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Discussion Starter #1
Brae is very well behaved around other dogs with me. When he sees a dog he usually automatically checks in and asks for permission to say hi. Or when he doesn't, usually if the dog is coming up fast or very close, he will still listen if I call him to me or have him sit at a distance. His track record is nearly perfect and I have no issues or qualms with him around other dogs.

HOWEVER, when my partner takes Brae out, it is the total opposite. With him, Brae has virtually never listened to "come!" around another dog and even run up to leashed dogs (a huge NO in my books). Dog culture is very apparent here and dogs are always running up to each other, which is a pet peeve of mine. I am not worried about Brae getting into trouble persay, since he's very appropriate (seems to have gotten past the auto-humping stage) and usually moves away after a quick sniff. But I have strong opinions about out of control dogs in general and I don't want my dog to be the 'but my dog is friendly!' dog.

I was gone for a week in April and a few of those kinds of mistakes happened on the trail as my partner was taking care of the dogs. Overall, he did a spectacular job but it's hard for me to overlook the mistakes. I was worried that my training was undone but Brae is definitely learning in context and there were no issues listening around dogs with me when I came back.

So I'm a little torn as to what to do... My partner is not trainer-brained, which is okay. He rarely takes Brae out on his own. But this is clearly Brae's habit by now and I don't want it to continue. I don't necessarily want to tell my partner to stop hiking Brae, especially since I'll be out of town for over a week soon and it'll be nice for Brae to still be able to go out.

Thoughts?
 

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Personally? I'd probably ask my partner to only do walks/hikes on-lead (or long-line) in this situation. Less because I'd be worried about his training falling apart, and more for the potential safety issue. I know you already know this, but just because Brae greets appropriately doesn't mean the other dog appreciates it, as well as how people can get kind of funny about shepherd-y "police dog" types. But of course stimulation and a chance to do dog things in a natural environment is also really important, especially when you'll be gone more than a day or two.

From things I've read and seen, the "behaves for me but not my partner/spouse/parent/sibling/roommate/etc." is pretty common, and these dogs are usually really good at knowing when (and with whom) they can get away with being butts.
 

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I agree, partner should walk Brae on a leash/long line. Don't even give him the opportunity to rush other dogs. He's earned his off-leash freedom with you, but not with partner.

Behaving differently for different people is so common... and not just with dogs, either. I joined a miniature-horse-walking club (yes, it's as fun as it sounds!) and those little horses will judge whether or not someone is firmer or softer right off the bat. They'll literally push the softer people around, or will pull them off the road so they can get at some grass. It's interesting to watch!
 

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I feel your pain....my wife doesnt know much about handling dogs ( her lab is about the extent of it and she's easy ) and doesnt care to learn more. None of the last three dogs I've owned would listen to her, or anyone but me. Since she doesnt care to get on board with all my ( in her mind, and others minds ) ridiculous rules, they just dont get to do anything with my dogs past the normal everyday casual interactions.
 

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I also agree with everyone else.

I don't think it's going to be a global problem where Brae suddenly stops listening with you - as said, it's not uncommon for dogs to behave differently with different people - but there is a safety issue there and it has potential to grow into a bigger problem with your partner, just like it would if it was happening with you.

I wouldn't bother trying to get your partner to become a trainer though. Just tell him to keep the dog on a long line or leash with him, unless/until he gets interested on his own. I try - and mostly succeed - in staying out of my husband's relationship with our dogs. OUR relationship with each other and his relationship with the dogs is better for it.
 

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Does your partner do training exercises with you and Brae? I don't think it is at all unusual for dogs to listen really well to "their person" and not so much to others who may be part of their family, but aren't really "their person." Ralphie certainly doesn't listen to my husband. Like, at all, lol, unless he's bribing him with a treat, and that's because he has not done much training with him, whereas I have. There just isn't a history of being rewarded for doing things for my husband, even though I know Ralphie loves him and they have a great relationship.

I would also have your partner walk him on a long line. I just bought a 100ft line for Ralphie that is light and kind of awesome, and if Brae behaves reasonably well for your partner and doesn't stray very far he can even just drag it so it slides around trees and weeds while hiking, but your partner can step on it and only hold it when necessary. I know those things can be hard to handle in wooded situations!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks all! Leash is the obvious answer and in the back of my mind I knew, but I just needed some unbiased parties to tell it to me. I appreciate you all :)
 
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