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Discussion Starter #1
So I'm getting two kuvasz puppies (yes I read extensivingly about this breed) but I'd like to know about people's experience with this dog, although I know it's not a really comon breed. What did you do right? and wrong?
 

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Mostly, not to get 2 puppies together at the same time. It makes it harder for them to bond to you and for you to get them both adequate training. There was a female in my dog's puppy class and the owners were very concerned that she had started lunging and biting at people...
Beautiful beautiful dogs though...
 

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Yeah, I'd research littermate syndrome, if you're not already familiar with it. I'd worry more about that than about issues having to do with the breed -- especially considering that you've read extensively about the breed and know what to expect there.

http://paws4udogs.wordpress.com/2012/03/30/littermate-syndrome/
http://blog.betternaturedogtraining.com/2013/07/18/littermate-syndrome/
http://www.dogstardaily.com/radio/02-littermate-syndrome

Very basically, if you get two pups close together in age (related or not), they can bond to each other and not to you, which can make training difficult and result in issues with separation anxiety. Sometimes these dogs can end up fighting when they mature. If you really want two pups at once, you have to commit to training, playing with, and walking them both separately as well as together. It effectively triples the work.
 

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I contacted a Kuvasz breeder some time ago because I was really interested in the breed. I have a thing for white dogs I guess. Met a couple in person too.

Basically, they're very headstrong, big, powerful and intelligent dogs. Beautiful too. And serious guard dogs. Sensitive but stubborn. Memory like that of an elephant.

I really admire the breed, but it's nothing for me. Maybe when I'm older and live on a large property in a rural area.

I agree with BernerMax, getting two puppies --especially of this breed-- is NOT a good idea.

It's great you've read extensively about the breed, but I suggest you meet up with owners and visit breeders to experience for yourself what they're really like. Reading and seeing for yourself are two different things.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I did meet the breeders and some dogs too, I'm getting two puppies but it doesn't mean I'm getting them at the same time. I have the option of getting one of them now and another one by july ou august (not so far ahead, but it's something). I'd already thought about that, and I intend to separe them sometimes in training and everything. I know it may not be enough but we do what we can right =P
But you guys just gave something else to "worry" about hehe. Will research a lot about that too and get prepared u.u
Thank you very much =)
Actually I've thought about that but never really heard any breeder or vet talking about that around here .-.
 

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Have you raised a puppy before?

The breeder I contacted said that the most important thing when raising a Kuvasz is that you cannot force them to do anything, because if it ever comes down to you versus the dog, the dog will win EVERY single time. You do NOT want to turn your Kuvasz against you by being harsh or unfair.

You have to make it so THEY think it's a good plan to listen to you. They're not command-savvy dogs and their lives don't revolve around pleasing you. They're more like to give you the finger, as a figure of speech ;) So be persuasive in a non-forceful way.
 

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Do you have property or are in the city? I don't really recommend a LGDS breed for city living. They are more country dogs.
 

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Four or five months between puppies will not be enough to prevent littermate syndrome on its own. However, you may find that after raising one pup for that long, you may not want another one right away. ;) Definitely look into littermate syndrome a lot more, and keep in mind that two puppies really is triple the work, not just double.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I have a Westie which is the most sttudborn dog EVER hehehehe She's is REALLY SMART - seriously I swear she recognizes herself in the mirror and everything (dogs don't have this "hability").... ok she's little and don't cause much trouble. I've raised a few dogs, trained some too, a saint bernard, goldens, rottwailers... I know a lot about animal behaviour - of course I have a lot more to learn - and I'm up for the challenge - whatever happens they will not be abandonned or put down u.u I intend to train them whenever I can since the very beginning and I know phisical strengh won't work, they're smart and strongminded.
(Sorry about the grammar mistakes - sometimes it's hard to remember how to write somethings specially double letters xD)
 

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But do you live in town? Kuvasz are bred for guarding sheep. Without sheep to guard, well, they'll find an outlet for their sheep-guarding instinct somehow :/. Be prepared for difficulty.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Yes I do, so does the breeder... In Brazil people don't have sheeps hehehehe I mean you find some farmers...eventually...I know one which has Maremma Sheepdogs though (which was my other option). I talked to some people who got the dogs around here and they did well, although the breed wasn't selected for this environment. I think that with the propper raising I'll be fine =) Not saying it's going to be easy.... Generally they apply the sheep-guarding instincts for the owners...
 

