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Discussion Starter #1
So here's the deal. I am looking into the breeds, and doing my research before I pull the trigger and buy one. I am in no rush, and I am actually doing this sooner than I should (don't expect to have my own place until maybe 2 years). But hey, doesn't really hurt does it?

I am a HUGE dog fan. I have grown up with a chihuahua who although I hate to admit it, wasn't my breed of choice.. but I love that girl so much, and she is awesome. I've narrowed breeds that I am interested in, and would like to own, and then I'll mention my expected living arrangement, and lifestyle and then hopefully you guys can point me in the right direction as to what breed might fit my situation better. Doesn't have to be a 100% match as I would not mind making some changes for the sake of having a dog I truly like.

I should also mention that although I don't have the lease drawn up for a place, doesn't mean it won't happen. Only reason I say 2 years is because I am still in school.

Anyways, I expect to live in an apartment in NYC. Right away that really narrows some breeds down as most apartment's pet weight limit is 50 pounds. While I am an active guy, I'm not much of a "runner" where I'm looking for a running partner in a dog. I exercise mostly at the gym, and play sports. So while I don't mind giving my dog a walk, and taking it to the park, it doesn't really match up with my physical activities so perhaps a dog with a not too crazy energy level might be better? Or even just a dog that more or less adjusts itself to my energy level. I would also prefer them to have a pretty nice long lifespan.. I hate the idea of losing something so special to you after a few single digit years. And I also want a manly, masculine looking dog haha.

As of now, that is all I can think of. I'm sure as the thread keeps going Ill think of a couple more points.

These are the breeds I love:
English Bulldog
Boxer (I know, high energy)
Black lab (I know, high energy again)

Would any of these breeds work for me? Considering I am willing to make some changes? What other breeds based on my criteria would you guys mention?
 

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All of those breeds get to be over 50 pounds (or average right around there). So if they're strict about the weight limit those breeds won't work.

Honestly I can't think of a "manly" breed that's under 50 pounds :p, but I'll think about it some more and look through a breed book. Do you like squashy-faced dogs like Pugs and Boston Terriers? Maybe a French Bulldog?

I'm inclined to recommend a shelter mutt since you don't have a lot of specific preferences. Maybe a Lab mix, an adult so you know it won't get too big.
 

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Puppy or adult?

There are some breeds that are typically higher energy but individual dogs can be lazier. Same with size- some breeds have a wider weight range and if you get one full grown, you know if you're getting a smaller one.

Boston Terrier or French Bulldog came to mind, as did a lower energy Jack Russell (as in, adopting an adult dog known to be more medium energy). Miniature Schnauzer maybe.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'd much rather get a puppy truthfully. I wish I could say adoption worked for me.. but my family tried adopting a 4 yr old golden.. Sweet boy, just didn't work out.

Bostons, and frenchies are cool.. maybe a bit too 'cute' for my taste haha, but worth looking into
 

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All of those breeds get to be over 50 pounds (or average right around there). So if they're strict about the weight limit those breeds won't work.

Honestly I can't think of a "manly" breed that's under 50 pounds :p, but I'll think about it some more and look through a breed book. Do you like squashy-faced dogs like Pugs and Boston Terriers? Maybe a French Bulldog?

I'm inclined to recommend a shelter mutt since you don't have a lot of specific preferences. Maybe a Lab mix, an adult so you know it won't get too big.
I love all dogs. Just so happens that some of my faves have that squashy face lol, so I guess yea, I like them.

I'm sure that if they get to be between 50-60 they wont be able to tell the difference. I'm not sure how strict they are, and heck I might even find a place with little to no weight limit.
 

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Just because adopting an older dog didn't work out once doesn't mean that's what it's always like---I could just as well say "buying a puppy didn't work for me (true story), so I won't ever buy a puppy again". If you go through a good rescu, they can help match you up with the right dog and reduce the chances of a mismatch.

