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Discussion Starter #1
I've been looking for a cavapoo or a cockapoo puppy for a long time now. I'd also love a maltipoo but it would need to be one of the bigger ones bred with a mini instead of a toy. I have been looking on Craigslist but there really aren't any there. The only ones available are the small toy maltipoos (too little, too worried about little kids hurting them).

I know there are breeders, which is a smarter way than looking on Craigslist. But I just cannot in any way afford to spend $3,000 on a dog. I need to spend less than $500.

I am in the Dallas (specifically Garland) TX area. Anybody have any suggestions for my search? Thank you so much!
 

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How about checking your local rescue organizations? The added advantage is that they will already be spayed or neutered, and (usually) up to date on shots.
 

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I've been looking for a cavapoo or a cockapoo puppy for a long time now. I'd also love a maltipoo but it would need to be one of the bigger ones bred with a mini instead of a toy. I have been looking on Craigslist but there really aren't any there. The only ones available are the small toy maltipoos (too little, too worried about little kids hurting them).

I know there are breeders, which is a smarter way than looking on Craigslist. But I just cannot in any way afford to spend $3,000 on a dog. I need to spend less than $500.

I am in the Dallas (specifically Garland) TX area. Anybody have any suggestions for my search? Thank you so much!
Where do you buy them? Basically, you don't.

The chances of finding a responsibly bred dog of those mixes, especially for under $500, are pretty much non-existent.

The VAST majority of breeders of the cute little "poo" mixes are in it just for the money. Puppy mills often, sometimes they are a step up in terms of how they care for the dogs but are still just putting two dogs together and selling the pups to whoever hands over the money; without regard to the genetic health of the dogs, without regards to whether the buyer is going to breed the dog, without contracts to help ensure the pups are dumped in shelters later etc.\

And since Cavaliers especially have MAJOR genetic health issues known in the breed, testing is a very big deal for breeding them.
 

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How about checking your local rescue organizations? The added advantage is that they will already be spayed or neutered, and (usually) up to date on shots.
Definitely! I have looked at my local rescue and they don't have any available. Of course getting one from a rescue organization would be best, and I will keep checking in with them.
 

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Is there a particular reason it needs to be this mix and this particular size?

There are lots of actual breeds (not mixes) that are smaller fluffy companion type dogs.

Shell is right, 99% of the people breeding these mixes are doing so irresponsibly and are just in it to make a quick buck.
 

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So I grew up with golden retrievers and I LOVED them. But they are a bit bigger than I'd like & I need a dog that doesn't shed. It needs to be good with kids, I don't want to worry about it snapping and hurting my little one. I like the medium size rather than little toy dogs because I worry about kids being too rough with a very tiny dog.

I also just thing those cavapoos and cockapoos are just insanely adorable, so that's a plus :)

But any other ideas of other breeds you think would be good for me would be great!

Is there a particular reason it needs to be this mix and this particular size?

There are lots of actual breeds (not mixes) that are smaller fluffy companion type dogs.

Shell is right, 99% of the people breeding these mixes are doing so irresponsibly and are just in it to make a quick buck.
 

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Cavaliers and Cocker Spaniels are shedding breeds. Mixing them with a non-shedding breed doesn't necessarily make for a dog that doesn't shed.

Cavalier King Charles Spaniels are one of the breeds that most need to be bred carefully. Here are some health problems that affect them:
"Heart mitral valve disease (MVD) is a terminal illness which may afflict over half of all cavalier King Charles spaniels by the age of 5 years and nearly all Cavaliers by age 10 years. It is CKCSs' leading cause of death."

"Syringomyelia (SM) is reported to be "very widespread" in the cavalier King Charles spaniel breed. Syringomyelia is a disorder of the brain and spinal cord, which may cause severe head and neck pain and possible paralysis."

"Cavaliers are predisposed to a form of congenital deafness, which is present at birth, and also to a progressive hereditary hearing loss, which usually begins during puppyhood and worsens, or progresses, until the dog is completely deaf, usually between the ages of three and five years."



How old are your kids? Because if you're worried about them being too rough with a small dog, it might be better to wait until they are a little older since you don't want them being rough with any dog really.

As for breed suggestions, maybe a Bichon Frise?
 

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With a budget like that I'd definitely be going the shelter route. Responsible breeding costs a lot of money and time for a breeder and I don't think I've seen a fee that low for a well bred puppy. I wouldn't be looking for a specific breed, but instead a puppy that will mature to somewhere around medium size and non shedding. Just wanted to add that a lot of rescues will transport dogs (usually it's a bus/trailer full of puppies being sent to their new homes from rescues/shelters) and the total adoption fee (including the basic fee which covers spay/neuter, and transport costs) is around $400. At least, that's how much it is to get a puppy shipped up to New England from down south. So if you look on petfinder and contact a rescue if you see a puppy you like, you might be able to arrange shipping and still be under your budget. Otherwise, I'd suggest you contact the shelters and rescues that are close to you and give them some info about what you are looking for and ask them to contact you if something that fits the bill comes in. A lot of dogs get adopted before they even hit websites/adoption floors this way. I'd imagine there's more than one around you given the area you live in - google 'dog rescues near me' as well as 'dog shelters near me'.
 

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If you want a small to medium non-shedding dog I would really recommend looking at miniature poodles, shih tzus, Lhasas, and bichons before seeking out one of these high demand, poorly bred "designer dogs". If you are in the DFW area there really is no shortage of cute little poodley mixes that turn up in our local shelters and rescues. You just have to keep a look out for them. I see a good number of over sized yorkies, poodles and poodle mixes, shih tzus and similar. There are also the wire coated terrier mixes that would be low/no shed (I have one who is very small but I see them larger as well). While many would be higher energy than you are probably looking for you may be able to find one that suits your family dynamic. I would suggest looking at dogs around 1-2 years of age, fostered in a home with children.
 

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Don't rule out bichons and mixes thereof. My grandma has a shih tzu/bichon she bought off craigslist who came from a house full of girls of varying ages. That dog is muscular, sturdy, affectionate, playful, and bombproof. He may just be the product of dumb luck, but a clone of him would probably fit your situation perfectly.
 

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I would suggest looking at dogs around 1-2 years of age, fostered in a home with children.
This. If you look for a young adult, you'll already know the size. (My sister bought a goldendoodle puppy with the understanding he would be a medium size dog, he's now about the size of a standard poodle and still growing.) You also won't have the potty-training routine (at least not as intense as with a puppy who has to go out every hour or so). The foster route will give you insight into how the dog behaves and the foster parent will have probably already started basic training for good manners. I've adopted puppies and adult dogs (ranging from 7 months to 14 yrs) and I definitely prefer the adults. Puppies are cute but I like a dog I can start doing things with right away, is already relatively housebroken and is past the let's-chew-on-everything stage.
 
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