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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi
*Things to know - My wife decided to go on holiday for a week and left me with the bag on the 10 week old pup. I am awake from 5.30am - 12pm and live and work at the SMALL flat where the pup lives. So I am basically with it all the time.
*We rescued the pup, so didn't really have a choice. Thought it better than the pound!!! (just saying this as I have comments like "You should have thought about this before you got the dog)

OK
Anyway, as you can guess I am tired. No sleep hardly, trying to work, with little luck. Living in a hot country and now with a throat infection from the A/C. LOL. So...

This week we are going against the vet's advise and taking the dog for walks. It seems to be bored of being in the flat (yes I know that is obvious). I'm hoping it will change some of the pup's characteristics. I read the free download book sections on biting and human contact.

It tends to echo everything that is being said here. Things are getting better on some factors. But the question today is this:

It seems totally attached to me. I mean. Just now I sterilise the home by mopping with diluted chlorine. I don't want the dog to lick it or ruin the process, so I put it on the balcony and then lock the door. It goes berserk. Scratching and barking. However, when it can't visually see me. It stops and can lie down, etc. As soon as it sees me, chaos again.

I am wondering if this could be a result of being abandoned?

Another behaviour I have noticed is that she has some cotton cushions we gave for her to sleep on in the living room. Recently (and against corners of rooms) she has started trying to dig through them.
The vet said she needs more sun and has a slight calcium deficiency. I don't know if this can cause erratic behaviour (I know she is a pup) :))))

Anyway, is there a way to get the dog more independent so that I can work without it jumping on me, wanting to be at my feet all day, crying if I try to leave the house. Etc.
I need to point out that I live in Greece. There are NO yards, gardens, etc. These are multi-storey flats. The best is a 9x6ft balcony.

The bite training also doesn't not work as stated in the book. But she seems to do it more near feeding time. Could this be an indication she needs food, rather than aggressive behaviour?

Any help? I have two days before the wife gets back, and don't even have energy to play with the poor pup. I know that is what it wants, but sleep depravation has kicked in.

I realised just now I may seem a little harsh toward the puppy.
I just wanted to add that I love the puppy, love it is attached to me, and want to see the relationship grow.
I'm just concerned about it's need to be independent. Like just now. It was sleeping at my feet. I moved to the balcony to do some work, quietly. It instantly woke and came and slept at my feet at the balcony. :) This is sweet, but I want it to be able to be in the house one day without me being there and cope. Is this just a growing phase or are we glued ;-)))))
 

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More people will chime in, but I simply wanted to reassure you that it will get better. At 10 weeks, your pupy is still a baby and as such depends on you for everything. As for sleeping, do you crate the dog at night? What exercise does the puppy get? Apart from walking, which is a gamble when the pup does not yet have its full vaccination, do you play games with it? Maybe get a Kong (a rubber toy in which you can hide treats) to keep him busy when you want to work.

With time, it will get better.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I assume it will get better.
When it was small we placed her in a carry case in the kitchen. She is too big for that now. So we have dog proofed the kitchen and leave her there at night. The past week she has been good and not cried at all for 6 hours, and last night didn't even wee.
As for toys, we have several, and in a small flat we try to walk her up and down as much as possible. Of recent we do it until she pants, or doesn't want to even walk anymore.
I tried something earlier, which worked well. Sometimes she sits in front of me and stares and then barks. I decided to just stare back, before she barked. She didn't and after about a minute she looked away and laid down.
Don't get me wrong she is a lovely dog. Kind, friendly and trusts me totally. I can go near her when she is eating and even chewing her treat bone. Which a neighbour can't even do with her older and trained dog.
 

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The attachment/panic when you are not in sight is normal. Instinctively baby animals left alone are at risk of being killed by predators, so it is not unusual for puppies in the beginning to be scared to death to be alone. Alone training is important but must be for short periods and make sure the pup has something really awesome to chew on (a food toy, one where you can stuff it with kibble,treats, peanut butter etc). This gradually can be increased in length of time.

Training exercises and really short sessions of the same (five minutes here and there) will help with boredom as well as teaching baby that sitting, laying down, coming to you are all good things. When you cannot be actively with pup, make sure she has a chewtoy and put her in the kitchen.. As for the digging of the cushions, that too is normal behaviour (digging), if you don't like it or are worried about the cushions then remove them and give pup something else to do. Boredom means chewing, digging, barking etc. So making sure the pup has stuff to do that stimulates him physically AND mentally will make for tired pup and lots of naps.

Goodluck!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for all that! I will try and put some into practice.
The one thing I am worried about, as I have been trying really hard today.
Is the biting.
I did the "Ouch" and turning back, and even going to a different room.
She just keep coming at you. It doesn't hurt, but it's the fact that she doesn't respond to any sign that you don't want it.

Any other methods?
 

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We had a trainer come in for several sessions. When he was nipping at us, she told us to pick him up say "You lose" and put him in the crate for 40 seconds. Then go back and get him out or he won't know what he did wrong. I am sure there are dozens of methods but it did seem to work for us. He is teething and occasionally gets a finger if you are playing with him but that's pretty rare now.
 

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She'll be a little more independent in about 2 more weeks. See if you can invite lots of people over, 3- 5 at a time, to get her socialized with lots of people. That may help.

Also, not sure if I posted this:
Quick (but not complete) answer is to teach her Bite Inhibition - see the Sticky: The Bite Stops Here in the New-Owner area.

Tweaks to The Bite Stops Here:
1. When the pup bites, then yelp. It should sound about like what the pup does when you step on its paw...don't step on her paw for a sample :). When you yelp, the pup should startle briefly and stop nipping. Praise and pet. she'll bite.
2. When she bites the second time, Yelp. When she stops, praise and pet. She'll nip again, although it may be a little gentler. ...
3. When she bites a third time, Yelp (see a pattern?). But this time, turn your back for 15 - 30 secs. If she comes around and play bows or barks, then that is an apology. Accept it, praise and pet... and cringe in expectation of the next nip... [Accepting the apology is important]
4. When she bites the 4th time, Yelp, then leave the area, placing her in a 2 min. time-out. It is better if you can leave, rather than moving her. Then, return and interact. (She's still hungry...)
5. When she nips the fifth time, yelp, and leave the area, stopping interaction for now.

Pups need to sleep over night in order to learn their lessons. So, keep doing this for 3 days. By the third day, you should notice signficant Bite Inhibition. She may still nip, but it will be softer and she won't draw blood. Keep up the training and make sure that everyone yelps.... Very powerful method.

If you learn the technique, then you can apply the "yelp" to other circumstances, also. I believe that "yelp" is "Please don't do that, I don't like it." in dog communication.
 
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