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Hi All, I have this crazy idea to put together a training guide.

A few things to consider.

Name/Title of the guide:
Content:
Length of content:
Citations:
and more..

Any ideas?
 

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Every dog responds differently and comes from a different place genetically insofar as behavior, confidence, nerve and drives go.

There are plenty of general guides and advice out there to get anyone started but when it comes to the individual dog there is a need to tailor the training to the dog.
 

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I think people would like a project book.... book of ideas of Daily do's to work towards.. Love the nose work type of books.. gives you activities spending time with your pup... Living with, playing with is where so many skills are learned to be applied in real life. Find people do really well when they can focus on what they projecting..
 

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Post #3 is such a good idea (as in living with your dog!). It could be a really useful approach to suggesting practical advice for dog owners in everyday situations. I suggest the OP consider this kind of an alternative instead, being already prepared to invest in the energy needed to help other people. Perhaps those who contribute in this forum routinely (here) would add their own ideas/perspective/experience from which an overall guide could be compiled. Maybe we could list the general aspects to be considered regarding dog behavior, and how it points towards different types of training?

These are JUST suggestions (I am not "endorsing" particular elements). So don't beat me up with a rawhide chewstick. Everyone here should contribute with their perspective, and things to be considered.

The following would be on a scale of 1 to 10:

1. The nature of the dog (high or low energy).
2. Type of traits (confident, focused to hesitant and distracted to uncooperative)
3. What does the dog enjoy doing (lounging, walking, chasing, patrolling)
4. Who will be involved in shaping behavior (primary owner to the family dynamic)
5. What are ways to incentivize your dog (games, challenges, companionship, rewards).
6. What are everyday exercises (activities/approaches) that can strengthen your bond (relationship) with the dog (adhering to a routine, teaching manners).
7. Ways to teach/build self-control in everyday situations. (Waiting for a meal, treat, pleasurable activity).
8. For what reasons (and how) is confining (establishing boundaries) useful in dog training.
9. Universal potty training approaches, the very basics!
10. Interacting with others (dogs, people, unfamiliar situations)
a. Depending on the type of personality (confident to anxious to fearful)
b. Examples or occasions for desensitizing and providing everyday exposure to expand the dog's experience.
11. Correction, if, when, how or never applicable? (examples).
12. Achieved how, through time-outs, redirects, repetition, relearning).
 

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Title: I would not worry about a title right now. You may find that a title will jump out at you as you are writing the material.

Content: Before you consider content, you must first decide who your target audience will be.
Are you writing a book for someone who has never owned a dog before?
Are you writing for someone with a brand new puppy? Or someone who adopted an older dog that has already developed some bad habits?
Are you writing for someone who wants their dog to learn tricks? Develop skills that prepare their pup for agility training? Or just be a well-mannered pet?

Also, take a look at the books that are already available. Go to a book store and spend some time thumbing through the books. Do the same at your local library.
Most of the How to Raise a Puppy or basic Train Your Dog books I've looked at have the same watered-down content. Feed them. Crate them. Teach them sit, down and stay. Yes, these are important but is that the type of training information you want to fill your pages?

What will your book have that will make it stand out from the rest? What's your philosophy on dog training? Are you more of a Cesar Millan trainer or a Zak George trainer? Ask yourself why you want to write the book, and what training knowledge you have that you feel other people need to know?

Will your book contain photos to help the reader understand the instruction? If so, will you take the photos? Will all the pictures be of your dog?

I think some of the better books are specialized, targeting a specific area of training. Hunting dog training; Trick training; Crate training; Train your own service dog; Training the reactive dog; etc.

My post may sound like I am trying to discourage you. But I assure you that is not the case. I just think it is important for you to know what kind of book you plan to write before you actually start writing it.
 

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One skill that's not addressed very often is how to assess your dog. In order to tailor the style of training. Our breed specialty magazine once had a piece written about how to evaluate young puppies! Based on about 10 questions and providing exercises to put the puppy through. It was so much fun!!
 
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