Puppies are always a gamble; if you want to know the dog's personality it's best to get an older dog. And housetraining a small puppy while living in an apartment is hard! Up and down every half hour. . .oy.

Anyway, it's your choice if you want to get a puppy or an older dog (note: shelters sometimes have puppies and breeders sometimes have older dogs), but if you go the breeder route make sure it's a good breeder. I'm sure you don't want to support bad breeding practices by buying from a pet store or crummy breeder.

Hmm, Norwich or Norfolk terrier, maybe? I still think a rescue mutt is best--the 25-45 pound range is rather underrepresented among purebreds, but it seems like a lot of mutts falls into that range.
 

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Just because adopting an older dog didn't work out once doesn't mean that's what it's always like---I could just as well say "buying a puppy didn't work for me (true story), so I won't ever buy a puppy again". If you go through a good rescu, they can help match you up with the right dog and reduce the chances of a mismatch.

Puppies are always a gamble; if you want to know the dog's personality it's best to get an older dog. And housetraining a small puppy while living in an apartment is hard! Up and down every half hour. . .oy.

Anyway, it's your choice if you want to get a puppy or an older dog (note: shelters sometimes have puppies and breeders sometimes have older dogs), but if you go the breeder route make sure it's a good breeder. I'm sure you don't want to support bad breeding practices by buying from a pet store or crummy breeder.

Hmm, Norwich or Norfolk terrier, maybe? I still think a rescue mutt is best--the 25-45 pound range is rather underrepresented among purebreds, but it seems like a lot of mutts falls into that range.
I see where you are coming from, and I strongly support adoption and rescuing. Personally however, I much prefer the idea of bonding with a dog from when it's a puppy.. training it around my lifestyle, and just be there for it from the beginning. Plus getting an older dog from rescue kinda defeats the purpose of me wanting a long nice life with a dog, since more often than not when adopting an older dog, you've missed a good couple years.
 

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I'm sure that if they get to be between 50-60 they wont be able to tell the difference. I'm not sure how strict they are, and heck I might even find a place with little to no weight limit.
Might depend if you want a male or a female. Male Labs and Boxers can get to be 70+ pounds. Females average smaller. I suppose they wouldn't do anything unless a neighbor complained, but no telling what kind of whiny neighbors you'd end up with.

So, if you could find a place with no size requirements, would you ever have to move in the ~15~ years the dog will be with you?
 

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Might depend if you want a male or a female. Male Labs and Boxers can get to be 70+ pounds. Females average smaller. I suppose they wouldn't do anything unless a neighbor complained, but no telling what kind of whiny neighbors you'd end up with.

So, if you could find a place with no size requirements, would you ever have to move in the ~15~ years the dog will be with you?
Perhaps. And at that point I'd obviously have a responsibility and priority of finding a place that would work for him
 

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I see where you are coming from, and I strongly support adoption and rescuing. Personally however, I much prefer the idea of bonding with a dog from when it's a puppy.. training it around my lifestyle, and just be there for it from the beginning. Plus getting an older dog from rescue kinda defeats the purpose of me wanting a long nice life with a dog, since more often than not when adopting an older dog, you've missed a good couple years.
Your puppy could die tomorrow. Your 3-year-old rescue dog might live another 15 years. No guarantees in life.

Puppy training takes forever, as most dogs don't grow brains for at least a year :p. Especially Labs--they take 2 years! I haven't noticed any difference in bonding or "training around my lifestyle" between getting an adult and getting a puppy, and the adults train much faster and easier. I mean, it's fine if you want a puppy but there are some misconceptions there.
 

