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Hi there, I live in Wyoming and am looking for another dog. I currently own an Anatolian Shepherd and since I already have one great dog from a guard breed I'm now looking to get a good protective dog from a hunting breed. My first thought was a Rhodesian Ridgeback or Blackmouth Cur, but originally being from the south and having some familiarity with these dogs while down there I'm afraid that they don't have the coat to withstand the extreme cold up here. I like to knock around in the mountains and Cross Country ski during the winter and would like the pup to be able accompany me. An Akita seems like it would would work but I'm concerned in about their aggressiveness towards other dogs and while eating. Norwegian Elkhound seems great but I prefer larger breeds that can get up to 80 lbs or greater.

Does anyone have any breed types they'd like to suggest or share whether they think there's ways a dog like the Blackmouth could enjoy the outdoors during winter?

Thank you.
 

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Protective against what? People, large wild animals like bear or wolves? Smaller wild animals like coyotes?

There's a member here that doesn't post much anymore by the name of Sassafras that has a husky mix that looks every bit an american bully, short hair and all, that she does cani-cross mushing with in I think Minnesota. Another member not around much now has/had two redbone coonhounds in either NH or Vermont that hike often. With proper sleeping quarters, proper nutrition and using coats and booties when needed, most large dogs will do OK in most weather that you would want to be out in recreationally. I note the recreationally part because working dogs for sheep etc would likely be out in worse weather than for cross country skiing.

Not quite as big but a Husky is kinda a classic cold weather dog and big enough to give most people pause at least.

A RR is protective for a hound but if not well bred can have a tendancy towards aggression. Coat is thick for a short coat but nothing compared to a northern breed.

Anything against an adult? Look for a good sturdy 1-3 year old at a shelter with a confident demeanor and a coat that feels right for your weather. Then you don't have to wait for it to grow up before starting to hike and ski with it.
 

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I suppose I mainly mean against people. Will bark well in the night should it see something and could act fierce should anyone ever get in the house. And also be safe and protective with children again against people or dangerous dogs.

I suppose another consideration is moose. I do run into them sometimes skiing. I've never been charged by one but many I know have. A dog that is appropriately brave and barky in such a sitaution would definitly be an asset.

I figured I could dress up most any dog to keep them alive in the winter, but my concern is they won't enjoy being out there even if they have a jacket on, especially on overnight stays, in unideal weather or wet snow.

Honestly the elkhound is really looking like a good option even if it isn't a giant. I'm suprised for what you can get one for, too.

Not really a hunting dog but the Belgian Shepherd seems pretty nice. Don't know much about it, though.
 

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A dog that will bark, maybe growl, that will alert you to unknown people or animals is fairly common. A dog that will ACT against a human intruder or attacker is a dog that requires extensive training and ongoing training and presents a liability issue, many would not be good around children not of their household and many cannot be left with dog sitters/kenneled for example. Livestock guard breeds are one thing but personal protection dogs a whole nother.

I would focus more on the athletic attributes you want-- running, hiking, cold weather aerobic work-- and to be good around children and known dogs. Then breeds that are more vocal maybe, alert dog types.

Medium to just a big large size dogs of like 45-70 lbs have an advantage of lifespan (generally) and lower risk of muscular skeletal issues (generally) than the very large to giant breeds. People who are not "dog people" usually see a 50-60 lbs dog as a big dog. A black or dark brindle colored dog is also a visually more intimidating dog to the general public.

Thinking outside the box, maybe a jindo?

Edit to add--
PatriciafromCO would be a good one to ask about guard breeds for harsh winter climates
 

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Go with the elkhound. It'll likely be good with the kids and will alert to any intruders, and the breed is known for hunting elk and moose. It's not a huge dog but it's 50-60lbs, big enough for the stuff you want.
 

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Liability.. LGD's are not the best OB reliable , may not be that dog out on the open trail that you could call back if a human shows up and worse a human with their dog..
They can be roamers with and without a fence ( why I think a second roaming dog such as a hunting dog may be a bad match for mischief)
compared to other breeds that love activities, LGD breeds are highly athletic more on short term attention for them.
Some breeds more reactive then others adding another equal reactive dog means you have two dogs that will not back down to each other
I don't feel there is any breed of dog that can stand up against a Moose attack
My guys see wild grass eaters the same as livestock not bother them
Majority of people who have the larger predators, run their dogs in larger packs to be successful as a deterrent level first and to fight to win if necessary
LGD breeds have different levels of intensity per breed, but they are all just as fierce in getting their jobs done.
They have specific traits for, territorial, seeing other dogs and people as threats. Bred well they are very balanced mentally, intelligence and ability to operate and react on many levels that are appropriate to the situation, bond to their families.

