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I am currently reading a book called "Dog Perfect" by Sarah Hodgson. She discussed a command called "Let's Go" that sounds awfully similar to heel to me. Do any of you use both commands? If so, what is the difference?
 

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I do. Let's Go means let's move in this general direction together, not necessarily at my side. Heel is a very specific position for the dog to take, relative to me, on my left side, close to me with his neck even with my left leg.
 

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I use "Let's go" to indicate to Alvin that I want him to walk on a loose leash by my side. I don't use "Heel" because to me that command means a formal obedience move in which the dog walks precisely next to the handler's left knee, matching pace, and sitting when the handler stops. I don't need Alvin to be that formal.
 

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I usually just use "Let's Go" and require heel position based on context. For example if we're in the grass and I say "let's go" I don't care if he lines up or not. But if we're on the sidewalk, then he has to line up. Might sound confusing, but he's figured it out well. He seems quite aware of the "terrain" he's on so he can adapt accordingly.

I don't have a heel cue, per se. Not good enough to compete in obedience, obviously, but it works out well.

If for whatever reason I need him to heel on the grass - I'll stop, and that causes him to line up with me and sit. Then when we move again, he's in heel position. In that case, I usually DON'T say "let's go" I just start moving.

I do have him sit when I stop (regardless of where we are) because I think that's pretty useful. I can "sit him" when a dog approaches or at an intersection while keeping my attention on the surroundings and less on giving him an explicit sit and then watching to see that he's doing it, etc.
 

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Heel is for formal obedience, the dog is at your left side, whithers lined up with your leg, looking at your face. Lets go just means to walk somewhat next to me on a loose leash.

Thats what it is for us.
 

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Even in formal obedience some people use "Lets Go" as the heel command because it comes out happier sounding, more motivational than the drill sargent, harsh sounding command to "Heel!".

Some use both commands to distinquish a casual walk from the formal heeling of obedience.
 

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I do. Let's Go means let's move in this general direction together, not necessarily at my side. Heel is a very specific position for the dog to take, relative to me, on my left side, close to me with his neck even with my left leg.
ditto. although my first dog has the command "come on" put on her instead of "let's go" now when we walk as a pack i say "come on, let's go" and both dogs walk
 

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My dogs sniff a lot. So during walks, we often stop so they can check out whatever tree, fire hydrant, patch of grass or trash can catches their fancy. "Let's go!" is for when I decide that sniffing time is over. It's kind of like "alright, enough sniffing, we're moving on."

"Heel" means walk by my side, next to my left leg. I don't use it very often, though.
 

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for me "Lets go" means for the dog to pull hard and run as fast as they can out in front of me

and "heel" means to stay by my side and watch me
 

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my first competition dog I used "let's go" for his heel.

Now with my later dogs "let's go" is for walking and "heel" is for competition.
 
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