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I see where you are coming from, and I strongly support adoption and rescuing. Personally however, I much prefer the idea of bonding with a dog from when it's a puppy.. training it around my lifestyle, and just be there for it from the beginning. Plus getting an older dog from rescue kinda defeats the purpose of me wanting a long nice life with a dog, since more often than not when adopting an older dog, you've missed a good couple years.
"Older" doesn't mean old, it means past the puppy stage and basically full grown. 1 year, 1.5 years old. TONS of dogs end up in shelters between 6 months and 1 year old, often through no real fault of their own but simply because they were impulse buys and people didn't consider how much time dogs take. I've also seen dogs end up in shelter because the owners moved to a "No Pets" apartment....
While a good breeder can help reduce the chances of health problems, there are no guarantees. Boxers for example have a lot of known health problems and their lifespan isn't that long.

One thing to consider is your job. Puppies require frequent potty breaks, and apartment living makes this more difficult to begin with (things like elevators and stairs are a hassle in rushing a little one out to pee), working full time creates a bigger hassle. A young adult dog, even if he needs a potty training refresher course, has the physical ability to hold it for much longer- most adult dogs are fine for a typical workday (8-9 hours max)

Like Willowy says, there isn't anything wrong with a responsible breeder, but there are a lot of benefits to a rescue also.
Don't worry about bonding problems, I've had dogs stay as fosters and get attached to me within a week. Dogs are adaptable and will get close to their owners (within their own personality- some dogs are more "velcro" than others) regardless of whether you get one at 8 weeks or 2 years old.

Try going to some shows and competitions and meeting lots of breeds. Meet dogs at "fun shows" or all breed events and interact with them; most owners love to show off their dogs and gab about their breed of choice (or their rescue dog of unknown breed)
 

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What are you guys' opinion on breeds like pit bulls, and amstaffs? Since you are all big advocates for rescues I'm sure you know that a very high percentage of the dogs that end up here are that kind of breed. I've done some research and have heard both sides of the fence. "It's all how you train them" and "they can be unpredictable, as it is in their genes" and I personally agree with the latter. This kind of holds me back because I love the way those breeds look, but that slight unpredictability, and the fact that pit bulls for example were bred to fit dogs kind of throws me off. I know any dog can be aggressive, but when an owner is irresponsible in not socializing a lab and having it turn out aggressive, and an owner socializing a pit, and one day just starting something with another dog for whatever reason are two different things. What are do you guys think about this?

I know we've kinda detoured from the main point of the thread, bit it's all good lol
 

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Pit bulls are great dogs for the right people. But they can very often be dog aggressive which is something you need to be aware of. If you want a 'dog park going' kind of dog, it's the wrong breed.

Also, even apartments without weight restrictions will ban pit bull type dogs very frequently. I lived in a few apartments during college and my last had no weight limit but wouldn't allow rotties, dobes, GSDs, and pit bulls. Keep this in mind because it will make renting a LOT harder. A lot of insurance companies will not cover pit bulls.

I would check out the average weight limit where you expect to live and go from there. I know in my area staying under 35 lbs made things much easier. There were a couple complexes that allowed up to 65 lbs and then mine which had no weight limit but realize you are really starting to limit yourself when you get a big dog, particularly of a 'dangerous' breed. It is doable, don't get me wrong and I know people that it is very much worth it. But PLEASE think this through, I can't count how many times I've heard the story of 'can't find a place to rent with my pit bull'.
 

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Just jumping in, buth pits can be great apartment dogs if you live in a place that DOES NOT have tons of breed restrictions. Its almost impossible to rent in my town with a pit/boxer/german shepherd/a ton of breeds.

Honestly worth looking into. Ask if apartments/rental companies have a list of restricted breeds. Even if its a private rental straight from owners (my house is) we still can't ahve certain dogs because of the homeowners insurance.

That being said, if they arent restricted I would really look into that option. Pits are awesome dogs.
 

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Pit bulls are great dogs for the right people. But they can very often be dog aggressive which is something you need to be aware of. If you want a 'dog park going' kind of dog, it's the wrong breed.