Bred well majority of all the LGD breeds naturally love kids, your kids and other kids..
Majority have ability to withstand hot and cold extremes when left out in the weather and are able to climatize with the seasons.

most part is taking responsibility of the liability , understanding what you have and what their limits are if they have them in what you want to do with them.
 

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Chesapeake bay retriever. Alot of people owned them where I'm from in south Carolina. Saw some friendly ones, but most of them were pretty darn aggressive and not in a fearful way.
 

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You may consider a Giant Schnauzer.

Fairly large dog with protective behavior yet high intelligence and low shedding. Originally used as working dogs on farms.
 

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What about a German Shepherd? They can certainly look fierce if needed, but a well bred dog is likely to be handler oriented, intelligent, great for obedience (staying near you when hiking).

A Beauceron may also be a good fit. A member on this forum has one, and I believe he/she lives in the mountains of Colorado, if I remember correctly. It is a large, 100 lb. herding breed with a short but dense coat. They have history as military and police dogs. They are protective, but sensitive to a situation, and a well bred dog is level headed and won't attack anyone for no reason. They are little known outside of France, though, and apparently they shed a lot...
 

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What about a German Shepherd? They can certainly look fierce if needed, but a well bred dog is likely to be handler oriented, intelligent, great for obedience (staying near you when hiking).

A Beauceron may also be a good fit. A member on this forum has one, and I believe he/she lives in the mountains of Colorado, if I remember correctly. It is a large, 100 lb. herding breed with a short but dense coat. They have history as military and police dogs. They are protective, but sensitive to a situation, and a well bred dog is level headed and won't attack anyone for no reason. They are little known outside of France, though, and apparently they shed a lot...
The other thing about Beaucerons, now that I know several, is that they are incredibly slow maturing. Everyone I know is a big, wiggly, silly, super friendly to everyone, puppy, goofball clown until they're something like 3 or 4 - and those are the girls, the boys are slower.

BITEY, but in a puppy/mouthy way.

They can look intimidating but if you expect attention span or to actually be standoffish/aloof/suspicious without waiting for somewhere around 1/3 of th e dog's life, probably not a good idea.
 

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Great Pyrenees. They were bred to protect their flock, yet they are great friendly dogs with people they trust. And obviously they can withstand the cold!
 

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Great Pyrenees. They were bred to protect their flock, yet they are great friendly dogs with people they trust. And obviously they can withstand the cold!
Pyrs are extremely independent dogs and I'm not sure they'd be great for off leash hiking and such, especially when they are younger. We have one and she definitely read the book on how to be a Pyr. My aunt had one who was a little more mellow, more show-line than from actual working dogs like ours appears to be, and even she still had a strong independent streak. They are fantastic dogs in their own way (like you said - great with kids and their family) but not necessarily eager to please, stubborn as all hell, and like to do things their way.

Definitely could be an option, but as someone who is an avid hiker/backpacker, if I had to choose between taking my Pyr or my Rottweiler/Akita mix out with me, I'd pick the Rottweiler/Akita any day.
 

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Beaucerons are generally not the best choice for protection in terms of being a trained personal protection dog. They are *generally* naturally protective of their people but they are very slow to mature and very handler sensitive. Protection training can't be done for them in the same way as a Malinois or GSD. If you are interested in one, be sure to find a good, ethical breeder. Right now a lot of the dogs have developed temperament issues due to poor breeders.

I also see you wanted a dog from the hunting background. Beaucerons are from a herding background. A lot of them are still used on farms in France.

I don't think it would be a good breed for your needs, but if you are interested, please PM me and I can give you more info.

What about a German Shepherd? They can certainly look fierce if needed, but a well bred dog is likely to be handler oriented, intelligent, great for obedience (staying near you when hiking).

A Beauceron may also be a good fit. A member on this forum has one, and I believe he/she lives in the mountains of Colorado, if I remember correctly. It is a large, 100 lb. herding breed with a short but dense coat. They have history as military and police dogs. They are protective, but sensitive to a situation, and a well bred dog is level headed and won't attack anyone for no reason. They are little known outside of France, though, and apparently they shed a lot...
 
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