Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts
O

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone, I just started clicker training my pet and I have quite some questions. I have read multiple times to only add a cue to a behaviour after some time (for example after the animal starts to offer the behaviour by itself). Up till now that hasn't been a problem because I only did some simple target training with a stick and making the her sit (which she does when I just let her wait a few seconds).
But when I train her to show multiple behaviours, how can I let the animal know what behaviour I want when I didn't yet add cues to the behaviours? Surely I must use something (like gestures?) until I added words as cues isn't it? Can someone shed some light on this for me please?
Thanks!
Ortho
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,379 Posts
I am not sure what you are asking. Are talking about the incremental behaviors to obtain a final behavior?? I add the word the beginning of the back chain. OR I add the word at the end of working in increments toward a final behavior.

Back Chain example
For instance I train the retrieve first by engaging the dog with the dumbbell (DB) while I sit in a chair. When the dog will take and hold the DB I add the word "Bring." As I back chain through the retrieve I start with that word.

So, start with DB hold at the chair. Dog holds DB in a sit calmly I add bring. Pretty soon the dog will take and hold DB when I say "bring." Next I put the DB on the ground and say "Bring." Ideally the dog picks up the DB and holds it in front of me at which point I click and reward (I do NOT say "out" since I am rewarding a calm hold). Then I build it backwards starting with the word "Bring."

Teaching a new behavior with the final behavior at the end.
For teaching recall and sitting directly in front of me for the word "here" I start with click and reward for the dog coming to me. Then I up the ante until the dog comes and sits in front of me and only reward when the dog is straight (this is all built incrementally). Finally when the dog offers to come and sit in front of me I add the word "here."

There are a hundred different ways to train anything (including both of these examples). Again, that is the answer if that is what you are asking. I do not name the increments.. I name only the final behavior.

Most dogs respond better to handler body language than to words (that is how dogs communicate as they are not verbal). I use both and then fade the body language because on the trial field all that body language is considered "handler help" and you get points off for it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,296 Posts
Ortho, if you are asking for the behavior in a clear way using an efficient technique or guiding with your body language, your dog will not be confused. If your dog is confused then I would reevaluate how you are conducting your training session. It is not a problem of lacking a cue.

Think of it this way... There are deaf dogs out there who can do dozens of tricks and even compete in agility. They never hear a single cue. There are deaf AND blind dogs that are also impressively trained...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,296 Posts
And technically speaking... You add a cue before the desired behavior is performed. 'Wait until your dog knows the behavior' is just easier to grasp for the general public. Because when the dog knows it, it will offer the behavior more, making it easier for people to add the cue.
 
O

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Wow, thanks for both your replies:). I really appreciate. So because an end behaviour might require several steps to master it's better to start adding a cue once the complete behaviour is mastered? That's easier indeed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,334 Posts
Generally, there are THREE ways to obtain or teach a new behaviour. 1) shaping 2) capturing, and ...

Surely I must use something (like gestures?) until I added words as cues
3) ^ luring.

When you taught your dog to target, I would say that's probably an example of using shaping. When you taught her to sit, by waiting for it to happen incidentally, that would be capturing.

Luring is when you "lead" the dog, usually with objects such as food or target sticks. This is useful for the initial stages of teaching behaviours such as spin in a circle, roll over, lay down etc, although the lure itself should be faded out (or turned into a more subtle gesture / signal) asap.

And yes, the verbal cues are typically added in once the dog becomes fluent and / or the behaviour becomes predictable.


There is a wealth of information on the clickertraining website. Here is a brief explanation of some terms and techniques. https://clickertraining.com/glossary/17
 
O

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks Petpeeve, that answers a lot of questions I had but wasn't even fully aware of having! The lure itself should be faded out asap and turned into a more subtle gesture.... sounds very workable :).
I just bought Click for Joy and will definitely read clickertraining.com. Thanks!
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top