-20 mins. when she wants to go home she walks over to the gate to exit and sits there.

i've figured out that the actual trigger of her crazy behavior is when we take her harness off. if we leave it on her when we come inside she stays calm, but soon as we go to take it off she whacks out. i would just leave it on her, but if its on for too long inside she starts chewing at it and gets her bottom jaw stuck in the front. but we just got back from a short walk now, and she's being a good girl.

i've also started using a water spray bottle to squirt her when she's chewing the couch. works BEAUTIFULLY.

and yea, ive stopped trying to expect from her what i expected of gutchy. we had a strong connection and understanding and really great communication. but thats the kind of thing that takes years to develop. i've been meaning to post about her in the memorial thread, but every time i start to i just break down and cry. i'll get around to it eventually.

thank you all again for all the great input.
 

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Now that you've made the proper attitude adjustment, the fun begins. She sounds like a great dog who just needs some guidance. A lot of great dogs get given up because they act like dogs. Like a wiseguy friend of mine says: "All those well adjusted, naturally obedient, calm dogs give the other 99.99% a bad name".

Until you've had enough time to develop a genuine bond (that doesn't happen overnight either), be careful about letting her off leash. As bad as her previous owners might have been, she may still run off looking for them.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
well it's been almost a year since i started this thread. i do love the dog very much, and she does understand somewhat that i am the pack leader. i can let her off the leash and she will come to me immediately when called. however, she is still a nightmare in most other aspects. she pulls on the leash, and ive tried just about everything, and even the vet said, the dog thinks she is the boss. lol if anybody has any tips on leash training her, please share them

i just recently got a new puppy so she has a companion, and he is still to young to leave the house, but when he is old enough, i plan to walk them both at the same time, but that will be impossible if she keeps up with this pulling. she is a boxer greyhound mix, and she is VERY strong.
 

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definitely, then, since you are in exactly the same place i was a few months ago, you want to start looking into the Dog Whisperer, Cesar Millan.

do NOT go checking up on reviews - read his book "Cesar's Way", watch the show with an open mind, and make your own evaluation. over and over, i read how he's "cruel" and "aggressive" and i believe it for the longest time. once i opened my mind and made my own judgement, however, i found him to be the epitome of zen-like calm and warm concern. quite frankly there are many many times on the show where he dealt with a viciously attacking dog by just holding him down where i, myself, woulda clocked the little bugger into the middle of next week!

his website is full of primo information - do NOT rely on the show alone, it's NOT GOOD for training purposes. it's value comes when you've read the theories and now you get to see them in practice.

it's been a few months - i honestly can't tell you how long because it only feels like a couple of months to me - and my dog is a *****million**** times better than he was. considering he weighs 70lbs and i have a 3yr old that was becoming his target of choice, you can see the potential for something really ugly happening.

he's 18mo old now and when i go home, even though i've left hamburger thawing on the counter within easy reach, it will still be there when i get home (except maybe the cats might've nibbled on it - they'll give it a go if they can catch dandy sleeping, otherwise he won't let them). my garbage - a shopping bag hanging off a drawer knob - won't be shredded and spreaded. the livingroom furniture will be intact. my daughter's toys and shoes won't be in little bits of fluff and stuff all floating in the air. there won't be any poop or pee in the house. he won't jump on me when i come in the door and he won't bolt out just because the door's open.

in short, i highly, highly recommend cesar for your wayward dog.

for your new puppy, however, check out Tamar Geller's "The Loved Dog" - it's a very sweet, kind technique that works well for dogs that haven't already developed serious issues.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
um i am quite familiar with caesar and his methods and i'd have to agree with the opposition in that he is cruel. he breaks the animals personalities. i do not want my dog to not be herself. i just want her to be a little more gentle.
 

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excuse me, my dog's personality is NOT "broken". furthermore, are you saying that nicolas cage, will and jada pinkett - smith, oprah, vin diesel, kathy griffith, daisy fuentes, ashlee simpson, and many many other highly successful, highly *rich* ppl who could have anyone in the WORLD training their dogs don't know as much as you?

results speak - my dog IS much better and his personality is just as warm and loving as it was before, just now he doesn't try to jump and claw all over my and my toddler's face, doesn't snatch food from her hand or mouth, doesn't slam her to the ground, doesn't snap at her face, etc.

are you sure you're not thinking about brad pattison, the dogfather? go watch At The End of My Leash a few times and then talk to me about "cruel".
 

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if you have nothing constructive to offer i ask that you please not reply to my thread. i appreciate the initial suggestion, but it is not something that i am comfortable with. i am entitled to my own opinion, and you are wrong to try to start an argument with me here just because i disagree with your suggested method. my dog does not go potty all over the house, she does not steal food, she does not destroy furniture. she is just hyper active and gets very excited when outside and as i have already stated, i just want her to be a little more gentle when on the leash.

the "nightmare" i was referring to was the hyperactivity and over-excitement. but that is who she is, and i love her just like that. i do not want a calm dog who is going to just lay on the floor and "behave". i want her to be her playful, crazy self, just without the pulling on the leash. her snatching my socks from the bed when i am getting dressed is one of the highlights of my day. it is part of our routine, the way we play. she runs around a bit, and i ask her "whatcha got? you shouldnt got that". but when i say in my serious voice "give me the sock" she comes over and drops it in my hand. caesar would say that is unacceptable behavior, and maybe it is, but i LIKE her like that.
 

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If the OP does not like Cesar's methods then don't push them. He does a lot of things I disagree with as well. Plus, his show says "do not try this at home without the help of a professional" at the beginning and middle of each episode lol. If you are able to follow his methods correctly to train your own dogs that's one thing, but pushing it on others when they say "no" is another.
 
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