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I don't believe that requiring a yard is an effective strategy to guarantee a high-energy dog gets a home that's a good fit. I've known people living in small apartments who have active, dog-friendly lifestyles, and/or are into dog sports, and work their butts off training and exercising their dogs. I've also known far too many people who think that high energy dogs are totally fine just left out in the empty yard for an hour or two, on their own, as their only form of exercise and mental stimulation.

In either scenario, I think the most important thing is having a conversation with the potential adopters about their dog experience, lifestyle, and plans for their future pup. People who are prepared for a high-energy individual will likely volunteer all the activities they want to do with their future dog, or what they already do (hiking, running, biking, etc.) that they hope to share with a doggy companion.

I understand some hard rules get set in shelters because resources are limited and you have to make matching adopters and pups as efficient as possible while still making sure you're finding good and safe fits. But the yard/no yard thing has always bugged me since, in my experience, it's a really terrible indicator of how much time and effort people are prepared to put into meeting their dogs' needs.

As for the crating thing, I'm more in agreement with Lillith. Obviously some discussion should happen in regards to how long the dog will be left alone regularly (commute included), whether there will be anyone checking in during the day, what their contingency plan is if something happens and they're delayed getting home, etc. but many, many households make it work. And there's just not a lot of households where someone's home all day and are in the market for a high-energy dog with leash reactivity, especially once businesses resume more normal operations and fewer people are working from home again. Not something I'd immediately write off a potential adopter for, but worth a discussion to make sure they have a realistic idea of how much crating is too much.
 

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I'm not arguing that having a yard is a bad thing, or has no benefit to the dog. I just have known far too many people, some of whom I'm related to, who have the attitude that having a yard is a substitute for training, exercise, mental stimulation, or otherwise expending any effort on the dog beyond letting them out the door, so even if an adopter has a yard it's important to have conversations about what the owner's vision of life with this dog will be like.

You won't know if someone has access to a space where he can run by whether they have a yard, though. There's lots of options out there - long lines, access to property owned by friends and family, rented spaces (I've known people who will rent fenced fields from property owners, but many dog clubs and training centers also have these kinds of services), etc. It's also possible that there's other activities that will offer him the same benefits as running, such as dog sports, swimming, frequent hiking, etc. that someone doesn't need a yard to provide. I've made use of many of these myself, having an active young dog who loves to run, a small and awkwardly sloped yard unsuitable for much activity, and living somewhere with an off-leash ban during most of the spring and summer. Again, not saying throw out every application with a yard, just not to automatically discount those without one.
 

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@storyist I used dog sports as one example of a case where an adopter with no yard might be able to provide a high-quality outlet for an energetic. I know that's not most people, even when counting people who do sports classes for fun and don't plan on competing, but it's not impossible either. I don't know what kind of demographic vanee's dealing with or how popular or accessible various dog sports are, nor how do I know how many avid hikers are in their area, or whether there's accessible dog-friendly swimming options. But even if any or all of these things are uncommon, I don't feel it invalidates my point that eliminating adopters on the basis of them not having a yard - or needing to crate a reasonable amount of time - runs the risk of eliminating really good potential homes, and that the adopter's lifestyle, experience, and plans for the dog should be a bigger deciding factor than the property they live on.
 
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