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What do you mean by low maintenance? The coat, the exercise, the personality, human interaction? It depends on what area you mean. :)

Edit: I found this article: Low Maintenance Dog Breeds

Please ignore the suggestion at the end to visit a pet store or breeding farm. :mad:
 

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Having had many different types of dogs, I can say nothing has been easier for me than sighthounds (except Basenjis, they are a whole different creature LOL). But to me easy means: naturally well mannered, calm, clean/doesn't like dirt or mud, doesn't bark, low grooming, and needs little exercise.

I find the traditional "easy" breeds like Goldens and Labs, though I love them, to be a lot more work since they have so much energy and are so "busy" and also are so messy (dripping water after they drink, shedding, tracking in mud, rolling in dirt, etc).

It really does depend.
 

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What do you mean by low maintenance? The coat, the exercise, the personality, human interaction? It depends on what area you mean. :)

Edit: I found this article: Low Maintenance Dog Breeds
I was enjoying this article until I got to the end where it suggested you visit serveral pet stores and breeding farms to check out the dogs :eek:
 

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:eek: I didn't see that! Please ignore that part! LOL I'll see if I can find another one. Thanks!

Here's a good one. And they mention greyhounds, which I'm always thrilled to suggest! And they suggest fostering and rescuing an adult dog... MUCH better than suggesting a pet store or puppy mill!!

If you're looking for a low maintenance dog breed, ask yourself...do you really want a dog?
 

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I have a Toy Manchester Terrier and she is very low maintenance, she wants to be fed, played with and talked to and that is about it. She rarely sheds and when she does it is like little eye lashes, she is Black and Tan, she is very smart and eager to please. There are only a few breeders in the states so it is diffcult to find one but I would highly recomend the breed. She is only 9.5 pounds.
 

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I think that it can depend NEARLY as much on the individual dog as the breed. Mal and Rittie are both very easy dogs to live with, with moderate energy levels and very little grooming needed (They do both shed.) Kaylee (niece and half-sister) though, is a MUCH more active dog.
 

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"..if you don't have that much time for daily walks, then adopt a beagle, :eek:Great Dane, or dachshund, :eek:as these breeds don't require as much physical activity as dogs such as more active dogs."

Dunno where they got their info from but if you get any of these and expect to not have to take long daily walks you will quickly find you have made a BIG mistake.
 

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I really think it depends on the individual dog as well. Willow and Bandit are both rescues, both close to the same age, and both Husky/Shepherd mixes. But, they couldn't be more different!

Willow absolutely LIVES to run and gets depressed if we miss her daily hike, jog, or scooter trip. She's driven, independent, and some would say "stubborn". :) She's reactive, easily aroused, and "in your face" around other dogs. Bandit, on the other hand, is super mellow, lives to please, is super polite with other dogs AND cats, and if you take him for just a short walk, he's content to spend the rest of the day conked out on the couch.

So, I'd say that the best thing to do is find the requirements you're looking for in a dog, and then visit a local shelter and just browse around, asking the shelter staff if they know of any dogs that might fit your needs.
 

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I don't mean to sound rude, but if this is question is based on your desire to own a dog without the hassles associated w/ it; your best bet is a stuffed animal.

Dogs are work, ALL dogs are work. No exceptions.
 

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"..if you don't have that much time for daily walks, then adopt a beagle, :eek:Great Dane, or dachshund, :eek:as these breeds don't require as much physical activity as dogs such as more active dogs."

Dunno where they got their info from but if you get any of these and expect to not have to take long daily walks you will quickly find you have made a BIG mistake.
Yeah, the article also cited Border Collies. I suppose they are trainable, which was their point, but I just don't see how anyone could put 'Border Collie' and 'Low Maintenance' in the same sentence, regardless of context.
 

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i dont think there is such a thing as a low maintenance breed.

i have found that if its not one thing with a specific breed, its another..

like Roseanne Rosannadanna said, "Don't you know, it's always something!"
 