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I think you need to visit this thread: http://www.dogforums.com/general-dog-forum/120333-caucasian-ovcharka-suburbia-unfolding-4.html

It's not all about "how you raise them". This breed is "stubborn" and a lot bigger than a Westie. The only one I know is just barely an adult. He is stubborn, but currently friendly towards me. That might change as he matures. I'm surprised any decent breeder would be fine to give someone two puppies unless they are very experienced with the breed.
 

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A girl moved from Germany to a house just a block away from me here in the States. Her family brought their dog along also in the move. She said it was a Kuvaz and I had no reason not to believe her. I remember the dog being big but not mastiff. The dog lived outside because this family did not believe in house dogs. I remember the dog being very obedient and tolerant of the kids. I remember going for long hikes with our dogs and never seemed to be a problem with the dog at all. The dog did receive obedience training in Germany though. I do not know if this dog's behavior is typical of the breed. I do know that this family loved the dog so much they brought the dog with them when they moved from West Germany to East Germany to the United States. Even here in the States I know they moved to two other States after the one they originally moved to from Germany. The dog just adapted to wherever the family moved to. It did get walked a lot.
 

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I just saw a Kuvasz doing agility in a local trial,so they are trainable but I agree they are not the most easy dogs.
 

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a large breed dog can be out and about in the city.
Yes, large dogs can. But livestock guardian breeds are. . .not very doggish. They were bred to work without human input, so they think for themselves; training is just a suggestion to them. And they can get restless without enough wandering room. Yeah, it can be fine if the owners are committed enough, just making sure the OP knows what they're getting into!

I did know a Great Pyrenees who followed her little girl all over. The little girl was about 5 when I knew them, I think, and everywhere in the neighborhood, playground, etc. the girl went, her dog was right there watching her like a little lamb :p. Nobody messed with that child! So, yeah, LGDs can channel their guarding to the family in the absence of sheep, but it's always good to recognize their instincts.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Yeah well....about the litter mate syndrom and everything...My boyfriend has tho goldens and they're almost a year appart...they kinda have this syndrom anyway...so I may be wrong, but I think the way you raise the dogs is more important than their age if you're going to have 2 anyway... I guess people just leave the second dog to learn everything from the first when they get them some time appart... and knowing this I'll do things the best way I can... Talking with an LGD breeder she says her dogs never experienced this and she thinks this kind of dog actually works better in pairs (when talking about guarding flocks for exemple) and simblings do better than just two together. What I'm saying here is that I think nothing in this world is a rule and unavoidable...
 

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one of the best things in personal dog ownership is having that one on one time growing up with them, especially getting a new breed experience and learning who they are as a breed and how to work with who they are and all that they can do as an individual and with what their breed offers to work with. I've done the litter mates in GSD's after being experienced in the breed knowing how they grow /mature and what their needs are for learning to bring out the best in their breed traits, and what parts of their breed traits can go very wrong at different ages if you don't tend to their learning needs. And the litter mates turned out just fine as independent adults well balanced bonded to me and not the other dogs for the extra time and consideration given to them. Am glad I started with just one for my first experience in raising my own GSD and grew them out into adulthood one on one with no distractions. Same with adding the Corso and the CO (only one at a time) ,, they are not GSD's , working well with them is about working with what they like and respond to.. I don't use the word stubborn, "Independent" is a better word in what I see in them.. So learning what interest them, what they like is a key factor in getting that willing responsive working relationship with them. Having a breed with intense natural traits even more important to have a close bond with them as a individual to really know who they are, and what they know. If you have the opportunity to really enjoy learning a new breed as a individual without the distraction of raising both pups at the same time.. I would wait at least a year or two between them and really enjoy learning the one and preparing them to be your foundation dog to help you raise the new pup. All my adults always helped in teaching a new pup the ropes.. If I think about it I only ever taught one dog a (Out, come) and every new pup after that learned from the adults for following them when I called it... :)
 
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