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My aussie will pull to his hearts content on a walk. If he is pulling and i switch directions he will turn and go right to the end of the leash. I can call his name and he will look at me and come, he will also sit for me too on walks. He just pulls. I use a clicker to train him. I will call his name and use the command "heel" when i want him next to me. I can hold a treat and he will walk next to me. As soon as he gets the treat he will just slowly get ahead and pull. How do I reinforce him not pulling. Should I just constantly be feeding him on a walk?

Also when we see another person or dog he loses all focus. He doesn't care about the treats. I know he loves peanut butter and would like to bring that with me, does anyone have any ideas how i can bring peanut butter to help him focus? Sorry for the long thread. Thanks everyone!!!
 

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My aussie will pull to his hearts content on a walk. If he is pulling and i switch directions he will turn and go right to the end of the leash. I can call his name and he will look at me and come, he will also sit for me too on walks. He just pulls. I use a clicker to train him. I will call his name and use the command "heel" when i want him next to me. I can hold a treat and he will walk next to me. As soon as he gets the treat he will just slowly get ahead and pull. How do I reinforce him not pulling. Should I just constantly be feeding him on a walk?

Also when we see another person or dog he loses all focus. He doesn't care about the treats. I know he loves peanut butter and would like to bring that with me, does anyone have any ideas how i can bring peanut butter to help him focus? Sorry for the long thread. Thanks everyone!!!
You need to turn and call the other way just before hitting the end of the leash to learn because there's nothing there that is aversive to being on the end of the leash apart from turning the other way unless he's really trying to get at something and not getting to that is the "punishment". Positive reinforcement in this instance works by not allowing the dog to practice the behavior and giving an alternate one (walking close to you).

You need to practice loose leash in none distracting areas first and then slowly escalate the distraction, dogs and people are probably the worst so it's too soon to expect him to walk nicely around those when he can't walk normally yet but if needs be get his attention and hold it while walking past, once he's focused on getting to them it's too late because he's over threshold and will not take anything in. If you get to this point you need to get his attention again by either pulling the other way and praising when he comes or calling him and really praising for any acknowledgment of you.

At the start the rate of praise needs to be super high because he's used to going forward and pulling from A to B so reward in a really rapid way when he's close to you so he's not going oh I have my treat now I'm going to pull so he'll turn around and treat me again yay! Keep at it and it'll probably click eventually, it's quite a hard behavior to teach.
 

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As soon as he gets the treat he will just slowly get ahead and pull. How do I reinforce him not pulling. Should I just constantly be feeding him on a walk?
In a manner of speaking, yes. Try feeding two, three or four treats 'in proper position' and in quick succession as you move along. For example, one treat per two steps at the very beginning. Then gradually lengthen the interval between treats. Possibly aim for about one treat per residential block as the end goal, but again, reducing the frequency of treats should be a gradual process that takes place over time.

I can hold a treat and he will walk next to me.
If you're luring that's fine for the initial stages, but try to get that lure out of the picture asap otherwise your dog will come to depend on that visual to perform the behaviour. It might be a good idea to use your empty left hand as a nose target for now, keep treats in your right hand or right pocket, and transfer each one to the left hand for timely delivery after clicking the nose/hand touch. Assuming you're teaching your dog to LLW on the left side.

Personally, I'd also teach this so that it's voluntary (not requiring you to call the dog's name to bring him into position). If not, you'll need to use a formal release cue each and every time he is allowed to enjoy some leash liberty and it could end up confusing the dog in the long run ie: like a yo-yo. Occasional releases during a walk are good but I'd try to keep them to a minimum, generally speaking. A method I really like for the voluntary route is "choose to heel". Here is a basic video, you can modify it to suit your taste but it's very effective for building a foundation and a reinforcement history for starters. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m5il8ym0ymY

Peanut butter may end up being a little cumbersome on walks, but you could try using a refillable squeeze container, maybe not exactly but something like the tapered ones used for cake decorating.
 

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There's a lot of dogma on dog training. My bias is to try to work from evidence rather than dogma. I found this article interesting . .. it's representative of attitudes that pre-date the current positive reinforcement dogma. Not saying it's correct. Just, maybe, worth consideration. Follow links to the full article.

http://terriermandotcom.blogspot.com/2015/09/four-ways-to-walk-dog.html
Did you read the full Atlantic article? I'll admit I only skimmed it, but the last paragraph says a lot about the training philosophies of this time:
I don’t know, but as I visited with dog trainers and read their books, I bumped repeatedly into the idea that human beings are the gods of the dog universe. Bill Koehler says that dogs have knowledge of right and wrong, but of course he is the one who defines the terms and metes out the appropriate reward or punishment. **** Koehler told me, “Come, sit, down, stay—that’s not really dog training. What you’re trying to do is get the dog to be responsible for his own actions, so that when he has to avoid a dog fight, stay out of trouble, or remain on a sit-stay or a down-stay on a blanket with six other dogs and you’re a quarter of a mile away, he knows that if he moves, God is gonna strike him dead on the spot, or you’re gonna come flying through the air and make a correction.” Barbara Wood*house recommends that if a dog is in the habit of tearing at trouser cuffs and overcoats, the surest cure is to pour water on its head. “This method is better than all the scolding in the world,” she writes, “for the dog doesn’t know where the water comes from, he only comes to realize that cloth-tearing causes it to flow.” One of Daniel Tortora’s rules for the use of punishment is that it “should be like a ‘bolt from heaven.’ The dog should feel that no matter where you are, when he has transgressed he will be punished.” Rich*ard Krokus, of the Seeing Eye, said it in so many words: “A dog is a dog, and you have to understand what makes them tick, and you have to get under their skin and make them think you’re God.”
You think that's better than current +R training? Really?
 

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terrierman's views are off-base and poorly thought out, as usual. Koehler didn't write "the book" on AKC obedience. Blanche Saunders did, 10 years prior. And she did more than write about it, she personally designed the entire activity right from square one. Koehler's work is merely an afterthought.

FWIW, I'll also hasten to point out that it's now the 21st century, and a lot of scientific water has passed under the bridge between then and now.
 

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I like combining 'choose to heel' with 'be a tree'. Dog is well aware treats happen by your side after the CTH work and when they 'forget' and get to the end of the leash they know where to go for a treat. I call out oops and there you go when dog hits end of leash then corrects position but do NOT treat until dog has successfully walked 1/2 to 10 steps with me. Been there done that! Inside 3x reps I had a dog ping ponging to end of leash and to me to get cookies. Took ME 10x before I figured out what was going on and days before I figured out how to fix it.

Also any time you see your dog glance at you reward the 'check in'. Dogs can be aware of your presence by ear, smell, sight, pressure. We HATE when they use pressure, that's pulling. Annoying to have to be talking to the dog all the time and no idea how smell would work for LLW but if they know where we are by sight then they can stay inside the leash range nicely.

I used a tube of anchovy paste once. Worked really well, dogs were happy to work for practically nothing. Probably didn't continue to use it because I felt guilty they worked so hard for what seemed like nothing and it is stinky. Do try that cake decorating tube or go heavy duty with a refillable tube from a camping supply place. Don't try a baggie with a hole punched in it. Dog teeth, just saying.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks everyone for all of the help. So when he is walking next to me and I'm constantly treating him, should i be telling him heel and click also? Or basically just treat him for walking next to me and he will learn Thats where to position himself?
 
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