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i dont think there is such a thing as a low maintenance breed.

i have found that if its not one thing with a specific breed, its another.
Thing is, 'maintenance' means different things to different people (as it's been already pointed out here). For me, I LOVE grooming so a longhaired breed would not be a problem to me. Other people may find that a chore. Then you have different energy levels... some people love to run and hike all the time with their dog, and others just prefer walks or light play... it's actually more of a complex question than many people think!

But there is usually a dog breed that suits everyone, I find. The trick is finding the one that's right for you. =)
 

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Greyhounds are pretty low maintenance once they outgrow the puppy stage...around 3-4. My first greyhound honestly isn't much different than a stuffed animal. I love her to bits, but I honestly expect moss to grow on her she is so inactive.
 

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My Whippet is going to start growing moss too! LOL that is such a funny description. My Borzoi and Salukis were lazy bums also. Sighthounds rule... to me low maintenance means: clean and avoids dirt and mud, no barking, lazy, quiet, no slobber or mess, not throwing toys in your face, not running around the house, not knocking things over, etc. Every sighthound I have ever lived with, except the basenji, met all of these. The basenji was clean... but active.
 

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My Whippet is going to start growing moss too! LOL that is such a funny description. My Borzoi and Salukis were lazy bums also. Sighthounds rule... to me low maintenance means: clean and avoids dirt and mud, no barking, lazy, quiet, no slobber or mess, not throwing toys in your face, not running around the house, not knocking things over, etc. Every sighthound I have ever lived with, except the basenji, met all of these. The basenji was clean... but active.
yep...I agree. Regarding the basenji...there are those who would argue they aren't true sighthounds. Hence the seemingly different temperament than the more traditional sighthounds.
 

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I don't mean to sound rude, but if this is question is based on your desire to own a dog without the hassles associated w/ it; your best bet is a stuffed animal.

Dogs are work, ALL dogs are work. No exceptions.
I agree. I'll add, though, that doing the hard work can be a rewarding part of the relationship. Often, if I'm in a stressed out mood or feeling lazy but I know it's the evening and I haven't taken Chance for her daily walk yet, the walk will re-energize me and it will bring joy to me to see how happy something as simple as walking down the street makes her. Or one more example: She has a Spaniel coat that needs consistent brushing but brushing her is fun: Sometimes when I get to her back, she'll turn around and try to bite the brush. Other times, when I get a big clump of fur, she'll want to grab the fur with her mouth, almost as if she's demanding, "Give me my fur back!"

Think of it this way: Going to college wouldn't have been the same experience if they gave the diploma on day 1 without doing any work. Anything that's worthwhile is worth working for.
 

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I don't mean to sound rude, but if this is question is based on your desire to own a dog without the hassles associated w/ it; your best bet is a stuffed animal.

Dogs are work, ALL dogs are work. No exceptions.

Either that, or a cat. Scoop the poop, fill the bowl, sprinkle some nip...the cat comes to you when it wants affection. Easy.

I know many will differ on this, I think SChell will probably produce about 50 articles of facts to prove me wrong -

but, my experience has been so EASY with my English Bulldog. I swear its like owning a stinky pillow. A pillow that wants to eat, sleep, and fart.
 

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Either that, or a cat. Scoop the poop, fill the bowl, sprinkle some nip...the cat comes to you when it wants affection. Easy.

I know many will differ on this, I think SChell will probably produce about 50 articles of facts to prove me wrong -

but, my experience has been so EASY with my English Bulldog. I swear its like owning a stinky pillow. A pillow that wants to eat, sleep, and fart.
Well I get the point that owning your dog has been easy but don't think I understand the stinky pillow reference! Is that a common metaphor that I'm simply unfamiliar with?
 

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LOL! That was cute.

What does a pillow do? Lies on your bed/couch all day/night. And he stinks. I don't know why. I groom him, but bulldogs are very gassy....he's just real lazy, very little exercise required, you dig me?

My other two (lab mix, border collie mix) are not easy. I only got lucky on the stinky pillow.
 
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