Also, even apartments without weight restrictions will ban pit bull type dogs very frequently. I lived in a few apartments during college and my last had no weight limit but wouldn't allow rotties, dobes, GSDs, and pit bulls. Keep this in mind because it will make renting a LOT harder. A lot of insurance companies will not cover pit bulls.

I would check out the average weight limit where you expect to live and go from there. I know in my area staying under 35 lbs made things much easier. There were a couple complexes that allowed up to 65 lbs and then mine which had no weight limit but realize you are really starting to limit yourself when you get a big dog, particularly of a 'dangerous' breed. It is doable, don't get me wrong and I know people that it is very much worth it. But PLEASE think this through, I can't count how many times I've heard the story of 'can't find a place to rent with my pit bull'.
I brought that up out of curiosity. Honestly pits aren't on my list of possibilities for a couple reasons, including the ones you mentioned. I was just making a point that it is pretty hard to find a dog that isn't a pit that you like, and fits your preferences. At least in my area.
 

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I brought that up out of curiosity. Honestly pits aren't on my list of possibilities for a couple reasons, including the ones you mentioned. I was just making a point that it is pretty hard to find a dog that isn't a pit that you like, and fits your preferences. At least in my area.
The typical pit bull is way too high energy for what you are looking for. think about 2 hours of activity daily minimum (brisk walking, jogging, hiking, fetch, flirt pole play etc). A typical afternoon for me with my hound dog and a pit foster is (weather permitting) an hour to 2 hour walk at the city park which is very hilly, then after a short break, the dogs play for awhile (which is big energy burner) and then some fetch for the pit in the yard, then each dog can run around on their own in the yard and THEN they are ready to relax for the evening.

But if you found a dog that was being fostered and had a lower-than-typical energy personality, maybe. Unlikely though unless you understated how much you can exercise the dog (because it sounds like you just want to do a basic 30 min walk x2 day which is fine for a lot of dogs but not a lot of pits). The rental thing is also a big issue- the pit bull rescue I foster with gets way too many calls that start with "I'm moving and they don't allow pits" or "I'm moving and there's a breed ban, can you take my pit?" etc.

But they can very often be dog aggressive which is something you need to be aware of. If you want a 'dog park going' kind of dog, it's the wrong breed.
I disagree with the first half of this and agree with the second. "very often dog aggressive" nah, a slightly higher tendency than some other breeds but no where near "very often" and even among those that have dog aggression issues, a lot of them still have their buddies they like and do just fine being leash walked.

But, we do discourage dog parks for the pitties even the ones who LOVE other dogs (which, a ton of them do) because 1)pit bulls play rough- lots of wrestling, very vocal, lots of mouthing- and it can freak out other owners. They flip out that the pit is "attacking" their dog, when he is really just playing. 2)If anything does happen, even when another dog is the aggressor, the pit gets blamed. Not worth the risk.
So we do organized pack walks, encourage play groups with known dogs of compatible energy level, some of them do doggie daycare and other supervised (controlled) activities.
 

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rescue a bully mix. theyre a dime a dozen, comes in a range of sizes depending on what they're mixed with and you just list them as a mix breed because really theres no way to know every kind of dog in that dog

also this sounds like the first dog you will have on your own without anyone else involved

dont get a puppy. puppies are INSANE energy and super needy. like has to go outside every threeish hours, needs intensive socialization and attention and has special needs. Having a puppy is like having a baby. you'll likely have to take time off work or hire a sitter depending on a few things....you'll lose sleep....things will be peed on regularly for the first monthish...there will be chewing and destruction.....unless youre home a lot anyway or rich...an older dog is a better bet for a first dog
 

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If you got an English Bulldog puppy it would be as high maintenance as any other puppy. Zim is right about getting a puppy being comparable to having a baby. Puppies are a full time job if you are going to raise them right.

Adult English Bulldogs need minimum to moderate exercise and care taken to avoid over heating. They have a relatively short lifespan at 8-10 years on average. They also need their folds cleaned daily.
 
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