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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
My attitude is that cats are holy and not to be messed with under any circumstances. Dogs don't play with cats, they ignore them. Or else. Like puppy biting and chewing on hands, it takes months to instill that attitude, and it's harder with the kinds of dog you're interested in as they tend to have high prey drive.

I'm not sure what I'd do with a cat with problems such as you describe; it would really up the potential danger to the cat. I think I'd wait until the cat has passed on to get another dog, but obviously you have reasons for wanting another dog sooner. I think I might come up with a totally enclosed cat habitat or something like that. The problem there is you have to have all humans in the household willing and able to be careful about keeping doors closed.


I know of people who have had a similar experience with big dog/small dog in same household, and like you I've lost a cat to a dog, although in my case it was a dog that came to me as an adult to foster. What happened was absolutely my fault for not being careful enough, and I will never get over the guilt.

My last cat died before I got either of my current dogs, and while I miss having cats, it makes life much easier to not have to worry about them with large dogs that have high prey drive in the house.
currently we already close doors when the two indoor cats are in a room unless they are supervised, we have a cat room that they get locked in too when we can’t supervise them. I am now looking at dogs who are apparently good with animals they have grown up with and we probably will be able to only let them together when supervised.
I have a Puli. He’s not vocal, intimidating, nor protective
Thank you! how much work would you say the cords are? I think pulis are to small for what I want, but Komondor might fit.
 

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Thank you! how much work would you say the cords are? I think pulis are to small for what I want, but Komondor might fit.
He just turned 1 about 2-3 weeks ago, so he is at the stage (and has been since 7 months old or so) that we are woking on him in 20 minute sessions, twice a day, probably every 2-3 days....

20 minutes at a time so he doesn’t get bored/upset but also because your hands hurt after awhile.

Long story short, cord maintenance and development is a LOT of work. He’s extremely smart though, but also playful (he is 1 after all) and likes to pounce on the other dogs. Also a natural herding dog, so would probably torment a cat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
He just turned 1 about 2-3 weeks ago, so he is at the stage (and has been since 7 months old or so) that we are woking on him in 20 minute sessions, twice a day, probably every 2-3 days....

20 minutes at a time so he doesn’t get bored/upset but also because your hands hurt after awhile.

Long story short, cord maintenance and development is a LOT of work. He’s extremely smart though, but also playful (he is 1 after all) and likes to pounce on the other dogs. Also a natural herding dog, so would probably torment a cat.
Thank you! I was reading thinking thats not a lot of work 🤣
 

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Thank you! I was reading thinking thats not a lot of work 🤣
I will say. I don’t know what the future will hold, as he’s our first Puli, but it does seem to be getting a LOT easier as they form since you have something to grab onto easily. When you start off, it’s pretty hard to get down to the skin.

You can’t tell very well from pictures, but the cords are definitely coming in...... Problem is, get lazy/careless and they get fleas, matted, skin conditions mold (yes) then you are looking at a full shave-down, and a fully corded Puli takes about 3 years......

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If you want a vocal dog that might dissuade intruders, go with a herder. They are generally quite vocal and will alert you to anything weird happenings on your property. Many are aloof with strangers and will give them a bit of a side eye while looking intimidating, but they aren't going to attack. Some can be dog selective, but many get along just fine with other dogs depending on the breed. Most are fine with other animals once introduced, as well, because farmers didn't want their herding dogs killing their chickens and cats and other small livestock. A good breeder will have introduced the puppies to cats and livestock, too.

One thing I suggest with getting herding breeds is making absolutely sure you are going with a reputable breeder. That "wary of or aloof with strangers" trait that is desired can become "genetically programed to be afraid of strangers and act defensively". You don't want that. 90% of the strangers that come on your property are service people, your guests, or the friendly neighbor from a mile down the road who wants to stop in to say hello.

When people ask me about a "protective" dog, I generally just tell them to go get a security system set up in your house if you're worried about it. Dogs that will actually attack a human are a liability and not for the average person. Well trained protection dogs are the price of a small SUV. Even a vocal herding dog can be won over with some tasty treats or taken out entirely with a bullet if someone really wants to get in your house.

Set up security cameras in plain site, which are inexpensive online. Get one of those "protected by such and such security company" signs and put it in your yard. Get those little magnet things you put on windows and doors that will sound an alarm if tripped. Deadbolt your doors. Plant thorny rose bushes under your windows. Those things are going to be more effective than the dog, because most burglars know how to get past them by now...
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
I will say. I don’t know what the future will hold, as he’s our first Puli, but it does seem to be getting a LOT easier as they form since you have something to grab onto easily. When you start off, it’s pretty hard to get down to the skin.

You can’t tell very well from pictures, but the cords are definitely coming in...... Problem is, get lazy/careless and they get fleas, matted, skin conditions mold (yes) then you are looking at a full shave-down, and a fully corded Puli takes about 3 years......

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He is adorable :love:
 

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The working line German Shepherd I currently have would meet all of your criteria. He is highly trained. He is friends with the senior female German Shepherd. He is friends with the blind cat (male, neutered). He is a bit afraid of the female cat.. but they play a game and she chases him which he invites. He is confident. He is intelligent. He is very very clear.

I had a friend staying here some weekends while building a house. This friend would arrive at night. I knew this and crated this dog next to my bed on those nights. When the key hit the door (11PM.. which is well past bed time here) he would growl. Then he would listen. When the first step was taken to come upstairs he EXPLODED in that crate. The first time he refused to settle until lights came on and he could see the person and my acceptance of that person. After thst, while the routine was the same a word from me and he would settle. He was 2 coming 3 at the time. At the time I did not think he would actually bite.

