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Speaking to crating... I have seen no correlation between "high energy dogs" and crating. But it isn't simply about crate=confinement/boredom=crazy when you let them out. The quality of a dog's time in the crate matters. The quality of a dog's time loose matters. The quality of a dog's exercise matters. And each dog responds differently to all three factors (and many more).

From my personal experience, both of my current dogs are high energy (they tolerate and enjoy large amounts of exercise and never act tired), and high arousal (regardless of exercise amount, they get amped up immediately if the right stimuli appear). I am sometimes jealous of people whose dogs come home nice and content after a hike and take a nap. My 9 month old dog came home from a 9 mile hike, played harder than usual with my other dog (who also went on the hike and was still game to play) for a solid hour, and was more inappropriate with him than I've seen in weeks. I basically had to tether her for her to take a nap. And she's not even as 'wired' in general as my 4 yo Dutch shepherd. In contrast, on some busier work days I just take them on two neighborhood walks and they are much calmer. Both these dogs have in the past grown up with double digit crate times during the day (as well as overnight).

Overall I've seen no correlation between extended crating (within reason) and problem behaviors in my own dogs, in my coworker's dogs, friend's dogs, or client's dogs. There is also no scientific evidence that crating for an ~8 hr work day is detrimental. Which doesn't mean that everyone should do it or that it is bad. But just saying, the whole crate debate is interesting and there are many, many more factors that affect a dog's energy levels and problem behaviors.

I do think that just because a dog enjoys zooming around and some level of unbridled freedom, it doesn't mean that freedom is necessarily good for them either. And if a dog already has challenging behaviors with other dogs, people, etc. I would be working on improving that dog's adoptability, which sometimes means limiting freedoms. For example, speaking to this particular dog, if she is already dog selective and leash reactive then I would absolutely work on in-home settling skills and not allow her to react at things walking by the fence. Some might find it cruel to keep a dog inside more when it so enjoys being outside. But practicing reactivity can exacerbate the behavior. And at the end of the day it is likely perceived aggression towards animals or people that determine if this dog has a happy ending... Not how much she enjoys being outside in a fenced yard or how well she tolerates being crated during a workday.
 
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