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My little shih tzu is 10 weeks now and have been training leash walking. When my girls are with me, he follows them but when it is him and I, he lays on the ground. I am redirecting him with treats which seems to help and am teaching him to look at me and leave it alone during distractions.
Any tips?
 

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This is a confidence issue. What are you walking him in? If it is a harness, toss that and get him a proper fitting collar. A harness can inhibit some dogs.

Try tossing the treat instead of luring with the treat. Do short distances in the house first with no leash (just the collar). Get him excited to chase the treat and as he reaches it say his name and then feed another treat when he gets to you. Make it fun. You can feed him a meal of dog food this way.

When he is good at that, add the leash and be very careful to toss the food short so he doesn't yank himself at the end of the leash, but will go forward to the food and then come back.. all the while keeping the leash slack. You can also let him drag a leash around the house attached to a flat collar. The object is to couple the leash with good things as well as making it a "non event."
 

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I think harnesses are really great for small dogs especially. It's good to expose them to harnesses at that age, and it takes pressure off the neck. Especially if the dog is small, it should be wearing a harness unless it doesn't pull. Small dogs are at greater risk for collapsed trachea.

I would start by doing leash pressure games, not even walking. Most puppies and animals have no idea what a leash is. When the leash is tight, they feel trapped and they try to escape. They are not 'fighting you', it is just a natural response. I teach pups to come IN the direction of pressure to release it and get a food reward. I start with so little pressure that the puppy is not fighting it at all. If a puppy is planting or straining away, it is too much too soon.

Once the pup knows to approach me to 'get rid of the pressure', the leash walking comes naturally.

If your pup is not fighting the leash and is just lying down, do not pull but also do not let him back up. This is assuming your pup is good at the exercise above. Then, just turn your back to the pup and wait. The moment he comes along, reward him. Too often, owners 'teach' puppies to plant themselves because puppies learn that planting makes owners bring out treats to coax them.
 

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At 10 weeks they don't really want to go far from home. The rule of thumb is you are only supposed to walk them for 10 minutes per month of age. Mine is almost 4 months and getting her to go a half mile out and back without the kids (the desire to keep with the herd/pack helps extends her range like with yours) today was an accomplishment for her.
 

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At 10 weeks they don't really want to go far from home. The rule of thumb is you are only supposed to walk them for 10 minutes per month of age. Mine is almost 4 months and getting her to go a half mile out and back without the kids (the desire to keep with the herd/pack helps extends her range like with yours) today was an accomplishment for her.
That, and 10 weeks is not many vaccines and you need to be careful with diseases out there.
 
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