Another year went by.. and at 3 coming 4 something has changed. Maturity and being serious emerged. He started to "like" being "tingly." I no longer doubt he would bite an intruder. I manage him when anyone enters the property. This is this well bred individual dog. He is intact (I do not neuter male dogs unless they need to be for medical reasons).

I will add that he is highly trained. This has taken all his years from 8 weeks old to now to accomplish and is on going. My dog's breeder consistently produces dogs like the one I have.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
The working line German Shepherd I currently have would meet all of your criteria. He is highly trained. He is friends with the senior female German Shepherd. He is friends with the blind cat (male, neutered). He is a bit afraid of the female cat.. but they play a game and she chases him which he invites. He is confident. He is intelligent. He is very very clear.

I had a friend staying here some weekends while building a house. This friend would arrive at night. I knew this and crated this dog next to my bed on those nights. When the key hit the door (11PM.. which is well past bed time here) he would growl. Then he would listen. When the first step was taken to come upstairs he EXPLODED in that crate. The first time he refused to settle until lights came on and he could see the person and my acceptance of that person. After thst, while the routine was the same a word from me and he would settle. He was 2 coming 3 at the time. At the time I did not think he would actually bite.

Another year went by.. and at 3 coming 4 something has changed. Maturity and being serious emerged. He started to "like" being "tingly." I no longer doubt he would bite an intruder. I manage him when anyone enters the property. This is this well bred individual dog. He is intact (I do not neuter male dogs unless they need to be for medical reasons).

I will add that he is highly trained. This has taken all his years from 8 weeks old to now to accomplish and is on going. My dog's breeder consistently produces dogs like the one I have.
Thank you!
 

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I have a large pitbull (she'll be about 90 lbs full size) and she's very good with dogs, cats and is a great guard dog. She likes cold weather

Get a pitbull from a good bloodline - watch this video
But be careful. They are apparently impossible to potty train.
 

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A 90lb dog - especially a female - isn't an American Pit Bull terrier. A true, game-bred APBT is probably the opposite of what someone's looking for if they want a dog who is wary/protective against people but gets along well with cats and doesn't mind other dogs - they tend to be extremely human friendly but have high prey drive and are often on the spectrum between dog selective and outright dog aggressive. They do look intimidating, but aren't going to be a great choice for this situation due to this. Some bully breed mixes might do well, but that's going to be an individual dog thing more than a breed thing. There may also be American Bully lines that will fit the bill, but there's a huge variety within the 'American Bully' type, and I don't have the experience to speak to what to look for in that case.

I agree with many of the posters saying you'll be best looking for an intimidating dog who will alert bark at strangers rather than a dog who will be inclined to actively engage. A trained protection dog is even legally considered a weapon in some areas, and that can mean more serious consequences for you and/or the dog should they actually injure someone. Whatever breed you choose, make sure to get familiar with the individual lines and dogs any breeder you're interested in is using, as some may be better suited for your needs than others.
 

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I have a large pitbull (she'll be about 90 lbs full size) and she's very good with dogs, cats and is a great guard dog. She likes cold weather

Get a pitbull from a good bloodline - watch this video
You apparently didn’t het a good bloodline, because your dog is about 40lbs overweight for breed standard......


Sounds like you got an “XXL” ‘Champion’ whatever the shady breeders are calling their Pit Bull mixes.

What does the AKC papers say your dog is? There are four breeds that encompass the generic “Pit Bull” term


Edit: Awe crap. This is what I get for not reading all the responses before posting...... already pointed out more eloquently than I attempted!
 

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You apparently didn’t het a good bloodline, because your dog is about 40lbs overweight for breed standard......


Sounds like you got an “XXL” ‘Champion’ whatever the shady breeders are calling their Pit Bull mixes.

What does the AKC papers say your dog is? There are four breeds that encompass the generic “Pit Bull” term


Edit: Awe crap. This is what I get for not reading all the responses before posting...... already pointed out more eloquently than I attempted!

She's a real big American Staffy, not a classic american pitbull terrier. Google American staffy, that's exactly how she looks

She loves all other animals but seems to be a great guard dog. Everytime there's strangers knocking on the door, she goes totally crazy. Has a ferocious, very intimidating bark. On the street, she's super super friendly to all people and animals

I never trained her to be a guard dog. A classic APBT would not be a good choice but I think American staffies are perfect for this situation
 

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90lbs is still much larger than the AmStaff standard calls for, especially for a female. She wouldn't happen to be a lab mix, would she?
sorry I should have elaborated. She's 60 lbs now - I think will be 80-90 LBs by the time she's 3-4

I need to do a DNA test but she looks identical to this


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her personality is hardcore american staffy
 

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I should note - I think the online articles on american staffies are inaccurate. Almost every Amstaff I know is 60-90 lbs. They are not 40-50 lb dogs. That's either an APBT or a mixed American staffy.
 

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I should note - I think the online articles on american staffies are inaccurate. Almost every Amstaff I know is 60-90 lbs. They are not 40-50 lb dogs. That's either an APBT or a mixed American staffy.
It’s not “online articles” it’s the AKC breed standard.......

You wouldn’t need a DNA test for your dog if you purchased it from a reputable breeder, and had papers for it. You should know the entire lineage with registered names.
 

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It’s not “online articles” it’s the AKC breed standard.......

You wouldn’t need a DNA test for your dog if you purchased it from a reputable breeder, and had papers for it. You should know the entire lineage with registered names.

ahhh I gotcha. I'm a huge pitbull lover so I know all the differences among the subreeds. Every American staffy I meet on the street looks like an easy 70-80 lbs to me
 
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